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Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers - Education Modules

When saying what I said did not mean what I really meant to say: A Female Perspective

Author: Cheryl E. Gies, DPN, APRN, CNP

Did you know that most caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are women? Personal reasons ranging from love to guilt are why women say they become caregivers. As a woman, you spend most of your day doing care work, dealing with changes in your loved one's health and behavior and taking on added responsibilities as their ability to function and communicate declines. This is hard work and puts you at risk for strain, depression and health problems.

AD changes your loved one's ability to communicate. They have difficulty giving a clear message to you and understanding a message from you. This can lead to frustration for both of you. You may feel sad, tense or angry and your loved one may become agitated and even aggressive. This type of behavior can be emotionally and physically difficult for you. Dealing with the communication and related behavior problems of your loved one with AD is difficult and stressful for you.

This module offers tips for dealing with some common communication problems identified when caring for loved ones with AD. Hopefully you will find some of these resources helpful.

Learning Objectives:
Using this module will help you to:

  1. Sharpen your communication skills
  2. Identify signs of mood changes
  3. Know when to use redirection

Presenters:

Cheryl GiesCheryl Gies, DNP, APRN, CNP

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David J. LymanstallDavid J. Lymanstall, MEd, MSN, RN


Presentation Notes:

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Helpful Web Links to Improve Communication

1. How to approach
Click on the link below and then click on the white arrow in the middle of the black screen
https://www.dementiacarecentral.com/video/video-approach/

2. How to speak to
Click on the link below and then click on the white arrow in the middle of the black screen
http://www.dementiacarecentral.com/video/speak 

Click on the link below and then click on the white arrow in the middle of the black screen
https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/alzheimers-caregiving-changes-communication-skills 

3. How to have a conversation
Click on the link below and then click on the white arrow in the middle of the black screen
http://www.dementiacarecentral.com/video/conversation

Click on the link below, it will start by itself
http://www.hcinteractive.com/79

4. How to encourage cooperation
Click on the link below and then click on the white arrow in the middle of the black screen
https://www.dementiacarecentral.com/video/video-how-to-motivate-a-person-with-dementia/

5. How to touch
Click on the link below and then click on the white arrow in the middle of the black screen
http://www.dementiacarecentral.com/video/touch

6. How to deal with stress and agitation
Click on the link below and then click on the green arrow in the middle of the screen
https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/coping-agitation-and-aggression-alzheimers-disease

7. How to respond to sudden mood or behavior changes
Click on the link below, it will start by itself
http://www.hcinteractive.com/78

Other Resources to Read: 

References:

Bedard, M.  Kuzik, R., Chambers, L., Molloy, D.W., Dubois, S., & Lever, J.A.  (2005).  Understanding burden differences between men and women caregivers: The contribution of care-recipient problem behaviors. International Psychogeriatrics,17(1), 99-118.

Calasanti, T. & King, N. (2007). Taking "women's work" "like a man": Husbands' experiences of carework. The Gerontologist, 47(4), 516-527.

Hayes, J., Zimmerman, M.K. & Boylstein, C. (2010). Responding to symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease: Husbands, wives, and the gendered dynamics of recognition and disclosure. Qualitative Health Research, 20(8), 1101-1115.

National Women’s Health Report (n.d.). Women & Caregiving.  National Women’s Health Resource Center. http://www.healthywomen.org/

Nichols, L.O., Martindale-Adams, J., Greene, W.A., Burns, R., Graney, M.J. & Lummus, A. (2006). Dementia caregivers’ most pressing concerns. Clinical Gerontologist, 32, 1-14.

Pinquart, M., & Sorensen, S. (2006). Gender differences in caregiver stressors, social resources, and health: An updated meta-analysis. Journal of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences & Social Sciences, 61B(1), 33-45.

Last Updated: 8/28/18