Provost's Office

College of Education 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog

Print Version

JUDITH HERB COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Administration
Tom Brady, Interim Dean

Phone: 419.530.2026

Virginia L. Keil, Associate Dean for
Undergraduate Studies and Accreditation
Phone: 419.530.2491

Robert F. Sullivan, Interim Associate Dean for
Graduate Studies and Research
Phone: 419.530.2467

Academic Departments
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Leigh Chiarelott, Chair

Phone: 419.530-5373

Department of Early Childhood, Physical and Special Education
Richard Welsch, Interim Chair

Phone: 419.530.7736

Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership
William Gray, Interim Chair

Phone: 419.530.2565

Academic Support Services
Office of Student Services
Gillham Hall 3100

Phone: 419.530.2495
Fax: 419.530.7248
Academic advising, student field placements, college recruiting

Accreditation
The teacher education programs at The University of Toledo are accredited by the
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and approved by theOhio Board of Regents. They meet state of Ohio standards for licensure, standards of the respective national professional associations, and NCATE standards for program accreditation.

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Undergraduate Programs
The Judith Herb College of Education offers undergraduate and graduate teacher education programs to meet the 1998 Ohio Teacher Education and Licensure Standards for initial teacher licensure. In some cases, programs are offered in collaboration with the College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Health Sciences and Human Services. Programs in the department of music are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music.

The following undergraduate programs are open to students seeking teacher licensure:

Early Childhood Education
Ages 3-8/grades PreK-3 for children who are typically developing, at-risk and gifted, and who have mild/moderate educational needs.

Special Education (Intervention Specialist)
Mild/Moderate Special Needs: Ages 5-21/grades K-12

Moderate/Intensive Special Needs: Ages 5-21/grades K-12

Visually Impaired: Ages 3-21/grades PreK-12

Middle Childhood Education
Ages 8-14/grades 4-9 with two of the following concentrations:

Reading and Language Arts

Mathematics

Science

Social Studies

Adolescence to Young Adult Education
Ages 12-21/grades 7-12 in each of the following areas:

Integrated Language Arts

Integrated Mathematics

Integrated Social Studies

Science (nine options)

Multiage Education
Ages 3-21/grades PreK-12 in each of the following areas:

Visual Arts

Music

Physical Education

Health

Foreign Languages (French, German and Spanish)

Graduate Programs
The Judith Herb College of Education also offers graduate programs for initial teacher licensure and for certification/licensure endorsement.

Refer to the
Graduate School for information on programs and policies specifically related to graduate students.

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Degrees Offered
The following undergraduate degrees are available to students in the Judith Herb College of Education and are conferred by The University of Toledo:

Bachelor of Education

Bachelor of Arts in Education

Bachelor of Science in Education

The teacher education programs listed above may offer students the option of earning a bachelor of education degree and a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree from the College of Arts and Sciences. In this instance, special program conditions exist, and students must check with faculty advisers for specific course and program requirements.

Students who wish to pursue the Bachelor of Arts in education or Bachelor of Science in education degree must complete the following:
1. University core and other general education requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Judith Herb College of Education.

2. Major field requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences and the content major requirements as specified by the Judith Herb College of Education.

3. Professional education requirements.

Ordinarily, these programs exceed the 128 minimum credit hours required for bachelor’s degrees and, therefore, take longer than four academic years (8 full-time equivalent semesters) to complete.

Admission Requirements
Application for admission to the Judith Herb College of Education must be submitted to the
Office of Undergraduate Admission.

Students who are eligible for initial admission to the college are not guaranteed admission to the professional education program in the junior year. All licensure programs have specific additional requirements for admission to professional education.

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Readmission of Former Students
Undergraduate students who discontinue course work for a period of at least one academic year (not including summer) must request readmission to the University. If students have taken any course work at another institution during the time they have been away from the University (other than transient status), they must complete a new application in the Office of Undergraduate Admission and meet transfer admission requirements.

Students who have not taken course work for more than 12 months must comply with the college requirements at the time of readmission. When seeking readmission, students whose grade point average (GPA) is below 2.0 can only be readmitted on approval of the associate dean. Students with a GPA of 2.0 or higher may seek readmission in the college office.

Admission of Transfer Students
Students in good standing may transfer with the following minimum requirements from another college at The University of Toledo or from other accredited colleges and universities:

Number of credit hours. Minimum required GPA 
Less than 30 2.3 overall
30-59 2.5 overall
60 or more 2.7 overall and 2.7 in student’s major

Students wishing to transfer from another college on campus to the Judith Herb College of Education must not have been suspended prior to or during the semester in which the student initiates transfer proceedings. If suspended from another baccalaureate college, the student must fulfill requirements of the suspension policy of that college.

Students with satisfactory records from other accredited colleges and universities may enroll in the Judith Herb College of Education after review of official transcripts and admission into the college. After the transfer process has been completed, the student is notified of the allowed transfer credit.

Degree Requirements
Candidates for degrees in the Judith Herb College of Education must complete a minimum of 128 undergraduate credit hours of course work. Students completing degree programs in teacher education must attain a minimum overall higher education GPA of 2.7, as well as maintain the same average in their teaching major and professional education courses prior to enrolling in internship/student teaching. The cumulative average includes all grades for credits earned, plus grades of IN and F and those acquired in repeated courses at The University of Toledo and at other institutions that the student attended.

Students may qualify for a second bachelor’s degree in the Judith Herb College of Education by completing a minimum of 32 credit hours of additional residence course work and by satisfying the applicable bachelor’s degree requirements and state requirements.

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University Core Curriculum
Students earning bachelor’s or associate’s degrees in all University colleges and programs are required to complete the University Core Curriculum. Those courses are distributed in the areas of English composition, mathematics, humanities/fine arts, social sciences, natural sciences and multicultural studies (see the General Section of this catalog for details). Some colleges and programs require courses in these areas over and above those required to fulfill University core requirements. The student’s academic department or college office should be contacted for specific details.

Residence Requirement
Students transferring from other institutions must earn at least 32 credit hours in the Judith Herb College of Education at The University of Toledo to be eligible for graduation and/or licensure.

Junior- and senior-level courses in professional education must be completed in residence for students completing teacher education programs.

Application for Graduation
See the UT Policy web site for additional information.

College Honors Programs
The University Honors Program in the Judith Herb College of Education offers academically gifted students the opportunity to take especially challenging courses and to work closely with faculty to achieve personal goals. Honors courses are small and encourage advanced inquiry, reasoning and discussion. Special academic counseling, field experience mentoring, priority registration and research opportunities are additional features of the Honors Program.

Admission Criteria
Admission to the University Honors Program normally requires a minimum high school GPA of 3.75 on a 4.0 scale, a minimum ACT composite score of 28, and application materials, which include an essay on an assigned topic, a personal resume and written recommendations. Interested students with ACT scores of 25 and GPAs of 3.5 are encouraged to apply and will be considered on a space-available basis.

Academic Requirements
To remain in the college’s Honors Program, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 and must continue to make adequate progress toward completing the program requirements.

Program Requirements
To be eligible for the college’s honors citation upon graduation, a student must:

1. Complete a minimum of 33 semester hours of honors course work, including six hours of Honors Readings Conference during the first year and two honors interdisciplinary seminars;

2. Submit a supervised honors thesis; and

3. Achieve a final GPA of 3.3.

Note:
When honors sections of courses are not available, courses may be converted into honors courses by developing a learning contract with the instructor. Forms are available in the college office or from the honors adviser.

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General Academic Policies

GPA Recalculation
Student who have retaken a course and earned a higher grade may petition to have the first grade excluded from grade point average. Credit will only be awarded once for repeated courses. If a grade has been deleted that grade will not be used in determining the UT grade point average. However, all grades, including those for repeated courses, will be included in the determination of eligibility for graduation honors, fellowships, or other distinctions awarded on the basis of GPA. No more than a total of 12 semester hours of course work will be deleted.

Academic Suspension
Suspended students are denied enrollment from The University of Toledo for a period of at least one semester. Refer to the
UT Policy web site for additional information on academic suspension.

Once the suspension is served, the student desiring readmission to the college must appeal in writing to the department chair at least three weeks prior to registration for the semester in which attendance is desired. Suspended students who are granted readmission must maintain the designated GPA for each semester thereafter. See adviser to complete an academic contract. Students failing to meet these conditions are subject to academic dismissal. The dean’s decision on dismissal is final.

A student suspended twice from the college will not be permitted to enroll in classes at the University for one full calendar year from the date of second suspension.

Students are required to remove incomplete grades during suspension periods.

Dismissal
Dismissed students are not eligible for readmission to the Judith Herb College of Education. A student may be dismissed for:

1. Failing to meet the conditions of readmission after suspension from the Judith Herb College of Education.

2. Demonstrating patterns of behavior that are inappropriate for students preparing for educational roles or for failing to meet the morals standard as defined by the state of Ohio.

Regulations for probation, suspension and dismissal apply to both full-time and part-time students. In all matters, the dean’s decision is final.

Academic Honesty
Refer to the
UT Policy web site for further information on Academic Honesty. 

Academic Grievances: Due Process
Students have the responsibility and right to call to the attention of a professor any grade that the student believes to be in error. Such attention must follow the procedure described. This procedure must be initiated within 60 days of the posting of the grade report.

1. The student meets with the instructor to attempt to resolve the problem.

2. If the procedure in step 1 does not resolve the problem, the student may request intercession by the departmental chair. The chair attempts to resolve the problem, but the chair may not unilaterally change the grade.

3. Should the problem not be resolved at the department level, the student may appeal in writing to the associate dean. This written document must specifically state the reasons for the appeal and the desired outcome. The student must meet with the associate dean to review and discuss the problem, but a decision will not be rendered here.

4. If the student wishes to continue the appeal, the written appeal will be submitted to the academic affairs committee.

5. The academic affairs committee will appoint an appeals subcommittee that will collect all data related to the appeal, in writing, and will interview the student and/or instructor, if necessary, to make a recommendation to the associate dean. All proceedings and deliberations of the committee will remain in confidence.

6. The appeals subcommittee will inform the chair of the college academic affairs committee of the recommendation.

7. The dean will make the final decision and will be responsible for informing all appropriate parties.

8. A further appeal can be taken by the faculty member or student to the University academic appeals committee.

Students who seek recourse for allegations relative to academic problems should consult the following sources:
UT Policy and Procedures, Student Handbook and the Student Teacher Handbook. Graduate students should refer to the grievance policy of the Graduate School.

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Teacher Education Programs
Degree and Licensure Requirements

Candidates for the Bachelor of Education degree in any of the professional education programs must complete a minimum of 128 credit hours of course work with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 on a 4.0 scale. Students also must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.7 or better in all professional education courses and in all teaching fields. The cumulative average includes all grades for credits earned plus grades of IN and F and those acquired in repeated courses at The University of Toledo and at other institutions that the student attended.

Undergraduate programs in the Judith Herb College of Education meet all University of Toledo requirements for the bachelor’s degree. Some meet requirements for the B.Ed. and the B.A. or B.S. degree. They also meet all state of Ohio, national professional association and NCATE standards for program accreditation and initial professional licensure. Programs vary in length depending on licensure area.

DUAL DEGREE ONLY
Integrated Mathematics

Single Degree Option
Adolescent/Young Adult (AYA)
Integrated Language Arts (ILA)
Integrated Social Studies
Science (9 options)
Middle Childhood Education
Multiage Education:
Foreign Languages (French,
German or Spanish)
Health Education
Physical Education Special Educ. Intervention Specialist

SINGLE DEGREE ONLY
Early Childhood Education

Integrated Language Arts

Integrated Social Studies

Sciences

Multiage Education:

Music Education

Visual Arts Education

*Students who satisfy one of the two multicultural requirements with one course that simultaneously fulfills a second area of the core will graduate with 129 hours.

Students who successfully complete all college degree requirements, student teaching/internship and licensure exams will be recommended for a two-year provisional teaching license in Ohio. For additional information on licensure requirements, students should inquire in the college.

The above policy reflects not only college action, but also the requirements of NCATE. In addition, the State of Ohio requires students to submit fingerprinting cards to the Bureau of Criminal Investigation before a professional license will be issued.

Criteria and Procedures for Admission to Professional Education
To be eligible for advanced professional admission to a teacher licensure program, a student must demonstrate:

1. Current enrollment in the Judith Herb College of Education;

Note: Students should apply for admission to professional education no later than the fifth semester of full-time enrollment. Students in the respective licensure programs should apply while enrolled in the following respective courses:

Early Childhood Education CIEC 3200 Philosophy and Practices
Special Education
SPED 4240 Teaching Reading & Literacy: Special Needs
Middle Childhood Education
CI 3240:001 or CI 3240:002 Best Practices in Middle Level Education
Visual Art Education, Music
EDP 3200 Applied Psychology for Teaching Education
Physical Education
PED 2950 Intro to Teaching PE
Health Education
HEAL 2900 Linking Seminar HEAL 2000
Foreign Languages Education
CI 2980 Foreign Language Linking Seminar 2 or equivalent course
Adolescent and Young Adult Education –
see advisor
2. Completion of a minimum of 48 credit hours of approved course work, including pre-professional education courses and 12 hours in residence;
3. Cumulative GPA (for transfer students, a higher education GPA) of at least 2.7;

4. Mastery of reading, writing and mathematics skills as evidenced by minimum scores on PRAXIS I skills tests as follows:

WRITTEN COMPUTER ADAPTED
Mathematics 172 172
Reading 172 172
Writing 172 172
Note: PRAXIS I should be taken no later than the student’s third semester of full-time enrollment.
5. Acceptable progress in arts and science licensure content courses or published criteria;
6. Prior experience with appropriate populations in schools and agencies based on satisfactory completion of introductory courses/seminars, letters of support and/or portfolios;
7. Effective communication and interpersonal skills based on early experiences, introductory course/seminar(s), ratings from professionals in the field and/or interview ratings;
8. Verification of good moral character as stipulated by the state of Ohio. Students will not be allowed to continue in a teacher education major or participate in a field experience if they have pleaded guilty to, have been found guilty of, or have been convicted of the following: any felony; any violation of section 2907.07 of the Revised Code; any offense as defined in section 2901.01 of the Revised Code; any offense as defined in section 2913.01 of the Revised Code; or any drug abuse offense as defined in section 2905.01 of the Revised Code that is not a minor misdemeanor; or any substantively comparable ordinance of a municipal corporation or of another state. Students in teacher education licensure programs who are negatively affected by the state of Ohio laws as stated in the Revised Code should contact the associate dean for undergraduate studies and accreditation for assistance; and
9. Completion of additional published program admission criteria, if any.

Each licensure program will determine those eligible for advanced professional admission. Students will apply for and be notified of admission to professional education after a minimum of 48 to 72 credit hours of completed program course work. Students not admitted may reapply when identified deficiencies have been corrected.

IMPORTANT: Each undergraduate licensure program will establish a set of guidelines and procedures that students seeking admission to professional education will follow. Students should contact the department chair, adviser or department secretary for assistance.

Academic Requirements
Students must maintain the required GPA (as outlined in the admission criteria) and complete satisfactorily the professional education courses and field experiences with a grade of C or above in each in order to maintain full admission status.

Students with Transfer Credit
Transfer students are required to complete all course work at The University of Toledo with a minimum of a 2.7 GPA overall, in professional education, and in all teaching fields. In addition, they must meet all requirements for admission to the professional education programs as outlined above. The GPA standards are for The University of Toledo course work, as well as for all other college course work attempted.

Transfer students must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours at The University of Toledo and must complete a minimum total of 48 credit hours of course work before applying for admission to professional education. Students are responsible for initiating this application.

Field/Clinical Experiences
Students who intend to be teachers can expect to spend extensive amounts of time in schools and community agencies as they progress through required professional courses and internship experiences. Introductory courses and exploratory seminars offered to students in the pre-teacher education program may include field experiences. Students will be required to assemble portfolio evidence of experience as they progress through their programs. Students must submit to a background check and fingerprinting.

Student Teaching/Internship Requirements
To qualify for an assignment in student teaching/internship, a student must satisfy the following requirements:

1. Full admission to professional education;

2. Completion of a minimum of 100 credit hours;

3. Completion of 90 percent of the course work in the major area(s) of study;

4. Completion of all required prerequisite professional education courses including methods course(s) and satisfactory completion of all field experiences;

5. A minimum GPA of 2.7 in major(s)/licensure area(s), professional education, University of Toledo GPA, and overall as determined by the overall higher education GPA; and

6. Meeting Ohio’s good moral character requirement.

Admission to Student Teaching/Internships
Admission to student teaching/internships will be determined by program faculty in cooperation with the college Office of Student Services. Students submit applications for student teaching/internships to the Office of Student Services. Applications must be submitted one year in advance.

Each student’s credentials are reviewed and a preliminary recommendation is made. Final approval will not be granted until all course work and grades are reviewed during the semester immediately preceding the internship. A student must meet all minimum criteria and be approved by the departmental committee in order to begin student teaching/internship.

Student Teaching/Internship Assignments
The staff of the Office of Student Services makes the assignment in keeping with the best learning situation for the individual student. Student teaching/internship is not offered in the summer, because it is not possible for students to complete the equivalent requirement.

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Licensure
Licensure Tests

All students completing a teacher education licensure program are required to complete a series of licensure tests. These tests have been approved by the Ohio Department of Education and NCATE. The required tests are listed below.

1. Pre-professional Skills Test (Praxis I) –
Students are required to take the Praxis I and successfully pass all sections prior to full admission to professional education. It is recommended this test be taken between completion of 32 and 64 credit hours of course work, either at a designated on-campus site or at a local testing center. Students are responsible for all test fees. Students may be permitted to retake one or more sections of the test and must pay all fees. Before retaking a test, a student should consult with an academic adviser for remedial assistance.
2. Praxis II –
The state of Ohio has adopted a series of licensure tests that all teacher education students must satisfactorily complete in order to be recommended for licensure. Tests are required in professional education and the subject content area(s). Students are required to register for these exams and to pay all testing fees. Information about tests, testing dates and location, test preparation, and passing scores may be found in the departmental offices and in the college office.
3. Other –
Performance assessments will be used throughout the program to evaluate students' performance and to provide information on the quality of the program.

Recommendation for Licensure
Licensure to teach in the fields selected is made only upon the recommendation of the dean of the Judith Herb College of Education. The dean will recommend licensure to the Ohio State Department of Education only in the teaching fields in which the student meets all requirements as defined in this catalog.

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Academic Program Requirements
The following program descriptions provide a general outline of each major program. Program degree audits are available online and provide specific individual course requirements and options for each majo
r. Students should use the audit to keep a record of completion of the respective program requirements.

For all single degree programs, the student must complete 128 to 161 total hours. With dual degree programs, all students must complete 148 to 217 total hours. Students should see an adviser for additional information on specific program requirements.

Early Childhood Education
The early childhood education programs prepare students to work with children who are typically developing, at-risk, gifted and mild-moderate special needs infants, toddlers, preschoolers, kindergartners and primary students in a variety of settings (ages 3-8/grades PreK-3).

University Core and General Education: 36 hours minimum
Pre-professional Education: 27 hours

(Must be completed prior to making application for professional standing)

EDU 1700
EDP 3200
ETPT 2020
CIEC 3200
CIEC 4340
EDP 3210
SPED 2040
TSOC 2000
CI 4980
(See adviser for sequencing)

Cognate Courses: 9 hours
(Must be completed before the final three semesters of the program – professional standing not required)

MED 3030**
AED 3100
PED 2450
HEAL 3100
**Has a prerequisite of MUS 2200 or comparable experience.
Area of Concentration

Mathematics (choose 4 of the following)
MATH 1830, 1840, 2600 and 2620
CI 4550

Science (choose 4 of the following)
Life Science

BIOL 1120
EEES 2150 and 2160

Select courses from each of the following areas:
Chemistry/Physics
CHEM 1120 or
NASC 1100 and 1110

Earth/Space Science
EEES 1010 and 1020 or
ASTR 1010 and 2050

Social Studies (12 hours)
HIST 2010 and 2020

Select 2 courses out of the following
CI 4710
PSC 1200
GEPL 4040
ECON 1010
ANTH 2800
PSY 3010

Language Arts (choose 12 hours)
ENGL 2760, 3150, 3790
ENGL 2720 or 2730
or 4090

Cohort Semesters: 60 hours (final four semesters in the program)
Professional standing required – students must register for
all courses listed under each cohort semester. See adviser for sequencing of courses.
CIEC 3350, 3380, 4480, 4070, 4550, 4460, 4750, 4770, 4930 and 4900
CI 3430, 3460, 4980 and 4510
GIFT 4100
SPED 4080

*Must be in the same section

Important Reminders:
A background check must be completed during CIEC 3200 in order to take CIEC 4340. Praxis I must be successfully completed before admission to professional education. A minimum 2.7 GPA must be achieved before admission to professional education.
Please see your academic adviser prior to applying for professional education. After being admitted to the upper division, you will be assigned a faculty adviser. It is important that you meet with your faculty adviser once you’ve been accepted to professional education.
Praxis II should be taken during Cohort III and must be successfully completed to be recommended for licensure.

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Special Education (Intervention Specialist)
Programs in special education prepare pre-service baccalaureate students for initial teacher licensure as intervention specialists. These specialists work with students ages 5-21/grades K-12) with mild/moderate or moderate/intensive educational needs. These include children and youth with specific learning disabilities, mental retardation, autism, physical and health impairments, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders, emotional disturbance, and communication and language difficulties. Graduates also may be prepared to work with students (ages 3-21/grades PreK-12) with vision impairment. Preparation for early intervention special education and adult services occur at the graduate level. Majors in this program are prepared to teach in a variety of settings where services are provided to students requiring specialized interventions to experience success in the education environment.

University Core and General Education: 30 hours minimum
Additional Requirements: 32 hours

EDU 1700
English (above Comp II)
Foreign Language (must take one area – sign language accepted)
Humanities/Fine Arts (see advisor)
Social Science

Pre-professional Education: 13 hours

(Must be completed prior to submitting an application for professional standing.)
ETPT 2020
SPED 2040, 2910, 3130 and 4240

Students must complete the PRAXIS I exam and receive the minimum score of 172 in each area, as required by the Judith Herb College of Education, and complete 48 hours with a 2.7 GPA or higher.

Related Coursework: 18 hours
AED 4140

CI 3430 (see advisor)

EDP 3200 or 3280

EDP 3290

HEAL 4400

TSOC 3000

Final Semester/Senior Year (concurrent enrollment):
SPED 4930 and 4600

Options: Select one of the following:

Mild-Moderate Intervention Specialist: 27 hours
CI 4000 and 4010
SPED 4060
SPED 4250
SPED 4260
SPED 4100 and 4370
SPED 4110
SPEC 4340

Moderate-Intensive Intervention Specialist: 29 hours
SLP 4440 (see advisor)
SPED 3670, 4120 and 4130
SPED 4340
SPED 4110
SPED 4060
SPED 4250
SPED 4260

Vision Intervention Specialist: 42 hours
CI 4000 and 4010
SPED 3850, 3860, 4100, 4800, 4810, 4870 and 4880
SPED 4110
SPED 4340
SPED 4060
SPED 4250
SPED 4260

School Speech-Language Pathology
Licensure in speech-language pathology requires completion of a master’s degree, both for school and clinical practice. The undergraduate program provides a significant portion of the total baccalaureate-master’s preparation program. Students interested in this program should consult the departmental chair or undergraduate dean in the College of Health Sciences and Human Services.

Middle Childhood Education
The middle childhood education program prepares students to teach elementary middle grade, middle school and junior high students in two licensure areas to be chosen from the following: reading and language arts, mathematics, social studies, and/or science (ages 8-14/grades 4-9).

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Single Degree: B.Ed.
University Core and General Education: 27 hours minimum

Pre-professional Education 21 hours

EDU 1700

ETPT 2020

SPED 2040
CI 4980
HEAL 4400
CI 3240
CI 3440

Professional Education: 45 hours
Select the
two methods courses that correspond to your licensure areas from the list below:
CI 4250, 4260, 4270 and 4280,
CI 4290
CI 4000
CI 4010
CI 4400, 4930 and 4990
AED/MED 4230
COUN 4580
EDP 3200
TSOC 3000
CI 4980

Licensure Areas: Select two
Students will concentrate in two licensure areas and will complete course work in each area.

Mathematics: 26 hours
MATH 1830, 1840, 2600, 2620, 3440, 3510 and 3920
CI 4550

Reading and Language Arts: 24 hours
ENGL 3150, 2760, 2730, 2720, 3790 and 4090
CI 4320 and 4360

Science: 29 hours
Life Sciences
BIOL 1120
EEES 2150 and 2160

Chemistry
CHEM 1120

Physics
NASC 1100 and 1110 or
PHYS 1750

Earth/Space Science
ASTR 1010
EEES 1010, 1020 and 2400
GEPL 4540

Social Studies: 33 hours
Related Content Area
ECON 1010

PSC 1200

PSC 1710

GEPL 3050

Economics (select one course from the following)
ECON 1150 or 1200

Behavioral Sciences (select one course from each of the following disciplines)
ANTH 1020 or 2800
SOC 1010, 1750, 2100 or 2640
PSY 1010, 2500 or 3200

U.S. History (select two from the following)
HIST 2010, 2020, 2340, 3310, 4430 and 3600

European History (select one from the following)
HIST 1010, 1020 or 4100

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Dual Degree B.Ed and B.A
Students wishing to earn the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in general studies may do so by completing all the requirements outlined above and, in addition, complete the following:

Additional General Education
Foreign Language 1110
Foreign Language 1120
or 1500
Foreign Language 2140
Foreign Language 2150
Humanities/Fine Arts (see adviser for specific disciplines)
Natural Science
Social Science

Students are required to complete
two "Writing across the Curriculum" courses, at least one of which must be completed within the student’s licensure areas, and no more than one may be taken to fulfill the University Core Curriculum. These courses are designated by the letters ‘WAC’ appearing after the course title in the Schedule of Classes, e.g., GEPL 2030 Cultural Geography - WAC.

Please visit your adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences; only he/she can approve the course work necessary to fulfill the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree.

Adolescence to Young Adult Education
The adolescent program prepares students to teach junior high and high school students, grades 7-12, in a single academic area – integrated language arts, integrated mathematics, integrated social studies, or one of the science options.

Dual-degree adolescence to young adult programs lead to the bachelor of education degree and to the appropriate Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree:

 Integrated mathematics – B.Ed. and B.A., mathematics

Single Degree adolescence to young adult programs leading to the bachelor of education degree:

 Sciences
Integrated Language Arts
Integrated Social Studies

Dual Degree Programs (B.Ed. and B.A. or B.S.)
University Core and General Education: 33 hours

Additional General Education: 23-29 hours

Foreign Language 1110
Foreign Language 1120 or 1500
Foreign Language 2140
Foreign Language 2150
Humanities/Fine Arts (literature, history, and fine arts)
Natural Science
Social Science

WAC: 6 hours (Select two courses)

Students are required to complete two "Writing across the Curriculum" (WAC) courses. Courses vary from year-to-year and are listed on the registrar’s Web site. Courses also can be selected in consultation with the arts and sciences adviser. One course must be from your content area and the other course in content or out.

Pre-professional Education: 12 hours
EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
SPED 2040
TSOC 3000

Integrated Mathematics
Professional Education: 38 hours

CI 3240:003 or: 004 and CI 3110
CI 4130
CI 4160 and 4190
CI 4490
CI 4570, 4910 and 4930
EDP 3250/EDP 3200

Mathematics Content: 49 hours
MATH 1780

MATH 1830 or 1850
MATH 1840 or 1860
MATH 1890
MATH 2850
MATH 3190
MATH 3320 or 4330
MATH 3610 or 4680
MATH 3860
MATH 3200, 3440, 3450, 3510, 4300 and 4380
CI 4550
Note: At least three mathematics courses must be taken at the 4000 level. At least one class must be taken with Maple, or students should take MATH 1780 separately.

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Single Degree Programs (B.Ed)

Sciences
Students should choose one from the five listed:

Pre-Professional Education: 12 hours

EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
SPED 2040
TSOC 3000

Professional Education: 38 hours
EDP 3250/ 3200
CI 3240: 003 or: 004 and CI 3110
CI 4490
CI 4130, 4170 and 4190
CI 4680
CI 4910 and 4930

Integrated Science Option
Core Science: Complete all six areas

Life Science Course: 14 hours

EEES 2150, 2160, 3050
BIOL 2170 and 2180

Chemistry Core: 14 hours
CHEM 1230, 1240, 1280, 1290, 2410

Physics Core: 12 hours
PHYS 1910, 2070, 2080 and 2100

Earth and Space Science Core: 11 hours
ASTR 2010
EEES 2100 and 1020
GEPL 4540

Science and Mathematics Core: 17 hours
PHYS/BIOL 1340
EEES 2010
MATH 1830, 1840 and 2600

Advanced Science: Select one area of four
Advanced Life Science: 12 hours

BIOL 3010, 3030 and 3040 or 3020
EEES 3060, 4150

Advanced Chemistry: 13 hours
CHEM 2420, 2460, 2470, 3710, 3860

EEES 4220

Advanced Physics: 11 hours
PHYS 3180, 3310, 3320and 3610

Advanced Earth and Space Science: 16 hours
ASTR 2020, 2050 and 2340
EEES 2400, 3100 and 4000

Life Science Option
Core and Advanced Life Science: 25 hours

BIOL/ EEES 2150 and 2160
BIOL 2170 and 2180
BIOL 3010, 3030 and 3040 or 3020

EEES 3050 and 3060
EEES 4150

Science and Mathematics Core: 16 hours
PHYS/BIOL 1340
EEES 2010
MATH 1750, 1760 and 2600

Supporting Life Science: 19 hours
CHEM 1230, 1240 and 1280
EEES 2100
GEPL 4540
PHYS 1320

Second Core Area: Select one area of three
Chemistry (recommended): 4 hours

CHEM 1230, 1240, 1280, 1290, and 2410

Physics: 13 hours (MATH 1830/1840 required)
PHYS 1910, 2070 and 2080

Earth and Space Science: 4 hours
ASTR 2010
EEES 2100 and 1020
GEPL 4540

Earth and Space Science Option
Core and Advanced Earth Space Science: 27 hours

ASTR 2010
EEES 2100 and 1020
GEPL 4540
ASTR 2020, 2050 and 2340
EEES 2400, 3100 and 4000

Science and Mathematics Core: 16 hours
PHYS/BIOL 1340
EEES 2010
MATH 1750, 1760 and 2600

Supporting Earth and Space Science: 12 hours
EEES 2150

CHEM 1230 and 1280

PHYS 1320

Second Core Area: Select one area of three
Chemistry (recommended): 8 hours

CHEM 1230, 1240, 1280, 1290 and 2410

Physics: 13 hours (MATH 1830/1840 required)
PHYS 1910, 2070 and2080

Life Science: 9 hours
EEES 2150, 2160 and 3050
BIOL 2170 and 2180

Chemistry Option
Core and Advanced Chemistry: 26 hours

CHEM 1230, 1240, 1280, 1290, 2140 and 2460
CHEM 2420, 2470, 3710 and 3860
EEES 4220

Science and Mathematics Core: 17 hours
PHYS/BIOL 1340
EEES 2010
MATH 1830, 1840 and 2600

Supporting Chemistry: 18 hours
BIOL 2170
EEES 2100
PHYS 2070 and 2080

Second Core Area: Select one area of three
Physics: 3 hours (MATH 1830/1840 required)

Recommended

PHYS 1910, 2070 and 2080

Earth and Space Science: 7 hours
EEES 2100 and 1020
ASTR 2010
GEPL 4540

Life Science: 9 hours
BIOL 2170 and 2180
BIOL/ EEES 2150, 2160
EEES 3050

Physics Option
Core and Advanced Physics: 24-26 hours

PHYS 1910, 2070, 2080 and 2100
PHYS 3180, 3310, 3320 and 3610

Science and Mathematics Core: 17 hours
PHYS/BIOL 1340
EEES 2010
MATH 1830, 1840 and 2600

Supporting Physics: 14 hours

ASTR 2010
BIOL 2170
CHEM 1230
GEPL 4540

Second Core Area: Select one area of three
Earth and Space Science: 5 hours
Recommended

ASTR 2010
EEES 2100 and 1020
GEPL 4540

Chemistry: 9 hours
CHEM 1230, 1240, 1280, 1290 and2410

Life Science: 9 hours
BIOL/ EEES 2150, 2160
BIOL 2170 and 2180
EEES 3050

Integrated Language Arts
Pre-professional Education: 12 hours

EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
SPED 2040
TSOC 3000

Professional Education: 44 hours
CI 3240:003 or: 004 and CI 3110
CI 4130
CI 4150 and 4190
CI 4320
CI 4440
CI 4490
EDP 3250/ 3200
CI 4910 and 4930
3000-4000 level Education elective

Language Arts Content 40-44 hours
ENGL 2010, 3600, 3610, 3150, 3770, 3790, 3810 and 4090
Choose one of the following: ENGL 3010, 3050, 3800, 4030, 4070 or 4080
Choose one of the following: COMM 2100, 2150, 2600 or 3610
COMM 3830 and 4110
ENGL elective(s) at 4000 level

Integrated Social Studies
Professional Education: 38 hours

CI 3420:003 or: 004 and CI 3110
CI 4130
CI 4180 and 4190
CI 4490
CI 4720
CI 4910 and 4930
EDP 3250/ 3200

Social Studies Content: 60 hours
U.S. History: Select three:

HIST 3250, 3260, 3280, 3290, 3310, 3360 /70, 3400, 3410, 3480, 3600, 3770/ 80, 4200, 4230, 4250, or 4280

European History: Select three:
HIST 3100, 3500, 3510, 3530, 4040, 4080, 4090, 4100, 4150, 4170, 4620, 4680or 4760

Non-Western History: Select three:
HIST 3210, 3550, 3630, 3640, 4470, 4720 or 4740

Related Social Sciences Content
ANTH 2800
ECON 1150 and 1200
GEPL 2010 and 4040
PSC 1200
PSC 2300 and 2700
PSY 1010
REL 1220
SOC 4580 or SOC 3000-4000 Level

Multiage Education
Multiage Visual Arts Education
Programs in art education and music education are housed in the College of Arts and Sciences. The art program prepares students for teaching art at all levels (ages 3-21/grades PreK-12)

University Core and General Education: 27-33 hours
Pre-professional Education: 18 hours

EDU 1700
SPED 2040
AED 3100 or 4150
ETPT 2020
EDP 3200

EDP 3230

Professional Education: 32 hours
AED 3500 and 4450
AED 4200 or 4950
AED 4900 and 4930
CI 4490
TSOC 3000
AED 4140

Art Foundations Core: 13 hours
ARS 1000
ART 1080, 2050, 2060 and 2080

Studio Art: 18 hours
ART 2150 and 2230

ART 2330 or 3380 or 4990
ART 2430 and 2530
ART 2810 or 3150

Art History Core: 12 hours

ARTH 2001 or 2980:002
ARTH 2003 or 2980:003
ARTH 2080 or 3400 or 2980 or 4980 (Modern Art)

Choose one non-Western course from below:
ARTH 2100, 2200, 3250, 3270, 3300 or 3350

Area of Concentration: 12-16 hours
Choose one of the following concentrations:
Art History
Arts
Studio
New Media

New Media Concentration: 12 hours
ART 2160, 3150
Choose two electives from the following:
ART 3160, 3170, 4320 or 4340

Multiage Music Education
The music education degree prepares students for Ohio Teacher Licensure in music in grades PreK-12. Students interested in this program must pass an entrance audition on their major instrument. Please call the department of music office at 419.530.2448 for audition information visit http://music.utoledo.edu/musicAtUTPR/index.asp?id=71.

University Core and General Education: 30 hours minimum
(Including MUS 2220 or 2250)

Pre-professional Education: 12 hours
ARS 1000:009
EDP 3200
MED 3000
SPED 2040
TSOC 3000

Professional Education: 28 hours
CI 4490
EDP 3230
MED 3300, 3310 and 3320
MED 4900 and MED 4930

Content Area: 47 hours
MUS 1000, 1010, 1100, 1570, 1580, 1610, 1620, 1800, 2410, 2610, 2620, 2800, 3410, 3420, 3500, 3800, 3810

Please note all majors must:
a) Perform a senior recital (MUS 3810) prior to student teaching
b) Attend 16 non-departmental concerts/recitals and 64 departmental concerts/recitals and complete one credit of registration in a chamber ensemble MUS 3050
c) Perform during MUS 1000, six times (minimum three as soloist) prior to senior recital hearing

Cluster
Choose one cluster from choral or instrumental.

Instrumental Elective Cluster: 26 hours

MUS 1500, 1510, 1530, 1550, 2570, 3050, 3520, 3530 and 3630

Ensembles: Select from the ensembles below. The minimum requirement is an accumulation of seven hours of ensemble credits, but only four hours count toward the hours required credit hours for the degree.
MUS 3010
MUS 3090
Students electing the instrumental cluster must enroll in two semesters of marching band; string concentration substitutes a marching band field experience.

Choral/General Elective Cluster: 22 hours
MUS 1530, 2530, 2540, 2570, 2580, 3050, 3510 and 3550

Ensembles: Select from the ensembles below. The minimum requirement is an accumulation of seven hours of ensemble credits, but only four hours count toward the hours required credit hours for the degree.
MUS 3140, 3160 or 3180

*If the instrument concentration is keyboard, substitute two to three semesters of large instrumental or vocal ensemble and one semester each of MUS 2590 Piano Class for Piano Majors and MUS 3580 Functional Piano Techniques for Piano Class I-III/IV. Students also must complete two semesters of MUS 3050 Accompanying, as part of the large ensemble requirement. Students whose instrument concentration is guitar must complete four credits of large vocal ensemble (choral/general elective cluster) or four credits of large instrumental ensemble (instrumental elective cluster).

**Students must enroll in MUS 1000:002 Lab Ensemble when taking the following courses: MED 3300, 3310, 3320, MUS 1500, 1530, 1550, 1560, 2500, 3500, 3510 and 3520. Lab Ensemble must be taken for a total of five semesters.

Multiage Physical Education
Students who complete a physical education major will be licensed to teach physical education PreK-12.

Physical Education: PreK-12
University Core and General Education: 33 hours

Pre-professional Education: 26 hours

EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
EDP 3200 and 3230
PED 2100, 2200, 2960, and 2950
TSOC 3000

Professional Education: 19 hours (Professional Standing Required)
CI 4490
PED 3000, 3120, 3130, 3740, 3950 and 4100

Physical Education Methods: 9 hours (Professional Standing Required)
PED 3100(corequisite PED 3000)
PED 3140 (corequisite PED 3130)
PED 3400

Student Teaching: 15 hours (Professional Standing Required)
PED 4920 and 4930

Physical Education Content Area: 25 hours
HEAL 1500 and 2500
KINE 2560/2460, 2570/2470, 2960, 3520, 3530, 4540 and 4550

Electives: 7-13 hours minimum
See faculty adviser for electives.

Important reminders:

 You are responsible for meeting prerequisites for all course work as specified in this catalog.
 Acceptance into professional education requires a minimum GPA of 2.7 overall and in professional education and major area o
f course work. All transfer work is included in the GPA calculation.
 You are responsible for fulfilling the minimum 128
-hour requirement to graduate.
 The state of Ohio requires successful completion of Praxis II to be eligible for licensure upon graduation. This test shoul
d be taken prior to student teaching to allow time for processing.

Physical Education and School Health: PreK-12
University Core and General Education: 33 hours

Pre-professional Education: 31 hours

EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
EDP 3200 and 3230
HEAL 2000 and 2900
PED 2100, 2200, 2960, and 2950
TSOC 3000

Professional Education: 25 hours (Professional Standing Required)
CI 4490
HEAL 4100 and 4600
PED 3000 (co-requisite PED 3100)
PED 3120
PED 3130 (co-requisite PED 3140)
PED 3740, 3950 and 4100

Health and Physical Education Methods: 15 hours (Professional Standing Required)
HEAL 4300 and 4350
PED 3100 (co-requisite PED 3000)
PED 3140 (co-requisite PED 3130)
PED 3400

Student Teaching: 16 hours (Professional Standing Required)
HEAL 4920 and 4930
PED 4920 and 4930

Physical Education Content Area: 12 hours
KINE 2960, 3520,3530,4540,4550 (see advisor)

School Health Content: 21 hours
HEAL 2600, 2700, 3300, 3600, 3700, 4400 and 4700

Health and Physical Education Content: 13 hours
HEAL 1500 and 2500
KINE 2560/2460 and 2570/2470

Multiage Health Education
Students who complete the health education major are licensed to teach health education PreK-12. Students may complete a second degree (e.g., B.A. in urban studies, B.Ed. in community health) or a second track (e.g., athletic training or physical education) for the B.Ed. degree. A single degree program leading to licensure in health education also is an option. Students interested in these programs should contact the departmental chair or the undergraduate dean in the College of Health and Human Services.

Health Education PreK-12
Single Degree: B.Ed.

Note: Students interested in combinations with other majors or a dual-degree option should see the department of health professions chair in the College of Health and Human Services.

University Core and General Education: 33 hours
Pre-professional Education: 23 hours

EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
EDP 3200 and 3230
HEAL 2000 and 2900
TSOC 3000
SPED 2040

Professional Education: 15 hours
CI 4490
HEAL 4300, 4350, 4600 and 4100

Student Teaching: 14 hours
HEAL 4920 and 4930

School Health: 34 hours

HEAL 1500, 2500, 2600, 2700, 3300, 3600, 3700, 4400 and 4700
KINE 2560/2460 and 2570/2470

Electives: 13-19 hours

Multiage Foreign Languages Education
Multiage programs prepare students for teaching French, German or Spanish at all levels, ages 3-21/grades PreK-12.

University Core and General Education: 33 hours

FRENCH
Pre-professional Education: 18 hours

EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
EDP 3200 and 3230
SPED 2040
TSOC 3000

WAC: 6 hours (Select two courses)

Courses vary from year to year and are listed on the registrar’s office Web site. Courses also can be selected in consultation with the arts and sciences adviser. Two courses must be from your content area.

Professional Education: 33 hours
CI 4130

The following two courses are taken concurrently:
CI 4140 and 4190
FREN 4160
CI 4490

The following three courses are taken concurrently:
CI 4430, 4910 and 4930

Content Area: 25 hours
FREN 3010*, 3020, 3210, 3220, 3410, 3420, 4010 and 4020

*First course taken in this sequence is dependent on placement test scores, AP credit or CLEP.

Electives: 9 hours

FREN 3170, 3400, 3710, 4040, 4050, 4070, 4190, 4200, 4230, 4310, 4410, 4510, 4610, 4710, 4720, 4810, 4820, 4850, 4860, 4910, 4950, or 4980

Others at discretion of the French faculty of the department of foreign languages.

Additional Electives: 10-12 hours

Elective hours to meet 131-hour graduation requirement.

Additional Requirements for Dual Degree Option** - B.A. in French: 20 hours
**Humanities/fine arts

**Natural science
**Social science
**Arts and sciences electives

**In consultation with College of Arts and Sciences faculty adviser and your degree audit from the College of Arts and Sciences. You must obtain the signature of the faculty adviser for these courses.

GERMAN
Pre-professional Education: 18 hours

EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
EDP 3200 and 3230
SPED 2040
TSOC 3000

WAC: 6 hours (Select two courses)

Courses vary from year-to-year and are listed on the registrar’s office Web site. Courses also can be selected in consultation with the arts and sciences adviser. Two courses must be from your content area.

Professional Education: 33 hours
CI 4130

The following two courses are taken concurrently:
CI 4140 and 4190
GERM 4160
CI 4490

The following three courses are taken concurrently:
CI 4430, 4910 and 4930

Content Area: 22 hours
GERM 3010*, 3020, 3200, 3410, 3420, 4010 and 4020

*First course taken in this sequence is dependent on placement test scores, AP credit or CLEP.

Electives: 12 hours

GERM 3170, 3180, 4190, 4200, 4500, 4510, 4610, 4620, 4710, 4720, 4810, 4850, 4870, 4900, 4910, 4980, or 4990

Others at discretion of the German faculty of the department of foreign languages.

Additional Electives

Elective hours to meet 131-hour graduation requirement.

Additional Requirements for Dual Degree Option** - B.A. in German: 20 hours
**Humanities/fine arts
**Natural science

**Social science
**Arts and sciences electives

**In consultation with College of Arts and Sciences faculty adviser and your degree audit from the College of Arts and Sciences. You must obtain the signature of the faculty adviser for these courses.

SPANISH
Pre-professional Education: 18 hours

EDU 1700
ETPT 2020
EDP 3200 and 3230
SPED 2040
TSOC 3000

WAC: 6 hours (Select two courses)

Courses vary from year-to-year and are listed on the registrar’s office Web site. Courses also can be selected in consultation with the arts and sciences adviser. Two courses must be from your content area.

Professional Education: 33 hours
CI 4130
CI 4140 and 4190
SPAN 4120
CI 4490
CI 4430, 4910 and 4930

Content Area: 22 hours
SPAN 3000, 3010* and 3020
SPAN 4010

*First course taken in this sequence is dependent on placement test scores, AP credit or CLEP.

Literature I (choose one from group below)
SPAN 3210 or 3270

Literature II (choose one from group below)
SPAN 3220 or 3280

Civilization (choose one from group below)
SPAN 3410 or 3420

Electives: 12 hours

Select 12 hours from the list below
SPAN 3170, 4000, 4060, 4070, 4110, 4150, 4160, 4170, 4190, 4240, 4250, 4260, 4270, 4310, 4370, 4410, 4430, 4710, 4720, 4810, 4820, 4830, 4980, or 4910

Others at the discretion of the Spanish faculty of the department of foreign languages.

Additional Electives

Elective hours to meet 131-hour graduation requirement

Additional Requirements for Dual Degree Option** - B.A. in Spanish: 20 hours
**Humanities/fine arts
**Natural science
**Social science
**Arts and sciences electives
**In consultation with College of Arts and Sciences faculty adviser and your degree audit from the College of Arts and Sciences. You
must obtain the signature of the faculty adviser for these courses.

Career and Technical Education
Courses in career and technical education may be arranged to complete Ohio’s licensure requirements for teaching in a vocational school or for teaching in a technical college, business and industry. Each prospective vocational teacher will combine occupational experience with academic course work to complete the degree requirements. Recent work experience has been the foundation of vocational education that assures recipients state-of-the-art technical instruction.

Non-Degree (Licensure Only)
Any person who has five years of recent work experience in any occupation (or a combination of work experience and college credit) may be eligible for the initial two-year teaching licensure in that occupation. Teaching eligibility will be determined by submitting the completed Qualification Evaluation Form for Vocational Teacher (VE 36) to the employing school and completing examinations prescribed by the Judith Herb College of Education and vocational program to verify basic skills and technical competence in the teaching field.

Individuals recruited from business and industry with less than a bachelor’s degree in vocational education may receive a Five-Year Vocational Licensure after having completed the following requirements:
1. Performance – evidence of satisfactory performance as an instructor and the recommendation of the Judith Herb College of Education.
2. Experience – two years of supervised teaching experience on provisional vocational licensure.
3. Professional preparation – completion of a minimum of 24 semester hours of teacher improvement work.
4. Completion of an entry-year program.

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Judith Herb College of Education Faculty

Amy Allen, 2003, lecturer
B.E., M.Ed., Ph. D. The University of Toledo

Svetlana Beltyukova, 2005, assistant professor
Ph.D. Kiev Linguistic University; M.E., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Edward Cancio, 2007, assistant professor
B.S., M.S.E., University of Wisconsin, Ph.D. Utah State University

Eileen M. Carr, 1987, professor
B.A., Newton College of the Sacred Heart; M.Ed., M.A.Ed., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Leigh Chiarelott, 2007, professor
B.A., M.S., Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Laurence J. Coleman, 2001, professor
B.A., State University of New York at Albany; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College; Ph.D., Kent State University

Charlene M. Czerniak, 1989, professor
B.A., The University of Toledo; M.Ed., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Ron Davis, 2008 lecturer
B.A., University of Ashland, M.A., University of Akron

Dwayne L. DeMedio, 1975, professor
B.S.Ed., California State College - Pennsylvania; M.A., Ed.D., West Virginia University

Jenny Mescall Denyer, 2003, assistant professor
B.S., Xavier University; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University

Patricia Devlin, 2002, associate professor
B.S.Ed., California State University; M.A., Ed.D., Eastern Michigan University

Laurie A. Dinnebeil, 1993, professor
B.A., Dominican College of Blauvelt; M.A.T., Augustana College; Ph.D., Utah State University

Jim Dyko, 2005, lecturer
B.A., M.Ed., The University of Toledo

Mary Ellen Edwards, 1994, professor
B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research

Christine M. Fox, 1994, associate professor
B.A., Miami University; M.A., Cleveland State University; Ph.D., Kent State University

William M. Gray, 1975, professor
B.A., M.A., Ed.D., State University of New York - Albany

Penny Poplin Gosetti, 1994, associate professor
B.A., University of California - Los Angeles; M.S., California State University - Long Beach; Ph.D., University of Oregon

Lynne Hamer, 2002, associate professor
B.A., Hamline University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University

Susanna Hapgood, 2006 assistant professor
B.A., University of New Hampshire; M.A., Ph.D. University of Michigan

Noela Haughton, 2007, assistant professor
B.S., The University of the West Indies; M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

Paul E. Hubaker, 2002, lecturer
B.E., M.E., Ed.S., The University of Toledo

Debra Johanning, assistant professor
A.S., Kishwaulkee Community College; B.S., M.S., Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., Michigan State University

Joan Kaderavek, 2009 Distinguished University Professor
B.A., Miami University; M.A., The Ohio State University; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Marcella Kehus, 2005 assistant professor
B.A., MACT, Michigan State University; Ph.D., Oakland University

Virginia L. Keil, 2001, associate professor and associate dean for undergraduate studies and accreditation
B.S. Ed., Bowling Green State University; M.Ed., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Lisa A. Kovach, 2002, assistant professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Martha Kransdorf, 2005, lecturer
A.B., Hunter College; M.Ed., Wayne State University; Ph.D., University of Michigan

Revathy Kumar, 2001, associate professor
B.Sc., University of Bombay; B.Ed., M.Ed., Bangalore University; M.A., Annamalia University; Ph.D., University of Michigan

Judy Lambert, 2004, assistant professor
B.S., Fayetteville State University; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Sakui W. Malakpa, 1986, professor
B.S., Florida State University; Ed.M., Ed.D., Harvard University

Reneé J. Martin, 1986, professor
B.S., M.S., University of Wisconsin - LaCrosse; Ph.D., Iowa State University

William F. McInerney, 1983, professor
B.A., Villanova University; M.Ed., University of Hartford; Ph.D., Kent State University

David L. Meabon, 1994, associate professor
B.S., West Virginia State College; M.Ed., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., Florida State University

Ronald Opp, 1997, associate professor
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., California State University - Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of California - Los Angeles

Sekhar Pindiprolu, 2005, associate professor
B.S., Nagarjuna University; B.M.R., Osmania University; M.Ed. Kurukshetra University; M. Phil., Jarnia Millia University; Ph.D., Utah State University

Celia Regimbal, 1986, associate professor
B.S.P.E., M.S.P.E., University of Florida; Ed.D., University of North Carolina

Charles Rop, 1996, associate professor
A.B., Calvin College; Ph.D., Michigan State University

Tony R. Sanchez, 2003, associate professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Indiana University

Rebecca Schneider, 2001, associate professor
B.E., M.Ed., The University of Toledo; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan

Robert Schultz, 2001, associate professor
B.A., B.S., M.A., The University of Akron; M.A., Ph.D., Kent State University

Snejana Slantcheve-Durst, 2007 assistant professor
M.A., Sofia University; MBA, American University in Bulgaria; Ph.D. University of Massachusetts Amherst

Ruslan Slutsky, 2001, associate professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Dale T. Snauwaert, 2003, associate professor
B.A., University of Illinois at Chicago, Ed.M., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign

Gregory E. Stone, 2002, assistant professor
B.A., Shimer College; M.A., Loyola University of Chicago; Ph.D., The University of Chicago

Robert F. Sullivan, 1983, professor
B.A., M.S., Canisius College; Ph.D., State University of New York - Buffalo

Thomas J. Switzer, 2002, professor and dean
B.A., University of Northern Iowa; Ph.D., University of Michigan

Berhane Teclehaimanot, 2001, associate professor
B.A., St. Louis University; M.Ed., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Mark Templin, 2001, associate professor
B.E., M.A., The University of Toledo; Ph.D., University of Michigan

William B. Weber Jr., 1994, associate professor
B.S., M.A., The University of Toledo; Ed.D., University of Michigan

Richard Welsch, 2001, associate professor
B.S., Youngstown State University; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

EMERITUS FACULTY

John F. Ahern, 1969, professor emeritus
B.B.A., Boston College; M.A.T., Ed.D., University of Massachusetts

David M. Balzer, 1968, professor emeritus
B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Langston C. Bannister, 1971, professor emeritus
B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., San Francisco State University; Ed.D., University of Massachusetts

Reemt R. Baumann, 1966, professor emeritus
B.A., Valparaiso University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison

Martha E. Carroll, 1974, professor emerita
A.B., M.Ed., University of North Carolina; Ed.D., George Peabody College for Teachers

Gary E. Cooke, 1971, professor emeritus
B.S.Ed., Concordia Teachers College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Oregon

John R. Cryan, 1978, professor emeritus
B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University

Dewitt C. Davison, 1967, professor emeritus
B.S., Alabama State University; M.Ed., Tuskegee Institute; Ph.D., University of Illinois

Jerome E. DeBruin, 1972, professor emeritus
B.S., University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point; M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Illinois

Kenneth C. DeGood, 1958, professor emeritus
A.B., Findlay College; M.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Thomas G. Dunn, 1971, professor emeritus
B.S., Fordham University; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University

Lester J. Elsie, 1971, professor emeritus
B.S., State University College - Buffalo; M.Ed., Ed.D., State University of New York - Buffalo

Thomas C. Gibney, 1964, professor emeritus
B.A., M.A., University of Northern Iowa; Ph.D., State University of Iowa

Lois Hodgson-Barbour, 1967, professor emerita
B.A., Park College; M.A., San Francisco State University; Ph.D., University of Iowa

Lynne M. Hudson, 1976, professor emerita
B.A., Kalamazoo College; M.Ed., Ph.D., Wayne State University

Joseph B. Hurst, 1972, professor emeritus
B.S., M.Ed., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Florida State University; Ed.S., The University of Toledo

Stephen G. Jurs, 1970, professor emeritus
B.S., M.S.Ed., Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., University of Colorado

Mark B. Kinney, 1976, professor emeritus
B.A., University of Maine - Orono; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers

Thomas R. Lopez, Jr., 1970, professor emeritus
B.S., Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Suzanne L. McFarland, 1976, professor emerita
B.S., Millersville State College; M.Ed., Temple University; Ed.D., Indiana University

Dean L. Meinke, 1968, professor emeritus
B.A., M.Ed., University of Wisconsin - Superior; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison

Daniel L. Merritt, 1972, professor emeritus
B.S., State University of New York - Oswego; M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University; J.D., The University of Toledo

Roy A. Miller, 1969, professor emeritus
B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Kent State University

Hughes Moir, 1969, professor emeritus
A.B., Antioch College; M.Ed., Boston University; Ed.D., Wayne State University

Paul H. Muntz, 1958, professor emeritus
A.B., Capital University; M.Ed., The University of Toledo

Linda Murphy, 1973, professor emerita
B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Earl Murry, 1987, professor emeritus
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Anthula Natsoulas, 1983, professor emerita
B.S., M.A., City College of New York; Ph.D., Syracuse University

Janet M. Northrup, 1969, professor emerita
B.Ed., M.Ed., The University of Toledo

Edward J. Nussel, 1964, professor emeritus
B.S.Ed., University of Detroit; M.Ed., Ed.D., Wayne State University

Merritt H. Obreiter, 1978, professor emeritus
B.S., Montclair State College; M.A., Ball State University; Ed.D., Rutgers University

Amos C. Patterson, 1974, professor emeritus
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Indiana University

Richard R. Perry, 1949, professor emeritus
B.Ed., M.A., Ed.D., The University of Toledo

James W. Piper, 1977, professor emeritus
B.Voc.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.S., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Carol E. Plimpton, 1985, professor emerita
B.S., Russell Sage College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Newton C. Rochte, 1952, professor emeritus
B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

David S. Rosenberger, 1960, professor emeritus
B.A., Bluffton College; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Philip J. Rusche, 1983, professor emeritus
A.B., B.S., M.A., University of Cincinnati; Ed.D., University of Rochester

Richard W. Saxe, 1966, Distinguished University Professor Emeritus
B.S., George Williams College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago

George B. Shirk, 1972, professor emeritus
B.A., Augustana College; M.A.T., University of the South; Ph.D., University of Illinois

Sam R. Snyder, 1969, professor emeritus
B.A., Kent State University; M.Ed., The University of Toledo; Ph.D., University of Michigan

Joseph C. Sommerville, 1970, professor emeritus
B.S., Morehouse College; M.S., M.A., Ed.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan

John A. Spiess, 1967, professor emeritus
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa

David Tavel, 1961, professor emeritus
B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Clark University; Ed.D., Boston University

Robert T. Utz, 1968, professor emeritus
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Washington University

Richard E. White, 1967, professor emeritus
B.B.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

William Wiersma, 1963, professor emeritus
B.S., University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison

Darryl B. Yorke, 1972, professor emeritus
A.B., Colorado State College; M.A., Western State College; Ed.D., Brigham Young University

John W. Zimmer, 1980, professor emeritus
B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Mankato State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Last Updated: 3/22/15