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Department of Biological Sciences
Graduate Programs

Douglas Leaman, chair
John Plenefisch, associate chair
Lirim Shemshedini, graduate adviser

The department of biological sciences offers graduate degrees at master’s and doctoral levels. Students entering the M.S. or Ph.D. programs are expected to have an adequate background in natural sciences and in mathematics. Usually, this will require knowledge of differential and integral calculus, college physics and organic chemistry. Students may be admitted on a provisional basis if they do not have an adequate academic background, but they will be expected to acquire it as rapidly as possible.

Requirements for the M.S. in Biology Program (Cell/Molecular Biology Concentration)

Option A (Thesis): For the degree of master of science in biology (cell/ molecular biology concentration), a student must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate course work approved by an advisory committee, including BIOL 6000, 6010, 6090, 6100, 6200 and 6930 (two hours) and additional course and research credits for 13 to 17 hours. In some cases, a written comprehensive examination may be required at the end of the first year for students with deficiencies in their coursework. The student must complete six to 10 hours of BIOL 6960, write an original research thesis, and pass an oral examination on the thesis.

Option B (Non-thesis): For the degree of master of science in biology, a student must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate course work approved by an advisory committee, including BIOL 6010, 6090, 6100 and 6930 (two hours) and additional course and research credits for a total of 30 hours. A maximum of three hours in BIOL 6960, 6980 or 6990 may be included in the minimum 30 hours. The student must write an original research paper based on library research that meets the approval of the student’s advisory committee and pass an oral examination defending the research hypothesis. Normally, students choosing Option B will not be encouraged to pursue graduate study beyond the M.S. degree.

Up to 10 hours of graduate credit may be transferred from another accredited institution, as recommended by the student’s advisory committee.


Requirements for the Master of Science and Education

For the degree of master of science and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science & Human Service graduate section of this catalog. In addition, no more than 8 hours may be earned in 5000-level courses. Students doing their theses in biology rather than in education must fulfill the same thesis-related requirements as other biology M.S. candidates.

Requirements for the Ph.D. in Biology Program (Cell/Molecular Biology Concentration)

The doctoral degree in biology (cell/molecular biology concentration) is awarded to a student who has demonstrated mastery in the field of biology and a distinct and superior ability to make substantial contributions to the field. It is not awarded merely as a result of courses taken, nor for years spent in studying or research. The quality of work and the resourcefulness of the student must be such that the faculty can expect a continuing effort toward the advancement of knowledge and significant achievement in research and related activities.

In general, work for the Ph.D. takes five years of study beyond the bachelor’s degree. A substantial portion of this time is spent in independent research leading to a dissertation. Up to 30 hours toward a master’s degree may apply as part of the student’s doctoral program. Normally 90 semester hours of study beyond the bachelor’s degree are required for the Ph.D.

Each student must complete an individualized program of study in the area of cell/molecular biology approved by the student’s advisory committee and the department. This course of study must include BIOL 8000, 8010, 8090, 8100 8200 and 8930 (three hours) and additional course and research credits to attain the minimum number of semester hours. Ph.D. candidates must pass a written and oral qualifying examination in the spring of their second year of the program and a final oral dissertation defense examination.

Courses numbered at the 5000 and 6000 levels are intended primarily for students at the master’s level. Courses numbered at the 7000 and 8000 levels are intended primarily for students at the post-master’s (students with a master’s degree, or with more than 34 graduate credit hours) and doctoral levels. Courses carrying a dual listing (numbered at both 5000/7000 or 6000/8000 levels) are available to students at both levels. In these cases, there may be substantive differences in the course requirements for students registered at the advanced level.

The department considers experience in teaching to be a vital and significant component of graduate education. Therefore, all graduate students in the Ph.D. program are required to complete at least one semester of formal teaching experience. M.S. students also are expected to acquire teaching experience as part of their graduate programs.


Department of Chemistry

A. Alan Pinkerton, chair
Jon R. Kirchhoff, associate chair
Joseph A. R. Schmidt, director of graduate studies

The Master’s Program

The master’s program in chemistry increases the professional competence of the chemist beyond the bachelor’s degree. Course work, independent research and small group discussions are emphasized to achieve this goal. The master of science degree can be viewed as an important professional goal or as preparation for study toward the doctoral degree. A non-thesis M.S. option is available for students with full-time employment whose current work responsibilities preclude the possibility of conducting the requisite research for the thesis-based M.S. degree. School teachers, non-traditional students, and employees of local industry who want to earn an M.S. degree for promotions and/or to meet eligibility requirements for teaching positions at regional community colleges may wish to pursue this option.

Requirements for the Thesis-Based Master’s Program

For the degree of master of science or master of science and education, students must meet the following departmental requirements:

a. The courses presented must total at least 30 hours of graduate credit, including at least four hours of credit in graduate research.

b. Registration for research seminar is typically required each term the student is enrolled in graduate research.

c. Each candidate must present a thesis.

d. Registration for chemistry colloquium is typically required each term, but no more than four hours of credit may count within the required 30 hours.

e. Each candidate must demonstrate satisfactory performance on a comprehensive oral examination on his or her thesis research, in addition to the public defense of the thesis at a colloquium presentation.

f. Upon choosing a research director, an advisory committee will be appointed to supervise the research, to administer the comprehensive oral examination, and to approve the thesis. Each student, in conjunction with the director of graduate studies, the research director, and the student’s advisory committee, will prepare a plan of study listing the courses and other requirements for the degree. Upon approval, the plan of study becomes the list of course requirements for the degree. Students typically take four or more 6000-level courses as part of the plan of study.

 

Requirements for the Non-Thesis Master’s Program

For the non-thesis master of science degree, students must meet the following departmental requirements:

a. The courses presented must total at least 32 hours of graduate credit.

b. Each student, in conjunction with the director of graduate studies, will prepare a plan of study listing the courses and other requirements for the degree. Upon approval, the plan of study becomes the list of course requirements for the degree. Students are required to take five or more chemistry 6000-level courses (minimum 20 credit hours) as part of the plan of study. To establish breadth in knowledge, at least one course in each of four (out of six) subdisciplines of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, materials, organic, physical) must be completed. Up to 8 hours of 6000-level courses in other fields may also be applied towards the degree with permission of the director of graduate studies.

c. Registration for chemistry colloquium is required during some terms, but no more than two hours of credit may count within the required 32 hours.

d. Credit for thesis research or research seminar may not be applied towards the required 32 hours.

e. Each candidate must participate in a Graduate Readings course and demonstrate satisfactory performance on a departmental literature colloquium presentation.

Requirements for the Master of Science and Education

For the degree of master of science and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service graduate section of this catalog.


The Doctoral Program

The doctoral program in chemistry is designed to ensure that the student has the basic foundation of knowledge and is equipped with the tools necessary to do independent research. The emphasis on research recognizes the power of original research to arouse the scientific curiosity of the student, to develop and stimulate creativity, and to encourage further discovery through independent study.

The doctoral program is divided into three stages for the typical student. The first stage establishes, through a set of prescribed courses, the foundation for further training. During this stage, a research director is chosen. During the second stage, the student will pursue research toward the dissertation and undertake comprehensive examinations, including the preparation of the required original research proposals. After meeting the comprehensive examination requirements, the student is admitted to candidacy in the third stage of the program. This stage is devoted to research and completion of the doctoral dissertation. The departmental degree requirements are listed in the following section. Further details on examinations and admission to candidacy may be obtained from the department.

Requirements for the Doctoral Program in Chemistry

Candidates for the doctor of philosophy degree must meet the following requirements:

a. Each student, in conjunction with the director of graduate studies, the research director, and the student’s advisory committee, will prepare a doctoral program proposal (plan of study) listing the courses and other requirements for the degree. Upon approval, the program proposal becomes the list of course and other requirements for the degree. Students typically take six or more 8000-level courses as part of the plan of study.

b. Successful completion of a comprehensive qualifying examination for entry to doctoral candidacy.

c. Registration for chemistry colloquium is required each term.

d. Registration for research seminar is required each term the student is enrolled in graduate research.

e. Each student must satisfactorily complete two semesters of supervised, half-time teaching.

f. After admission to candidacy, each student is required to spend a minimum of two consecutive semesters in full-time study at The University of Toledo.

g. Dissertation research must be carried out primarily in laboratories of The University of Toledo.

h. Each candidate must demonstrate satisfactory performance on a comprehensive oral examination on his or her dissertation research, in addition to the public defense of the dissertation at a colloquium presentation.

i. Each candidate must be a major contributing author in at least one accepted publication in a peer-reviewed journal prior to graduation.


Department of Environmental Sciences

Timothy G. Fisher, chair
Johan F. Gottgens, associate chair
Scott A. Heckathorn
graduate adviser

The department of environmental sciences (DES) offers graduate degrees in geology and biology (ecology track) at the master’s level and in biology (ecology track) at the doctoral level. Students entering the M.S. or Ph.D. programs are expected to have an adequate background in the natural sciences and mathematics, but may be admitted on a provisional basis if they lack such a background. Complete program details are available at the department website.

Requirements for the Master of Science Programs

Master of Science in Geology

A student must take a minimum of 30 hours of approved graduate course work, including six hours of thesis research and 24 hours of formal lecture courses approved by the student’s advisory committee. Up to eight of the required 24 hours of course work may be taken outside the DES, provided they are relevant to the student’s research program. At least 12 of the DES hours must be taken in geology. Students who do not have a baccalaureate in geology may be required to take remedial courses, none of which will count toward the 30 hours required for the master’s degree. Candidates for the master’s degree must prepare a written thesis, which is a report of original and independent research, and present and defend an oral summary of the thesis before a faculty advisory committee.

Students may choose between research-intensive (thesis) and coursework-intensive (non-thesis) tracks in fulfilling the requirements for the MS degree.

Master of Science in Geology (Thesis Option)

A minimum of 30 semester hours of approved graduate coursework is required for the master’s degree and a minimum of 19 hours must be earned in the major subject area. In addition, each Plan of Study must include the following courses (except when taken previously while an undergraduate at UT or as an equivalent course elsewhere): EEES 5200 Advanced Quaternary Geology (3 hrs.), EEES 5240 Soil Science (3 hrs.), EEES 5410 Hydrogeology (3 hrs), EEES 6100 Glacial Stratigraphy and Geophysics (3 hrs.), EEES 6930 Seminar (1 hr.), and at least 6 credit hours of other EEES courses at the 5000 level or above (excluding EEES 6960 or 6990) that must be taken for a letter grade (A-F). The remaining 11 credit hours shall include EEES 6960 (Thesis Research), a maximum of 6 hours of which may be taken for a letter grade, and may also include other EEES or non-EEES courses that need not be taken for a letter grade.

Prepare a thesis consisting of a written report on original independent research conducted by the student under the supervision of his or her thesis adviser (or co-advisers). The thesis should be prepared in accordance with the format specified by the aforementioned adviser and departmental regulations as well as be consistent with guidelines issued by the College of Graduate Studies.

Master of Science in Geology (Non-Thesis Option)

The non-thesis degree option is intended primarily for students with full-time employment whose current work responsibilities preclude them from conducting the requisite field and/or laboratory research for a thesis-based MS degree. School teachers (both high school and community college), non-traditional students and employees of local industry who want an MS degree in Geology for promotions or to meet eligibility requirements for work positions may wish to pursue this new degree option. The proposed non-thesis option for the MS Geology degree is identical to the non-thesis option for the MS Biology (Ecology-track) degree currently offered by the department, and is very similar to the non-thesis options available for other MS degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences, such as those for Chemistry and Biology (Cell/Molecular-track).

In contrast to the research-intensive thesis option for the Geology MS degree, the non-thesis option is coursework intensive with a minimum of 30 hours of coursework at the 5000 level or higher. Each Plan of Study must include EEES 5200 Advanced Quaternary Geology (3 hrs.), EEES 5240 Soil Science (3 hrs.), EEES 5410 Hydrogeology (3 hrs.), EEES 6100 Glacial Stratigraphy and Geophysics (3 hrs.), EEES 6930 Seminar (1 hr.), and a maximum of 3 credit hours of EEES 6960 (Master’s Research) or EEES 6990 (Independent Study). Of the remaining 14 credit hours of coursework, at least four credits of additional, letter graded (A-F) EEES lecture or laboratory courses (5000 level or higher) should be completed. Remaining coursework may be taken either within or outside the ES Department, should be for a letter grade and must be approved by the student’s advisory committee.

Non-thesis option students do a capstone project that will typically be based only on literature research. They will choose a project adviser from among the geology faculty and a project topic prior to the completion of their first semester in the program. The project adviser chairs the student's advisory committee, and has primary responsibility for the student's academic advising and project direction. The advisory committee will consist of at least three members, including the project adviser, with at lest two of the members from the faculty in the Department of Environmental Sciences. Students will prepare a written project report and must pass an oral defense of the project results.

Students must make up any undergraduate course deficiencies during their first year (including summer) in the program, and these courses will not count toward the 30 hours required for the MS degree.

Master of Science in Biology (Ecology Track)

Students may choose between research-intensive (thesis) and coursework-intensive (non-thesis) tracks in fulfilling the requirements for the MS degree.

Option A (Thesis): A student must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate course work approved by the student’s advisory committee. A minimum of 19 hours of this requirement must be earned in the major subject area. In addition, each plan of study must include EEES 6400 (Advanced Biostatistics), 6600 (Foundations of Ecology) and 6930 Seminar (one hour) and a selection of at least ten credit hours of formal EEES courses (or pending approval of the student’s thesis committee, non-EEES courses) at the 5000 level or above (excluding 6960 or 6990) that must be taken for a letter grade (A–F). The remaining 11 credit hours shall include EEES 6960 (Thesis Research), a maximum of 6 hours of which may be taken for a letter grade, and may also include other EEES or non-EEES courses that need not be taken for a letter grade. The student must write and defend a research thesis consisting of a written report of original and independent research

Option B (Non-thesis): A student must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate course work approved by the student’s advisory committee. A minimum of 18 hours of this requirement must be earned in the major subject area. In addition, each plan of study must include EEES 6400, 6600, 6930 Seminar (one hour) and a maximum of 3 credit hours of EEES 6960 (Master’s Research) or EEES 6990 (Independent Study). Of the remaining 18 credit hours of coursework, at least 12 credits of additional, letter graded (A–F) EEES lecture or laboratory courses (5000 level or higher) should be completed.  Remaining coursework may be taken either within or outside DES, should be for a letter grade and must be approved by the student’s advisory committee. The student also must write an original paper based on library research that meets the approval of the student’s advisory committee. Normally, students choosing Option B will not be encouraged to pursue graduate study beyond the M.S. degree.

Master of Science and Education in Biology (Ecology Track)

Master of Science and Education in Geology

The master of science and education (MSE) is a degree offered by the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science & Human Service in collaboration with the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Within the degree program, area concentrations are possible in both ecology and geology. The MSE is intended for persons who (1) already have a baccalaureate degree, (2) are already licensed to teach earth science or life science at the junior high or high school level, and (3) want the degree in order to expand their knowledge in the area of their teaching specialization.For the degree of master of science and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service graduate section of this catalog. Within the minimum of 15 hours of course work to be taken in DES and in the selection of the thesis or project topic, students may specialize in either ecology or geology. Students who do not have a baccalaureate in ecology or geology may be required to take remedial courses, which will not count toward the 36 hours required for the master’s degree.

Requirements for the Doctoral Program in Biology (Ecology Track)

The doctoral degree in biology (ecology track) is awarded to a student who has demonstrated mastery in the field of biology and a distinct and superior ability to make substantial contributions to the field. It is not awarded merely as a result of courses taken or for years spent in studying or research. The quality of work and the resourcefulness of the student must be such that the faculty can expect a continuing effort toward the advancement of knowledge and significant achievement in research and related activities.

In general, work for the Ph.D. takes at least four years and 90 semester hours of study beyond the bachelor’s degree. A substantial portion of this time is spent performing independent research leading to a dissertation. Work performed toward a master’s degree may apply as part of the student’s doctoral program.

Each student must complete an individualized program of study in an area of ecology that is approved by the student’s advisory committee. This program must include two semesters of statistics (e.g., EEES 8400 and an advanced multivariate statistics course such as EEES 8650), EEES 8600 and 8930 (one hour), a selection of at least 12 credit hours of formal EEES courses (or pending approval of the student’s thesis committee, non-EEES courses) at the 5000 level or above (excluding EEES 8960 and EEES 8990), and additional courses and research credits to meet the minimum required number of semester hours. Ph.D. students must pass a written qualifying examination during the first two years of study and an oral comprehensive examination involving a defense of their research proposal after gaining admission to candidacy.

Courses numbered at the 5000 and 6000 levels are intended primarily for students at the master’s level. Courses numbered at the 7000 and 8000 levels are intended primarily for students at the post-master’s (students with a master’s degree or with over 34 graduate credit hours) and doctoral levels. Courses carrying a dual listing (numbered at both 5000/7000 or 6000/8000 levels) are available to students at both levels. In these cases, there may be substantive differences in the course requirements for students registered at different levels.

The department considers experience in teaching and professional activity within the academic community to be a vital and significant component of graduate education. Therefore, all graduate students in the Ph.D. program are required to complete at least one semester of formal teaching experience before graduation. In addition, before a student graduates, she or he is to: (1) submit a proposal for extramural funding to help support their research; (2) submit a manuscript on their research to a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal (this manuscript cannot be a product of previous MS work); (3) give either an oral or poster presentation on their research at a professional conference; and (4) make an oral presentation on their research at a scholarly forum.


Department of Mathematics

Paul Hewitt, chair
Gerard Thompson, Associate Chair
Biao Ou, Graduate Adviser

A full description of programs and requirements, with syllabi for exams, is available from the department office or on its Web site at www.math.utoledo.edu. The paragraphs below represent a synopsis of the essential elements.

Requirements for the Master’s Programs

Master of Arts

To obtain the master of arts degree in mathematics, students must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit and meet the following requirements:

1. Complete two-semester sequences in abstract algebra (5330, 5340), real analysis (5820, 5830), and topology (5450, 5460), and a semester course in complex analysis (5880).

2. Complete one, two-semester sequence at the 6000 level in algebra, topology, differential geometry, differential equations or analysis.

3. Complete one of the following courses: Classical Differential Geometry, Ordinary Differential Equations, Partial Differential Equations, Calculus of Variations and Optimal Control, or any course at the 6000 level listed under item 2.

4.         The student must pass comprehensive examinations or write a master’s thesis. If a thesis is elected, the student must take an oral examination on the general area of the thesis.

Master of Science

The degree of master of science can be obtained in one of two options.

Option A – Applied Mathematics: To obtain the degree of master of science in the applied mathematics option, the student must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit and meet the following requirements:

1. Complete two-semester sequences in numerical analysis (5710, 5720), real analysis (5820, 5830), and differential equations (6500, 6510), and a semester course in complex analysis (5880).

2. Remaining courses may be chosen from the following: Applied Functional Analysis, Differential Geometry, Differential Equations, Dynamical Systems, Methods of Mathematical Physics, Functional Analysis, Complex Analysis, Discrete Structures and Analysis of Algorithms, Probability, Statistics Probability and Statistics, Operational Mathematics or Calculus of Variations.

3. The student must pass a comprehensive examination or submit and defend a master’s thesis.

Option B – Statistics: To obtain the degree of master of science in the statistics option, the student must complete a minimum of 35 semester hours of graduate credit and meet the following requirements:

1. Complete Applications of Statistics I, Applications of Statistics II, Linear Statistical Methods, Theory and Methods of Sample Surveys, Statistical Computing, Statistical Consulting I, Statistical Consulting II, Categorical Data Analysis, Distribution Free and Robust Statistical Methods, Statistical Inference, and Multivariate Statistics.

2. Complete one of the following: Applied Probability, Measure Theoretic Probability, Theory of Statistics, or Topics in Statistics.

3. Complete one of the following: Linear Algebra I, Applied Linear Algebra, Introduction to the Theory of Probability, Advanced Calculus.

4. Pass a two-part comprehensive examination, one part in probability and statistical theory and one part in applied statistics.

Master of Science and Education or Master of Arts and Education

For the degree of master of arts and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service graduate catalog. The following requirements must also be met:

1. A minimum of 32 hours of graduate credit must be completed. Colloquium and proseminar do not count toward the 32 hours. At least 18 hours must be in mathematics and nine hours in education, with an additional six hours to be assigned in conference with the adviser. As part of the additional six hours, the student may elect to write a paper in mathematics education or one of expository character in mathematics.

2. The total graduate and undergraduate program must include the following: at least six hours of abstract algebra and/or linear algebra, six hours in geometry, statistics, probability and/or computer programming, three to six hours of analysis (beyond calculus), three hours of complex analysis and one course in logic and foundations.

3. The student must pass comprehensive examinations in three of the areas of study of mathematics. The exact areas are to be arranged with the adviser.

4. For information on the education course requirements, see the program description provided by the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service.

Requirements for the Doctoral Program

The doctorate in mathematics is offered with concentrations in either mathematics or statistics. The broad requirements for these programs are as follows:

1. Each student must pass a preliminary examination at the Master’s level by the end of the first year and a qualifying examination within two years of entering the program. Mathematics students must pass two topics chosen from algebra, topology and analysis. For statistics students, the two topics must be measure-theoretic probability and probability and statistics.

2. A minimum of 90 hours of graduate credit must be completed. Colloquium and proseminar do not count in the 90 hours. Of the 90 hours, at least 18 but no more than 36 shall be allotted for the dissertation. Mathematics students must complete two-semester sequences at the 6000 level in algebra, topology, real analysis and complex analysis. Statistics students must complete probability and statistics, measure-theoretic probability, statistical methods, data analysis and multivariate statistics.

3. The student must pass an oral examination in the general area of the intended thesis research within one year of passing the qualifying examination.

4. The student must demonstrate the ability to read mathematical literature in one foreign language, ordinarily chosen from French, German or Russian. Another language may be substituted if it is necessary for the student’s specific program. The language requirement must be met before beginning dissertation research.

5. All doctoral students are expected to participate in a seminar on undergraduate teaching methods and to spend two consecutive semesters in supervised teaching. This requirement should be met before beginning dissertation research.

6. The student must write a Ph.D. dissertation under the direction of a faculty member. Before completing the dissertation, the student must report on it in an open seminar. An outside examiner must approve the completed dissertation, and the student must defend it before a faculty committee appointed for that purpose.


Department of Physics and Astronomy

Lawrence Anderson-Huang, chair
Song Cheng, graduate adviser

Requirements for the Master’s Degree

For the master of science or master of science and education, a student must complete 30 hours of graduate credit that includes the following:

(a) PHYS 6140 and an additional 15 hours of graduate course credit in physics, with six of the 15 hours numbered above 6000. Credit in PHYS 5900, 6010 and/or 6020 will not count toward either degree.

(b) The student must present a satisfactory thesis based on directed research, for no more than eight credit hours.

(c) The remaining hours within the 30 total may be chosen from graduate courses approved by the student’s committee. In some cases students working toward the Ph.D. may earn the M.S. or the M.S.E. degree without formal presentation of the M.S. thesis if they have passed the Ph.D. qualifying examination, satisfied the course requirements for the M.S., and completed a research project under the supervision of a research adviser. Students meeting these requirements may petition the department to grant the M.S. without formal presentation of a thesis.

M.S. in Physics with Materials Science Option

A master of science degree in physics with a materials science option is available. For this degree, a student must complete 30 hours of graduate credit, including the following:

(a) PHYS 6140, 6540, 6550 and an additional 12 hours of graduate course credit in physics with six of the 12 hours numbered above 6000 (no degree credit for PHYS 5900, 6010 or 6020).

(b) The student must present a satisfactory thesis based on directed research, for no more than eight credit hours.

(c) The remaining hours within the 30 total may be chosen from any graduate courses approved by the student’s committee.

Master of Science and Education

For the degree of master of science and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service graduate section of this catalog.

Requirements for the Doctoral Program

For the doctor of philosophy degree, a student must complete a total of 90 hours of graduate credit including the following: MATH 6730; PHYS 7220, 7250, 7260, 7320, 7330 and 7450; at least 18 additional hours of credit in physics in courses numbered higher than 6100 approved by the student’s committee; and 30 to 48 hours allowed for the dissertation research, depending on the nature of the research and the needs of the student. Credit in PHYS 5900, 6/8010, 6/8020, 6/7030 or 7910 will not count toward degree requirements.

The doctoral degree requirements include a Ph.D. qualifying examination, a comprehensive examination, and a final oral examination. Passing the qualifying examination is a prerequisite for status as a Ph.D. candidate in physics. After passing the qualifying examination, the doctoral student must select a field of specialization. A faculty committee is formed, chaired by the research adviser, to evaluate the student’s progress and to establish an appropriate program of course work. This committee administers the oral comprehensive examination, after which only the dissertation research requirement remains. The graduate program ends with the student presenting the dissertation and defending it satisfactorily in an oral examination.

Ph.D. in Physics with Concentration in Astrophysics

The Ph.D. in physics with concentration in astrophysics satisfies all the requirements for the Ph.D. in physics while preparing students for a career in astronomy and astrophysics.

To fulfill the requirement of 18 hours of credit in physics courses numbered above 6100, the concentration requires:

  • PHYS 6/7810-20-30-40 [Stellar Astrophysics I and II, Galactic Astronomy I and II]
  • Two related elective courses, which may include: PHYS 6/7710 [Atomic Physics], PHYS 6/7720 [Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy], PHYS 6/7740 [Nuclear Physics], PHYS 8860 [General Relativity], or PHYS 8870 [Cosmology] or other appropriate courses

In addition:

  • Three hours of PHYS 6/8980 [Special Topics] on an astrophysics-related topic or PHYS 6/8890 [Current Issues in Astrophysics]
  • A satisfactory dissertation in astronomy or astrophysics with a supervisor who is a member of the Ritter Astrophysical Research Center.

Ph.D. in Physics with Concentration in Materials Science

The Ph.D. in physics with concentration in materials science satisfies all the requirements for the Ph.D. in physics while preparing students for a career in materials science.

In addition, the concentration requires:

  • Two core courses in the fundamentals of materials science:

PHYS 8540 Structure, Defects and Diffusion

PHYS 8550 Thermodynamics and Phase Transformation in

Condensed Systems;

  • Two additional elective courses in materials science and engineering chosen from a list of courses approved by the faculty of the Center for Materials Science and Engineering; and
  • A dissertation in a materials-related field with a supervisor who is a member of the Center for Materials Science and Engineering.

Ph.D. in Physics with Concentration in Medical Physics

The Ph.D. in physics with concentration in medical physics satisfies all of the requirements for a Ph.D. in physics degree while preparing students for a career in medical physics. The medical physics-related courses, which total at least 27 credit hours, are provided by the College of Medicine and Life Sciences. The student’s faculty advisory committee will consist of faculty members from the department of physics and astronomy and the medical physics fields. The committee may also include other members appropriate for this degree. A dissertation research project is chosen that will have relevance to both physics and medical physics. The Ph.D. requirement of 18 additional credit hours outside the core courses will be satisfied by the specified additional graduate courses in physics and in medical physics.

Ph.D. in Physics with M.S. in Engineering

The University of Toledo has established a joint program leading to the Ph.D. degree in physics and the master of science degree in computer science and engineering (CSE) or in electrical engineering (EE). The program is designed for physics students who wish to obtain background in either of the engineering fields and for engineering and computer science students who wish further study in physics. It is designed so that the B.S. in computer science and engineering or electrical engineering is not required. In order to complete this program, students must satisfy all the requirements for the Ph.D. in the department of physics and astronomy and the M.S. degree in the department of electrical engineering and computer science. Some courses will satisfy both requirements. Students will normally enter the program after passing the Ph.D. qualifying examination in physics and satisfying the entrance requirements to the electrical engineering and computer science graduate program. The student’s Ph.D. dissertation adviser will be in physics and astronomy, and an adviser in electrical engineering and computer science will serve as the outside member on the student’s advisory committee. Students will normally take one course per semester in electrical engineering and computer science, along with courses in physics.

Last Updated: 6/26/15