University Teaching Center

Student-Centered Teaching Practices

We choose to teach college students because we are committed to the proposition that education can indeed be liberating. How we teach the students who enter our classrooms can make the difference between students who realize their potential and those who leave us discouraged about their possibilities. These resources, organized by topic, offer frameworks and strategies faculty can use to make their classrooms vibrant learning spaces for every student who walks through the door.

 

Equity

AAC&U (2018). A Vision for Equity: Results from AAC&U’s Project Committing to Equity and Inclusive Excellence: Campus-Based Strategies for Student Success. Available at: https://www.aacu.org/publications/vision-equity

Gay, G. (2010). Culturally Responsive Teaching: Theory, Research and Practice (2nd Ed). New York: Teachers College Press.

Hammond, Zaretta. Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain: Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin. 2015.

Delpit, Lisa. Other People’s Children : Cultural Conflict in the Classroom. New York : New Press ; York : Signature Book Services [distributor], 2006.

Delpit, Lisa D. Multiplication Is for White People : Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children. New York : New Press ; London : Turnaround [distributor], 2013.

McGuire, S. (2015). Teach Students How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate into Any Course to Improve Student Metacognition, Study Skills and Motivation. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

Pell Institute (2018). Indicators of Higher Education Equity in the United States – 2018 Historical Trend Report. Available at: http://pellinstitute.org/indicators/

Verschelden, C. (2017). Bandwidth Recovery: Helping Students Reclaim Cognitive Resources Lost to Poverty, Racism, and Social Marginalization. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

 

Transparency

Winkelmes, M. (2013). Transparency in teaching: Faculty share data and improve students’ learning. AAC&U Liberal Education, 99(2).

Transparency in Learning & Teaching project website: https://www.unlv.edu/provost/teachingandlearning.

Designing assignments: Creating Writing Assignments for Undergraduate Students 
https://ugs.utexas.edu/sig/essentials/writing/creating-assig ...

 

High-Impact Practices

https://www.aacu.org/resources/high-impact-practices

 

Teaching for Transfer

The following two articles offer great strategies for engaging metacognition, a skill that greatly enhances the transfer of learning from a familiar context to a new context:
https://www.aacu.org/publications-research/periodicals/think-about-your-thinking-reclaiming-foundation-liberal-education
https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/metacognition/

This article includes many useful links.
https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1144&context=ij-sotl

This article includes both metacognition and metaaffective reflection.
https://www.aacu.org/peerreview/2017/Winter/Tinberg

This article reviews several scholars on teaching for transfer.
Bransford, John. How People Learn : Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press, c2000

 

Assessment Strategies

Walvoord, Barbara E.Fassler. Assessment Clear and Simple : A Practical Guide for Institutions, Departments, and General Education. San Francisco, Calif. : Jossey-Bass, c2010

Suskie, Linda A. Assessing Student Learning : A Common Sense Guide. San Francisco, California : Jossey-Bass, c2009

 

Classroom Presentations

How to Avoid Death by Powerpoint, David JP Phillips.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iwpi1Lm6dFo

 

Teaching First-Year Students

The following bibliography has been created over many years, and includes seminal articles and books on engaging and teaching students in the first year of college.

Albert, L., Gardner, J., Hollander, E., & Zlotkowski, E. (2000). Linking citizenship & scholarship through service learning: A national imperative (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Angelo, T., Lopez, C., Suskie, L., & Swing, R. (2002). The first-year of college: Assessing what we value (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Astin, A. (1975). Preventing students from dropping out. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Astin, A. (1977). Four critical years: Effects of college on beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Astin. A. (1993). What matters in college? Four critical years revisited. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Astin, A., & Associates. (1998). The American freshman: Thirty-year trends. Los Angeles, CA: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA Graduate School of Education.

Astin, A.W., Gardner, J. N., & Sax, L. J. (1998). The changing American college student: Implications for the freshman year and beyond (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Astin, A., Knefelkamp, L., Levine, A., Wilson, R., & Upcraft, M. L. (1991). Perspectives on the freshman year, volume 1 (Monograph No. 2). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource for The Freshman Year Experience.

Bachner, D. J., Malone, L. J., & Snider, M. C. (2001). Learning interdependence: A case study of the international/intercultural education of first-year college students. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Banta, T.W. (2001). Learning Communities Illustrate Principles of Good Practice. Published in Assessment Update.

Barefoot, B. O. (1993a). A nationwide focus on freshmen. The Keystone (Newsletter of the Wadsworth College Success Series)(spring), p. 9.

Barefoot, B. O. (Ed.). (1993b). Exploring the evidence: Reporting outcomes of freshman seminars (Monograph No. 11). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Barefoot, B. O. (2000). The first-year experience: Are we making it any better? About Campus, 5, 12-18.

Barefoot, B. O., Berman, D., Gardner, J. N., Henscheid, J., Hunter, M. S., & Swing, R. (2001). Strengthening first-year seminars: A foundation for student success (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Barefoot, B.O., Gardner, J. N., et al. (Eds.). (2005). Achieving and Sustaining Institutional Excellence for the First Year of College. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.

Barefoot, B., & Fidler, P. (1996). 1994 national survey of freshman seminar programs: Continuing innovations in the collegiate curriculum (Monograph No. 20). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Barefoot, B., Warnock, C., Dickinson, M., Richardson, S., & Roberts, M. (Eds.). (1998). Exploring the evidence: Reporting outcomes of first-year seminars vol. 2 (Monograph No. 25). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Beal, P., & Noel, L. (1980). What works in student retention. Iowa City, Iowa : The American College Testing Program.

Beaudin, B. Q., Roth, R. L., Greenwood, J. H., Jr., & Boudreau, L. A. (2002). Science cohort model: Expanding the pipeline for science majors. Journal of the First Year and Students in Transition, 14(2), 105-132.

Berman, D., Clark, J., & Lerch, R. (2001). Transitions: Handbook for University 101 students. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Blake, H., Hunter, M. S., Mellow, G., & Schneider, C. (2002). The changing mosaic: Designing successful experiences for the new American college student (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Blanc, R. A., Debuhr, L. E., & Martin, D. C. (1983). Breaking the attrition cycle: The effects of supplemental instruction on undergraduate performance and attrition. Journal of Higher Education, 54(1), 80-90.

Bowen, H. (1997). Investment in learning: The individual and social value of American higher education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Boyer, E. (1987). College: The undergraduate experience in America. New York: Harper & Row.

Boyer, E. L., & Kaplan, M. (1977). Educating for survival. New Rochelle, NY: Change Magazine Press.

Boyer, E. L., & Levine, A. (1981). A quest for common learning: The aims of general education. Washington, D.C.: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Brookfield, S. D. (1990). The skillful teacher. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Brookfield, S., Tobias, S., Hartel, W., Rendon, L., & Boyer, E. (1992). Perspectives on the freshman year volume 2 (Monograph No. 8). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year.

Brower, A. M. (1992). The second half of student integration: The effects of life task predominance on student persistence. The Journal of Higher Education, 63, 441-462.

Bucher, R. D. (2000). Diversity consciousness: Opening our minds to people, cultures, and opportunities. New Jersey: Prentice Hall Publishers.

“Building Communities: The lessons of campus communication at the University of Oregon” (1995). The Freshman Year Experience Newsletter, 7(4), pp. 7-9.

Carriuolo, N., & Associates. (1996). School-college collaboration: A way of redesigning the educational pipeline (Monograph No. 16). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Chickering, A. W. (1974). Commuting versus resident students: Overcoming educational inequalities of living off campus. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Chickering, A. W., & Garrison, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39. Retrieved from http://www.aahe.org/bulletin/sevenprinciples1987.htm.

Crissman Ishler, J. L., & Schreiber, S. (2002). First-year female students: Perceptions of friendship. Journal of the First Year and Students in Transition, 14(2), 89-104.

Cuseo, J. (1991). The freshman orientation seminar: A research-based rationale for its value, delivery, and content (Monograph No. 4). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Cuseo, J. (2002). Organizing to collaborate: A taxonomy of higher education practices for promoting interdpendence with in the classroom, across the campus, and beyond the college. Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

Cuseo, J. (2003). Comprehensive support for students during the first year of college. In G. L Kramer & Associates, Student academic services: An integrated approach (pp. 271-310). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cuseo, J., Williams, M., & Wu, S. (1990). Program assessment of the freshman seminar. (Institutional research report). Marymount College, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA.

Daly, W. (1995). Beyond critical thinking: Teaching the thinking skills necessary to academic and professional success (Monograph 17). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Experience and Students in Transition.

Dwinell, P., & Higbee, J. (Eds.). (1998). Developmental education and its role in preparing successful college students (Monograph No. 24). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

E-Source: For College Transitions (Aug 2003 - present). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Education Resource Information Center (1996). The freshman year initiative: Creating academic communities for students and faculty at the community college. U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement.

Ellis, D. B., & Gardner, J. N. (1997) A meeting of the minds: Two perspectives on new student seminars (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Ellis, D. B., & Gardner, J. N. (1998). Teaching new student seminars: Classroom strategies for student retention (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Erickson, B. L., & Strommer, D. W. (1991). Teaching college freshmen. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.

Feldman, R. S. (Ed.) (2005). Improving the First Year of College: Research and Practice. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Fidler, P. P., & Fidler, D. S. (1991). First national survey on freshman seminar programs: Findings, conclusions, and recommendations. Monograph Series No. 6. National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina.

Fidler, D. S., & Henscheid, J. M. (2001) Primer for research on the college student experience. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Fidler, P. P., & Hunter, M. S. (1989). How seminars enhance student success. In M. L. Upcraft, J. N. Gardner, and Associates, The freshman year experience (pp. 216-237). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Fidler, P., & Godwin, M. (1994). Retaining African-American students through the freshman seminar. Journal of Developmental Education 17(3), 34-40.

The First-Year Experience Newsletter. (1988-April 2003). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

“First-Year Honors Students Report their Interests and Needs” (1994). The Freshman Year Experience Newsletter, 6(3), p. 3.

Fox, R. N. (1986). Application of a conceptual model of college withdrawal to disadvantaged students. American Educational Research Journal, 23, 415-424.

Friedlander, J. (1980). Are college support programs and services reaching high-risk students? Journal of College Student Personnel, 21(1), 23-28.

Fries-Britt, S., Gardner, J., Low, L., & Tinto, V. (2002). Retaining students: New questions and fresh perspectives (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Gardner, J. N. (1980). University 101: A concept for improving university teaching and learning. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina. (Eric Reproduction No. 192 706)

Gardner, J. N. (1981). Developing faculty as facilitators and mentors. New Directions for Student Services, 14, 67-80.

Gardner, J. N. (1986). The freshman year experience. College and University, 61, 261-274.

Gardner, J. N. (1986). The freshman year experience. The Journal of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, 61(4), 261-274.

Gardner, J. N. (1989). Starting a freshman seminar program. In M. L. Upcraft, J. N. Gardner, and Associates (pp. 238-249). The freshman year experience. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Gardner, J. N. (1992a). Freshman seminar instructor training: Guidelines for design and implementation. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Gardner, J. N. (1992b). Power to the peers. The Keystone (Newsletter of the Wadsworth College Success Series) (fall), pp. 1-3.

Gardner, J. N. (1996). Helping America's first-generation college students. About Campus, 1, 31-32.

Gardner, J. N. (1996, Fall). Power to the peers. Keystone Newsletter. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Gardner, J. N., Barefoot, B. O., & Swing, R. L. (2001). Guidelines for evaluating the first-year experience (two-year college and four-year college editions). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Gardner, J., Jacoby, B., Kuh, G., McClenney, B., & Vallejo, M. (2001). Engaging commuter students: Redesigning campuses for the majority of America's college students (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Gardner, J. N., Siegel, M. J., & Cutright, M. (Fall, 2001). Focusing on the first-year student. Priorities, 17, 1-17.

Gardner, J., Turner, J., Wechsler, H., & Wilsnack, S. (2000). Binge drinking: From understanding to action (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.Gilbert, S., Chapman, J., Dietsche, P., Grayson, P., & Gardner, J. (1997). From best intentions to best practices: The first-year experience in Canadian postsecondary education (Monograph No. 22). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Gordon, V. N. (1983). Meeting the career development needs of undecided honors students. Journal of College Student Personnel, 24(1), 82-83.

Gordon, V. N., & Grites, T. J. (1984). The freshman seminar course: Helping students succeed. Journal of College Student Personnel, 25(4), 315-320.

Gordon, V. (Ed.). (1994). Issues in advising the undecided college student (Monograph No. 15). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Hamid, S. L. (Ed.). (2001). Peer leadership: A primer on program essentials (Monograph No. 32). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Hankin, J. (Ed.). (1996). The community college: Opportunity and access for America's first-year students (Monograph No. 19). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Hattie, J., Biggs, J. & Purdie, N. (1996). Effects of learning skills interventions on student learning: A meta-analysiis. Review of Educational Research 66(2), 99-136.

Hunter, M. S., & Skipper, T. (Eds.). (1999). Solid foundations: Building success for first-year seminars through instructor training and development (Monograph No. 29). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Hyers, A. D., & Joslin, M. N. (1998). The first-year seminar as a predictor of academic achievement and persistence. Journal of The Freshman Year Experience & Students in Transition, 10(1), 7-30.

Journal of The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition. (1989-present). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Keesom, K., Woszczynski, A. & Myers, M. (2005). Women in Science and Technology: A First Year Seminar, presentation and proceedings, SAIS.

Kincaid, R. (Ed.). (1996). Student employment: Linking college and the workplace (Monograph No. 23). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

King, N. S. (1994, July). Throwing a lifeline to sinking students: A special probation section for KSC 101. Paper presented at the Seventh International Conference on The First-Year Experience. Dublin, Ireland.

Knapp, J. R., & Karabenick, S. A. (1988). Incidence of formal and informal academic help- seeking in higher education. Journal of College Student Development, 29(3), 223-227.

Knowlton, S., & Barefoot, B. (Eds.). (1999). Using national newspapers in the college classroom: Resources to improve teaching and learning (Monograph No. 28). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Koch, A. K. (2001). The first-year experience in American higher education: An annotated bibliography 3rd ed. (Monograph No. 3). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Kuh, G. (2001) Assessing what really matters to student learning: Inside the national survey of student engagement. Change, 33, 10-17, 66.

Kuh, G., Schuh, J., & Whitt, E. (Eds.) (1991). Involving colleges: Successful approaches to fostering student learning and development outside the classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Leamnson, R. N. (1995). Expanding the appeal of the orientation course. The Keystone (Newsletter of the Wadsworth College Success Series)(fall), pp. 6-7.

Leamnson, R. (1999). Thinking about teaching and learning: Developing habits of learning with first year college and university students. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Levin, M., & Levin, J. (1991). A critical examination of academic retention programs for at-risk minority college students. Journal of College Student Development, 32, 323-334.

Levine, A., & Cureton, J. (1998). When hope and fear collide: A portrait of today's college student. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Levine, J. H. (Ed.). (1999). Learning communities: New structures, new partnerships for learning (Monograph No. 26). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Levine, J., Smith, B. L., Tinto, V., & Gardner, J. (1999). Learning about learning communities: Taking student learning seriously (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Levitz, R. (1993). Putting "community" into community colleges: Non-skill-based retention targeting. Recruitment and Retention in Higher Education, 7(2), pp. 4-6.

Levitz, R. (1994). The freshman seminar: An overview. Recruitment and Retention Newsletter, 8(10), pp. 4-7.

Levitz, R., & Noel, L. (1989). Connecting students to institutions: Keys to retention and success. In M. L. Upcraft, J. N. Gardner, & Associates, The freshman year experience (pp. (65-81). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Light, R. J. (2001). Making the most of college: Students speak their minds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Martin, D., & Arendale, D. (1992). Supplemental instruction: Improving first-year student success in high-risk courses (Monograph No. 7). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Masiello, L. (1993). Write at the start: A guide to using writing in freshman seminars (Monograph No. 9). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Mentkowski, M. (2000). Learning that lasts: Integrating learning, development, and performance in college and beyond. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Miller, G. (1988). The meaning of general education. New York: Teachers College Press.

Mosher, R. L., Connor, D., Kalliel, K. M., Day, J. M., Yokota, N., Porter, M. R., & Whiteley, J. M. (1999). Moral action in young adulthood. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Mullendore, R. H., & Hatch, C. (2000). Helping your first-year college student succeed: A guide for parents. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

National Commission on the High School Senior Year. (2001). The lost opportunity of the senior year. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition. (2002). 2000 survey of first-year programming: Continuing innovations in the collegiate curriculum (Monograph No. 35). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

National Survey of Student Engagement. The NSSE report improving the college experience: National benchmarks of effective educational practice. Bloomington, IN: National Survey of Student Engagement. Retrieved from http://www.indiana.edu/~nsse/

Noel, L., Levitz, R., Saluri, D., & Associates (1985). Increasing student retention. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Palmer, J. C. (1982). Sources and information. In B. L. Johnson (Ed.), General education in two- year colleges (pp. 109-118). New Directions for Community Colleges, no. 40. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Pascarella, E. T. (2005). Cognitive impacts of the first year of college. In R. S. Feldman (Ed.), Improving the First Year of College (pp. 111-140). Mahway, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Pascarella, E. T., & Chapman, D. W. (1983). Validation of a theoretical model of college withdrawal: Interaction effects in a multi-institutional sample. Research in Higher Education, 19, 25-48.

Pascarella, E. T., & Terenzini, P. T. (1991). How college affects students. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Pascarella, E., Terenzini, P., & Wolfle, L. (1986). Orientation to college and freshman year persistence/withdrawal decisions. Journal of Higher Education, 57, 60-75.

Pence, L.E., Workman, H.J. & Haruta, M.E. (2005). A General Chemistry and Precalculus First-Year Interest Group (FIG): Effect on Retention, Skills & Attitudes. Published in Journal of Chemical Education

Prager, C. (1988). Editor's notes. In C. Prager (Ed.), Enhancing articulation and transfer (pp. 1- 6). New Directions for Community Colleges, No. 61. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Rendon, L., Terenzini, P., & Gardner, J. (1999). Meeting the challenge of student retention (Teleconference video and print resource packet). Available from the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, University of South Carolina.

Robinson, S. (2000). Gaining the competitive edge: Enriching the collegiate experience of new student athletes (Monograph No. 27). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Rudolph, R. (1977). A history of the American undergraduate course of study since 1636. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Sax, L. J., Lindholm, J. A., Astin, A. W., Korn, W. S., & Mahoney, K. M. (2001). The American freshman: National norms for fall 2001, 36th annual edition. Los Angeles, CA: University of California Los Angeles, Higher Education Research Institute.

Schilling, K. M., & Schilling, K. L. (1999). Increasing expectations for student effort. About Campus, 4.

Schnell, C. A., Louis, K. S., & Doetkott, C. (2003). The first-year seminar as a means of improving college graduation rates. Journal of the First Year and Students in Transition, 15(1), 53-76.

Schroeder, C. C. (2000). Understanding today's students in a changed world, Priorities, 15.

Simons, S. M. (1993). Against the odds: Seminar success despite elective status. The Keystone (Newsletter of the Wadsworth College Success Series), (spring), pp. 1, 4.

Smith, T. (Ed.). (1993). Gateways: Residential colleges and the freshman year experience (Monograph No. 14). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Soldner, L., Lee, Y., & Duby, P. (1999/2000). Welcome to the block: Developing freshman learning communities that work. Journal of college Student Retention 1(2), 115-129.

Spear, K. I.(Ed.)(1984). Rejuvenating introductory courses (pp. 25-38). New Directions for Teaching and Learning, no. 20. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Starke, M. C., Harth, M., & Sirianni, F. (2001). Retention, bonding, and academic achievement: Success of a first-year seminar. Journal of The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition, 13(2), 7-35.

Stassen, M. (2003). Student Outcomes: The Impact of Varying Living-Learning Community Models. Published in Research in Higher Education

Steltenpohl, E., & Shipton, J. (1986). Facilitating a successful transition to college for adults. Journal of Higher Education, 57(6), 637-657.

Stephens, J., & Eison, J. (1986-1987). A comparative investigation of honors and non-honors students. Forum for Honors, 17(1-2), 17-25.

Strumpf, G., & Sharer, G. (Eds.) (1993). National orientation directors association data bank 1993-1995. College Park, MD: University of Maryland.

Study Group on the Conditions of Excellence in American Higher Education. (1984). Involvement in learning: Realizing the potential of American higher education. Washington: National Institute of Education.

Swift, J. S., Jr., Colvin, C,, & Mills, D. (1987). Displaced homemakers: Adults returning to college with different characteristics and needs. Journal of College Student Development, 28(4), 343-350.

Swing, R. (Ed.). (2001). Proving and improving: Strategies for assessing the first college year (Monograph No. 33). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Taylor, K, with W. S. Moore, J. MacGregor, and J. Lindblad. (2003). Learning Community Research and Assessment: What We Know Now. National Learning Communities Project Monograph Series. Olympia, WA: The Evergreen State College, Washington Center for Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Education, in cooperation with the American Association for Higher Education.

Theall, M. (Ed.). (1999). Motivation from within: Approaches for encouraging faculty and students to excel. New directions for teaching and learning. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition (2nd Edition). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Tinto, V. (1997). Classrooms as communities: Exploring the educational character of student persistence. The Journal of Higher Education, 68, 599-623.

Tinto, V. (2000). Linking learning and leaving: Exploring the role of the college classroom in student departure. In J. M. Braxton (Ed.), Reworking the student departure puzzle (pp. 81-94). Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press.

Tokumo, K. A., & Campbell, F. L. (1992). The freshman interest group program at the University of Washington. Journal of The Freshman Year Experience, 4(1), 7-22.

Walling, L. (Ed.). (1996). Hidden abilities in higher education: New college students with disabilities (Monograph No. 21). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Watts, E. I. (1999, June). The freshman year experience, 1962-1990: An experiment in humanistic education. Doctoral dissertation, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada.).

Whiteley, J., & Yokota, N. (1988). Character development in the freshman year and over four years of undergraduate study (Monograph No. 1). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Wilkie, C. J., & Thompson, C. A. (1993). First-year reentry; women's perceptions of their classroom experiences. Journal of The Freshman Year Experience, 5(2), 69-90.

Wunsch, M. A. (1994). Mentoring revisited: Making an impact on individuals and institutions. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Yockey, F. A., & George, A. A. (1998). The effects of a freshman seminar paired with supplemental instruction. Journal of the First-Year Experience & Students in Transition, 10(2), 57-76.

Zeller, W., Fidler, D., & Barefoot, B. (Eds.). (1996). Residence life programs and the first year experience (2nd ed.). (Monograph No. 5). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The Freshman Year Experience.

Zlotkowski, E. (2002). Introduction. In E. Zlotkowski (Ed.), Service Learning and the First-Year Experience: Preparing Students for Personal Success and Civic Responsibility (Monograph No. 34) (pp. ix-xiv). Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

 

For More Information on Transparency:

Winkelmes, M. (2013). Transparency in teaching: Faculty share data and improve students’ learning. AAC&U Liberal Education, 99(2).

Transparency in Learning & Teaching project website: https://www.unlv.edu/provost/teachingandlearning

 

For More Information on Belonging:

Strayhorn, T. (2012). College Students’ Sense of Belonging. New York: Routledge.

Walton, G. & Cohen, G. (2011). A brief social-belonging intervention improves academic and health outcomes of minority students. Science, 331(18), 1447-1451. Available at: https://ed.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/social_belonging_intervention.pdf

Yeager, D. et al (May, 2016). Teaching a lay theory before college narrows achievement gaps at scale. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Available at:http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/05/25/1524360113.full

 

For More Information on Wise Feedback:

Cohen, G. L., Steele, C. M., and Ross, L. D. (1999). The mentor's dilemma: Providing critical feedback across the racial divide. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 25(10), 1302-1318.

Yeager, D. S., Purdie-Vaughns, V., Garcia, J., Apfel, N., Brzustoski, P., Master, A., Hessert, W. T., & Williams, M. E. (2013). Breaking the cycle of mistrust: Wise interventions to provide critical feedback across the racial divide. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143, 804-824.

https://www.interventioncentral.org/student_motivation_wise_feedback

 

For More Information about Basic Needs Statements: 

https://medium.com/@saragoldrickrab/basic-needs-security-and-the-syllabus-d24cc7afe8c9

https://www.aacu.org/publications-research/periodicals/think-about-your-thinking-reclaiming-foundation-liberal-education

https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/metacognition/

Last Updated: 11/9/18