Physiology and Pharmacology

Lee E. Faber, Ph.D.


Professor Emeritus

Phone: (419) 383-4584
Fax: (419) 383-2871

Email: Lee.Faber@utoledo.edu

Training:

  • A.B., Zoology, 1964, Duke University, Durham, NC
  • M.S., Biology, 1967, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH
  • Ph.D., Zoology, 1970, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Appointments:

  • Professor Emeritus, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Health Science Campus, 2006
  • Professor, Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, Ohio Department of Physiology & Molecular Medicine, 1994 - 2005
  • Professor, Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, Ohio, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1990 - 2005
  • Associate Professor, Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, Ohio, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Physiology, - 1978 - 1989
  • Director, Endocrine Research, Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, Ohio,  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1974 - 1994
  • Assistant Professor, Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, Ohio, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Physiology, 1975 - 1978
  • Research Assistant Professor, Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, Ohio, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Physiology, 1974 - 1975
  • Acting Director, Institute of Medical Research of The Toledo Hospital, Toledo, Ohio, 1973 - 1974
  • Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Medical Research of The Toledo Hospital, Toledo, Ohio, 1971 - 1974
  • Teaching Assistant, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, 1966 - 1968
  • Research Assistant, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, 1965 - 1966

Research:

Historically our research interest has involved the purification and characterization of the nontransformed mammalian progestin receptor system. These studies were initiated in 1971 and continue today. Over the course of these researches, we discovered p59, a ubiquitous receptor associated protein. This was made possible by the development of KN382/EC1, a hybridoma secreting an anti-p59 antibody. Our laboratory was the sole source of the antibody and as such we provided it to workers around the world. Subsequently we established p59's identity as the immunophilin (FKBP52).

Recent Selected Publications:


Last Updated: 6/26/15