The University of Toledo’s Path to Excellence

   Not yet started    In progress – needs attention    In progress – on target    Achieved

I. Student Success and Academic Excellence

GOAL 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Overall undergraduate first-year retention rateSpecifically calculated rates based on U.S. Department of Education formulas. 74% 80% Provost, All Colleges, SA, ODI, OMSS, CISP, SDS
Overall undergraduate six-year graduation rateSpecifically calculated rates based on U.S. Department of Education formulas. 43% 50% Provost, All Colleges, SA, ODI, OMSS, CISP, SDS
Percent gap for first-year retention rate between minority studentsUnderrepresented minorities as specified by the U.S. government include black or African-American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian or Alaskan Native, or Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. and majority students 5% 0% Provost, All Colleges, SA, ODI, OMSS, CISP, SDS
Percent gap for six-year graduation rate between minority students and majority students 7% 0% Provost, All Colleges, SA, ODI, OMSS, CISP, SDS
Student support as measured by the National Survey of Student EngagementNational survey that captures information from undergraduate students about their attitudes and experiences in college. score "support for overall well-being" UT freshman rate: 2.8 out of 4.0 Exceed the Carnegie Classification mean of 3.0 out of 4.0 Provost, All Colleges, SA, ODI, OMSS, CISP, SDS
Reduction in number of undergraduate degree programs that are more than 120 credit hours 4 programs at 120 credits 50% of programs at 120 credits Provost, All Colleges
GOAL 2: Improve graduate and professional student success through timely degree completion.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Two-year graduation rate of full-time master's degree students 80% 82% Provost, COGS, All Colleges
Graduate and professional students' entrance exam scoresMany graduate and professional programs rely on standardized, national examinations to help admissions offices assess applicants. LSAT: 150.7
MCAT: 508
LSAT: 154
MCAT: 516
Provost, COGS, All Colleges
Licensure and board pass rates Weighted average rate: 87% Weighted average rate: 94% Provost, COGS, All Colleges
Percent of graduating medical residents who enter practice in northwest Ohio 40% 60% COMLS
Number of new residencies or fellowships available at ProMedica Toledo Hospital and ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital 15 residency and 12 fellowship programs Increase by 8 in total COMLS
GOAL 3: Prepare students for advanced academic studies and career success.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Program-level student learning outcomes, assessments and achievements aligned to UT's Institutional Student Learning Outcomes as documented in an annual review process 0% 100% Provost, All Colleges, IR
Percentage of distance-learning courses that are Quality Matters-certified or meet Quality Matters standards 6% certified + 6% meeting standards 33% certified. All new and revised online courses meet QM standards. Provost, All Colleges, DL
Number of undergraduate-to-graduate pipeline programs 6 10 Provost, All Colleges, COGS
Undergraduate participation rates in experiential learning 65% 80% Provost, All Colleges, CELCS
Undergraduate student placement rate 76% 85% Provost, All Colleges, CELCS

II. Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities

Goal 1: Achieve national recognition for research excellence.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Implement plan for two areas of excellence: biomedical and environmental sustainability research (spring 2018: implementation and investment plan, developed by the faculty, will be in place. 2022: implementation and investment plan will be 100% completed for its 5-year goal.) 0% completed 100% completed R&SP, Provost, President, appropriate deans and All Colleges
Additional areas of excellence to be identified, in collaboration with faculty, with plans for implementation (spring 2018: additional areas of excellence developed by the faculty will be identified with master plans for implementation. 2022: implementation and investment plan will be 100% completed for its 5-year goal.) 0% completed 100% completed R&SP, Provost, President, appropriate deans and All Colleges
Goal 2: Increase the national prominence of faculty derived from their research, scholarship, and creative and performing arts activities.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
UT's national ranking in research expenditures 190 160 R&SP, GR, COGS
UT's ranking in research and development expenditures among Ohio public research universities 6th 3rd R&SP, GR, COGS
Number of faculty publications in high-impact and high-profile journals, with program faculty identifying those journals relating to their disciplines Baseline will be determined when faculty activity reporting software becomes operational in AY 2017-18 Goal to be determined after establishment of baseline Provost, All Colleges, R&SP, IR
Number of faculty who are fellows of selected national societies, hold leadership positions in national organizations, or serve on national grant-review panels or study groups Baseline will be determined when faculty activity reporting software becomes operational in AY 2017-18 Goal to be determined after establishment of baseline Provost, All Colleges, R&SP, IR
Number of faculty and staff participating in local research and community engagement activities Baseline will be determined when faculty activity reporting software becomes operational in AY 2017-2018 Goal to be determined after establishment of baseline Provost, All Colleges, R&SP, SA, CE
Goal 3: Reinvent and reinvest in research processes to improve productivity.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Carnegie Classification for UT's research activity and graduate programs R2 Doctoral Research University and Research Doctoral: Comprehensive Programs with Medical/Veterinary School R2 Doctoral Research University and Research Doctoral: Comprehensive Programs with Medical/Veterinary School President, Provost, R&SP, GR, COGS, IR
Investment in research support infrastructure Baseline will be determined after completion of assessment in summer 2017 Investment in research support infrastructure will be at the level of aspirational peers R&SP, Comp, IT, F&A

III. Faculty, Staff and Alumni

Goal 1: Foster a culture of excellence by supporting retention, career progression and high job satisfaction for staff.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
RetentionThe rate of staff who remain calculated against the numbers who depart. rate of non-faculty staff 79.25% 83% HR&TD
Goal 2: Foster a culture of excellence by supporting retention, promotion and high job satisfaction for faculty.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Percent of full professors in the pool of full-time faculty 25.4% 33% Provost, All Colleges
Rate of tenure-track assistant professors achieving tenure and promotion in seven years 78.6% 82% Provost, All Colleges
Average time spent as associate professor before progressing to full professor rank. 7.1 years 6.8 years Provost, All Colleges
Goal 3: Increase diversity among all employees.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Academic and administrative units having approved diversity hiring plans 0% 100% HR&TD, ODI
Percentage of employees participating in annual diversity training 0% 100% HR&TD, ODI
Goal 4: Strengthen employee work-life balance, sense of community and pride in work.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Overall work satisfaction average from a nationally normed campus assessment instrument Baseline will be determined when survey is initiated in 2018 Goal to be determined after establishment of baseline President, Provost, HR&TD
Goal 5: Engage alumni, friends and stakeholders meaningfully in the life of the University.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Number of alumni and friends involved annually in academic programs and co-curricular activities Baseline will be determined when database of alumni, friends' and stakeholders' involvement in UT becomes operational in AY 2017-18 Goal to be determined after establishment of baseline Provost, All Colleges, Alum

IV. Fiscal Positioning and Infrastructure

Goal 1: Build a strong financial foundation.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Capital funding increase in the annual operating budget 0% 2% annually F&A
Net income margin and investment capital of UTMC 0% 5% of net patient revenue UTMC, F&A
Colleges meeting their agreed-upon contribution goals 0% 100% Provost, All Colleges, DEM, F&A
Key leverage ratios, as measured by annual Moody's ratiosMeasurements of financial aspects of a university. Aa in both key leverage ratios A in both key leverage ratios F&A
Goal 2: Ensure adaptability, sustainability and fiscal health for academic programs.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Number of programs meeting their instructional efficiency goals (student-to-faculty ratios, cost per credit hour, number of organized class sections per faculty FTE) based on national peer data Baseline will be established in AY 2017-18 80% of programs meet their established goals Provost, All Colleges, F&A, IR
Goal 3: Increase revenue and operating efficiencies.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Total UT enrollment 20,648 22,000 Provost, All Colleges, DEM, F&A
Annual net revenue increase $753.7 million 2% annually F&A
Percentage share of the State Share of Instruction (SSI) funding pool 7.3% Range within 0.5% of market share Provost, All Colleges, DEM, F&A
Revenue from commercialization of research and technology transfer FY 2011-14: invention disclosure: 10.0; licenses: 2.2; license income: $128,629; reimbursement rate: 56%; startups formed: 0.40 UT Technology Transfer will continue to be one of the top performers in Ohio in the areas of invention disclosure, licenses, license income, reimbursement rate and startups formed per $10 million in research expenditures annually F&A, R&SP, All Colleges
Revenue generated or cost reduction/avoidance from technology services and products $1 million 20% growth annually IT, F&A
Cost savings from operating efficiencies Baseline will be determined after completion of assessment in AY 2017-2018 Goal to be determined after establishment of baseline F&A
Goal 4: Improve UT’s infrastructure.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Completion of projects and initiatives proposed for the first five years of the Multiple-campus Master Plan 0% 100% F&C
State funds invested annually into deferred maintenance projects $4.125 million 30% from state funds annually F&A, F&C, GR
Completion of a UT technology strategic plan 0% 100% IT

V. Reputation and Engagement

Goal 1: Improve and strengthen our national and international reputation, and improve ties at the local and regional levels.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
UT's ranking in U.S. News & World Report among public, national universities 133 100 President, Provost, All Colleges, R&SP, MarCom, GR
Number of nationally ranked academic programs and departments 5 10 President, Provost, All Colleges, R&SP, MarCom
Individual program ranking in U.S. News & World Report Medicine 88, Law 144, Doctor of Pharmacy 60, Doctor of Occupational Therapy 37, Graduate Education online 109 Goals to be set by individual colleges President, Provost, All Colleges, R&SP, MarCom
Average ACT score of incoming cohort of full-time undergraduate students 22.8 23.5 Provost, DEM, UA
UT's designation as a Carnegie Community Engaged Institution Designation in place Maintain designation through renewal process President, Provost, All Colleges, CE, GR
Percentage of students who feel safe on UT campuses as measured by the Campus Climate SurveyDeveloped by UT and first used in 2010. 83% Increase by 2% annually Provost, All Colleges, SA, Counsel, CP
Goal 2: Design a unified branding and marketing process for national and international visibility and reputation-building.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Completion of UT branding process and development of consistent messaging 0% 100% VPA, MarCom
Total favorable mentions in highly valued, national media outlets Baseline to be created in 2017 Increase by 5% annually Provost, All Colleges, MarCom
Exposure on national television for UT academic programs and research, and UT Athletics events Baseline to be created in 2017 Increase by 5% annually Provost, All Colleges, Ath, MarCom
Goal 3: Grow the UT health-care system to better serve northwest Ohio.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) composite quality score A national hospital measure used to identify and reward hospitals for quality care. National mean is reported as 0 One standard deviation above the national mean UTMC
Rating on question "How would you rate your hospital?" in the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS)A national, standardized survey of patients' perspectives on hospital care. 69% 83% UTMC
Number of new patients 35,049 Increase by 20% UTMC, UTP
Goal 4: Increase philanthropy in support of the University’s strategic goals.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
Undergraduate alumni annual giving participation rate 5.25% 8% with annual growth of 0.25% VPA, UTF, Alum, Dev
Total fundraising to the University as measured by total gift amountAmount of new gifts, pledges, gifts-in-kind and face value of deferred gifts. FY 2016 three-year moving average $18.3 million Increase by 5% annually over a three-year rolling average VPA, UTF, Alum, Dev
Support provided from the UT Foundation to the University FY 2016 five-year moving average $14.75 million Increase by 5% annually over the five-year moving average VPA, UTF, Dev
Planning and initiation of a comprehensive capital campaign 0% 100% President, Provost, VPA, UTF, Alum, Dev, MarCom
Goal 5: Increase promotion of the “Rocket” brand institutionally, locally, regionally and nationally via marketing and promotional efforts.
OUTCOMES BASELINE 2016 TARGET 2022 RESPONSIBILITY ARCHIVED PROGRESS PROGRESS NOVEMBER 2018
GPA ranking for student-athletes among all Mid-American Conference (MAC) institutions Ranked No. 1 among MAC institutions with 3.202 GPA Maintain No. 1 ranking among MAC institutions Provost, All Colleges, Ath
Fan attendance at UT sporting events 28,386 attendees at football, men's and women's basketball Increase fan attendance by 2% annually Ath

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Overall undergraduate first-year retention rate


  • Increased fall-to-spring retention rate by 1.3% (89.3% from 2016-17 to 90.6% from 2017-18).

  • A Student Success Task Force was established in fall 2017 to inventory best practices in student retention and completion, and recommendations were made to the Provost in May of 2018 for review and implementation in fall 2018 and following.

  • A Student Advising Task Force was established in fall 2017 and recommendations were made in May 2018 to revise the general advising structure and to establish a centralized pre-professional advising office. The Office of the Provost is reviewing the task force’s recommendations.

  • A First-Year Experience Task Force was established in fall 2017 and recommendations were made to the provost in May 2018 to implement a new model for the First-Year Experience program in fall 2018.

  • In fall 2017, D-grade, failure-grade and withdrawal (DFW) rates decreased for 16 of the 20 first- and second-year courses that previously had the highest DFW rates, and 80 percent of the top 20 courses with the highest DFW rates showed improvement. Spring 2018 courses will be analyzed once grades are finalized.

  • A Retention Solutions Team was created by the Division of Student Affairs with representation from the Office of the Provost, Office of New Student Orientation Programs, Office of Residence Life, Office of Financial Aid and the Center for Success Coaching.

  • The Learning Enhancement Center and the Writing Center substantially increased tutoring support this year by adding walk-in hours, expanding the number of science tutors by 33 percent and expanding tutoring in world languages and engineering. The Learning Enhancement Center and the Writing Center served more than 5,000 students during the 2017-18 academic year.

  • In the summer of 2017, UT piloted an early-arrival, summer bridge program in University College – the Summer Scholars Program – with 40 first-year students. The overall retention rate for students who participated in the program showed a higher overall, fall-to-spring retention rate and GPA when compared to students with similar characteristics (95% compared to 83%; and 2.29 compared to 1.71).

  • In the summer of 2018, the Summer Scholars program will expand to include an additional five colleges with the aspirational goal of enrolling 180 students in the six participating colleges.

  • In December 2017, the Office of the Provost hired a student success systems administrator to configure and expand the use of Starfish Retention Solutions and Platinum Analytics.

  • Expansion of the Starfish Early Alert System is underway with the College of Arts and Letters, the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and University College now in the system, and is a work in progress with the College of Engineering and the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

  • Training guides and training sessions were held for advisors and faculty throughout spring 2018 semester.

  • The Starfish Early Alert System was expanded to include College Credit Plus students, student-athletes and students in the College of Arts and Letters' 1000/2000-level courses.

October 2017

Outcome: Overall undergraduate first-year retention rate


  • A Student Success Task Force was established in October 2017 to inventory student retention and success efforts on campus and at other universities, assess their effectiveness and recommend a set of best practices for implementation at UT.

  • A workshop was held for chairs, associate deans, deans and provost’s staff on best practices at the national level related to student retention and success (Educational Advisory Board presenters, November 2017).

  • A Student Advising Task Force was established to develop recommendations to improve advising systems across campus, including early alert software, and other predictive analytics.

  • A First Year Experience Task Force was established in fall 2017 with the charge to recommend a model for a new First Year Experience program to implement at UT in the fall of 2018.

  • Piloted early-arrival programs/bridge programs and learning community programs for new students in summer 2017 with the goal of expanding these high-impact educational practices to additional cohorts of students during the next five years.

  • Academic Leadership Team members met in October 2017 (provost’s office staff, deans, associate deans, chairs) to discuss high rate of DFW grades (D grade/failure grade/withdraw grade) in identified courses and sections of courses, and to analyze their causes and identify action for improvement.

  • Communications to all faculty were sent to ensure timely, mid-term grade reporting to provide students and advisers with timely information for proactive decision making and planning.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Overall undergraduate first-year retention rate


  • The first-to-second year retention rate increased by 1.5 percent, from 74.4 percent in 2016-17 to 75.9 percent in 2017-18.

  • During the 2017-18 academic year, the DFW (D grade, fail, withdraw) rate decreased in 75 percent of courses with the highest DFW rates.

  • During the summer of 2017, UT piloted an early-arrival, summer bridge program called “Summer Scholars” in University College with 36 incoming freshmen. Students who participated in the Summer Scholars program showed a higher overall retention rate from fall 2017 to fall 2018, as well as a higher overall GPA compared to other students in University College and compared to students across the University with similar characteristics. The fall 2017 to fall 2018 retention rate of Summer Scholars students was 66 percent, compared to 47 percent of their University College peers, and compared to 57 percent of overall University students with similar characteristics. This is a 9 percent higher retention rate among Summer Scholars when compared to overall UT students and a 19 percent higher retention rate among Summer Scholars students compared to their peers in University College. In addition, the cumulative GPA for 2017 Summer Scholars students was 2.13, compared to 1.86 of the University College comparison group.

  • During the summer of 2018, the early-arrival summer bridge program called “Summer Scholars” was expanded to include 93 students who participated from five colleges, including University College, as well as the colleges of Arts and Letters, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Health and Human Services and the Judith Herb College of Education.

  • A Retention Solutions Team was established by the Division of Student Affairs last year with representation from the Office of the Provost, Student Orientation, Housing, Financial Aid and the Office of Success Coaching. The team reviews situations of students evicted from campus housing for financial reasons, addresses mental-health issues and issues related to student financial issues, overall, as well as student employment.

  • The Division of Student Affairs awarded more than $168,000 to 190 undergraduate students as part of the University’s “Rocket Recovery” grant program, and 96 percent of the students who received emergency funding were retained from fall 2017 to spring 2018.

  • A First-Year Experience Orientation Course Committee was established in fall 2018 to redesign the first-year experience orientation course to improve the impact on student retention and success, with joint leadership from Faculty Senate and the Office of the Provost.

  • In fall 2018, the Office of the Provost established a new program (Program for Academic Excellence) that would provide seed funding support for faculty and/or colleges to encourage innovative projects and programs that promote student success. Fifteen projects received one-year support.

  • At the fall 2018 meeting of the Academic Leadership Team (which consists of all department chairs, associate and assistant deans, college deans and staff in the Office of the Provost), the Office of the Provost launched a student success initiative called “Focusing on Being a Student-Centered University,” which focuses on the implementation of strategies at the department and college levels that are designed to promote and strengthen UT’s commitment to being a “student-centered university.”

  • The Learning Enhancement Center had a 4 percent increase in students who sought tutoring and a 9 percent increase in the number of student visits from spring 2017 to spring 2018. In addition, the Learning Enhancement Center added online sessions for supplemental instruction in the spring of 2017; the number of students who participated in these online sessions increased by 44 percent from spring 2017 to spring 2018.

  • The number of points of contact between Success Coaches (Center for Success Coaching) and undergraduate students increased by 60 percent from 2016-17 to 2017-18 (from 238,732 students in 2016-17 to 397,990 students in 2017-18).

  • A total of 405 students attended Success Series workshops offered by the Center for Success Coaching during the 2017-18 academic year.

  • During the 2017-18 academic year, the University’s Starfish Early Alert system was expanded to include all 1000-/2000-level, undergraduate, general education courses in the College of Arts and Letters, as well as all courses for student-athletes. Early alert efforts continued with lower-level mathematics courses in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and lower-level English courses in the College of Arts and Letters. The early alert system had an impact on twice as many undergraduate students last year, compared to the previous academic year (9,883 students in 2017-18 and 4,127 students in 2016-17).

  • The University of Toledo is participating in a statewide initiative called the Ohio “Strong-Start-to-Finish” initiative, which is designed to strengthen student success and address attainment gaps for underserved minority students.

  • The University of Toledo is participating in two highly competitive national programs of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU), including: (i) the “Student Experience Project” of the APLU, which is designed to improve success among underrepresented minority students in STEM programs; and (ii) the APLU’s “Transformation Cluster Initiative” that includes 100 universities across the nation working collaboratively in regional clusters to create and test solutions that help students succeed in college, complete their degrees and be well-prepared for the workforce.

  • An associate vice provost for student success and an associate vice provost for faculty development related to student success were appointed in August 2018 to provide leadership for student success initiatives in the Office of the Provost.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Overall undergraduate six-year graduation rate


  • As of spring commencement in May 2018, 47.1 percent of the fall 2012 cohort of entering students graduated in six years, compared to the 2016 baseline of a 43 percent six-year graduation rate.

  • A Student Success Task Force was established in fall 2017 to inventory best practices in student retention and completion, and recommendations were made to the provost in May 2018 for review and implementation in fall 2018 and beyond.

  • A Student Advising Task Force was established in fall 2017 and two final reports were submitted in May 2018 with recommendations for revisions to the general advising structure and for the development of a centralized pre-professional advising office. The Office of the Provost is reviewing the task force’s recommendations.

  • The Office of the Provost continued to promote the University’s “15-to-Finish” initiative among faculty and advisors to encourage students to take 15-plus credits each semester to stay on track to a four-year graduation.

  • A committee to review bottleneck courses and make necessary adjustments to the course schedule was established.

  • A task force was established to develop competency-based education (CBE) at UT, and planning is underway to develop and pilot CBE courses in University College.

  • Software tool improvements were implemented to help students plan more effectively, including the graduation planning system (GPS), which is designed to help students identify courses that will transfer and help monitor their progress. The GPS is a collaboration between the Office of the Provost and the Division of Information Technology and includes three areas: transferology, an online tool that helps transfer students view program requirements; u.direct, which leverages degree audit data to create interactive roadmaps that define a clear path to graduation; and u.achieve, which is a degree audit program that provides students and advisors with an easy-to-read progress report and degree requirements for graduation.

October 2017

Outcome: Overall undergraduate six-year graduation rate


  • The University will pilot Winter Intersession courses this year to provide additional opportunities for students to take courses they need to complete their degrees.

  • New spring registration schedule adopted to enhance students’ ability to register early to ensure their enrollment in courses they need to graduate in a timely manner.

  • The development of Transfer Pathways is under way to improve success of transfer students, including retention and time-to-degree.

  • The University launched a "15-to-Finish" campaign to encourage students to register for 15 credit hours per semester in order to graduate in four years.

  • The University is expanding summer course offerings in summer of 2018 to provide additional opportunities for students to stay on track to graduate in a timely manner.

  • The colleges and departments reviewed courses with high D/F/W rates (D grade, Failure grade, and Withdraw grade) as barriers to completion and identified ways to address the disparities.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Overall undergraduate six-year graduation rate


  • The six-year graduation rate for undergraduate students increased by 5.5 percent, from 41.9 percent in 2017 (for the 2011 cohort) to 47.4 percent in 2018 (for the 2012 cohort).

  • Degree requirements for a substantial number of academic programs have been reduced to 120 credit hours, while not jeopardizing accreditation requirements in order to improve time-to-degree for undergraduate students. As of fall 2018, 43 undergraduate degree programs have been approved at 120 credit hours and an additional seven academic programs are currently in the approval process, which will brings the total to 50 academic programs by the end of the fall 2018 semester. This constitutes 49 percent of the University’s academic programs now requiring 120 credit hours to graduate, and the Office of the Provost is working with the colleges to identify additional programs to submit for reduction during the current 2018-19 academic year.

  • Through the use of Platinum Analytics systems, the University is able to predict student demand for courses and determine the supply of seats needed to ensure on-time program completion. Using Platinum Analytics during fall semester 2018, the Office of the Provost was able to make 18 course recommendations to the colleges, highlighting high-demand courses. The colleges made changes that allowed an additional 172 students to enroll in courses needed for degree completion.

  • During the current academic year (2018-19), a pilot program is underway to provide Competency-Based Education (CBE) in three online courses in the Department of Applied Organizational Technology, with the goal of decreasing time-to-degree based on students’ satisfactory progress in meeting course requirements. An additional six CBE courses will be piloted during the spring 2019 semester.

  • The University will implement the second year of offering winter intersession courses for students interested in continuing to make progress toward their degrees during the winter break.

  • The University continues to work on expanding summer session courses in 2018 to provide students with additional opportunities to reduce time-to-degree and make progress toward graduation.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Percent gap for first-year retention rate between minority students and majority students


  • An ad hoc committee of the Student Success Task Force was established and recommendations were submitted to the Office of the Provost and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion in May of 2018 for the implementation of initiatives to improve student retention rates among underrepresented minority students.

  • A Retention Solutions Team was created by the Division of Student Affairs with representation from the Office of the Provost, the Office of New Student Orientation Programs, the Office of Residence Life, the Office of Financial Aid and the Center for Success Coaching.

  • Thirty (30) first-year students participated this year (2017-18) in the fourth cohort of the Multicultural Emerging Scholars Program (MESP), which includes a summer bridge program and living-learning community for underrepresented minority students making the transition from high school to college. Students who participated in the MESP in 2017 received higher GPAs than the general student population with a similar profile in fall 2017.

  • The vice president for diversity and inclusion co-chaired the Student Success Task Force during the 2017-18 academic year and in spring 2018 convened an ad hoc committee to propose additional strategies to address the retention gap between minority and majority students at UT. Recommendations from the task force and the ad hoc committee will be implemented in fall semester 2018.

  • The Office of Multicultural Student Success collaborated with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion to create the Multicultural Orientation and Resources for Excellence (M.O.R.E.) program to provide co-curricular learning opportunities that contribute to student success among underrepresented minority students.

  • In the fall of 2017, the Division of Student Affairs launched the “M.O.R.E. Monday” program to create co-curricular learning opportunities that contribute to student success among underrepresented minority students.

  • The Division of Student Affairs established the M.O.R.E. Institute; an early arrival program for first-year students from multicultural backgrounds and their parents/guardians.

  • The Division of Student Affairs continues to implement mentoring programs for underrepresented minority students, including Teaching and Aspiring Women Leaders (TAWL); Brothers on the Rise; and the Primos program.

October 2017

Outcome: Percent gap for first-year retention rate between minority students and majority students


  • Vice president for diversity and inclusion co-chairing Student Success Task Force with interim vice provost for student success.

  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion collaborated with Office of Multicultural Student Success to create M.O.R.E. (Multicultural Orientation and Resources for Excellence) semester program.

  • In September 2017, the Division of Student Affairs launched M.O.R.E. Mondays, an initiative designed to create co-curricular learning opportunities in support of student success.

  • Vice president for diversity and inclusion serves as co-director of third cohort of students in the Multicultural Emerging Scholars (summer bridge) program.

  • Vice president for diversity and inclusion serves as president of Brothers on the Rise mentoring program for African-American and Latino males.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Percent gap for first-year retention rate between minority students and majority students


  • The raw percentage gap for first-year retention between underrepresented minority students and majority students decreased by 5.44 percent for the 2017 cohort. The retention gap for the 2017 cohort was 14.3 percent, compared to 19.74 percent for the 2016 cohort.

  • Thirty (30) first-year students participated in the fifth cohort of the 2018 early-arrival Multicultural Emerging Scholars (MESP) summer bridge program, which includes an early-arrival program and living-learning community.

  • Students who participated in MESP were provided support through peer student mentoring, which continued during the fall 2018 semester.

  • The Office of Multicultural Student Success established the Multicultural Orientation and Resources for Excellence (M.O.R.E.) program to provide co-curricular learning opportunities designed to contribute to student success for underrepresented minority students. It also established the M.O.R.E. Institute, which is an early-arrival program for first-year, underrepresented minority students and their parents/guardians. M.O.R.E. Institute participants (87) had higher grade-point averages (2.3 average GPA) and earned more credit hours (11 credit hours) than students with similar preparation. In addition, 94 percent of the students who participated in the M.O.R.E. Institute were retained from fall 2017 to spring 2018.

  • Last year, the Division of Student Affairs implemented the M.O.R.E. Monday program designed to engage underrepresented minority students in co-curricular learning opportunities that contribute to student success. The 29 students who participated in the M.O.R.E. Monday program had an average GPA of 2.55 in spring 2018 and over 89% of these students returned in fall of 2018.

  • The Office of Residence Life hosted a resource fair for high-risk, underrepresented minority students living in temporary housing.

  • The Division of Student Affairs continues to implement mentoring programs for underrepresented minority students, including Teaching and Aspiring Women Leaders (TAWL), Brothers on the Rise and the Primos program. Note that there was an 89 percent retention rate in fall 2018 among the 17 students who participated in the TAWL program during the 2017-18 academic year and a 75 percent retention rate in fall 2018 among the 11 first-year Latino students who participated in the Primos mentoring program during the 2017-18 academic year.

  • This year, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion established a pilot retention initiative for underrepresented minority students in the colleges of Engineering and Arts and Letters, as well as the Judith Herb College of Education.

  • A diversity and inclusion presentation was made at each of the fall 2018 student orientation sessions by members of the Office of Multicultural Student Success team.

  • The University of Toledo is participating in a statewide initiative called the Ohio “Strong-Start-to-Finish” initiative, which is designed to strengthen student success and address attainment gaps for underserved students.

  • The University of Toledo is participating in a national program of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU) - the “Student Experience Project” - which is designed to improve success among underrepresented minority students in STEM programs.

  • Among this year’s cohort of Fellows in the Office of the Provost, two Fellows were appointed to work with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion to identify best practices related to retention and completion among underrepresented minority students for implementation at UT.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Percent gap for six-year graduation rate between minority students and majority students


  • An ad hoc committee of the Student Success Task Force was established and recommendations were submitted to the Office of the Provost and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion in May of 2018 for the implementation of initiatives to improve graduation rates among underrepresented minority students.

  • The Office of Multicultural Student Success collaborated with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion to create the M.O.R.E. (Multicultural Orientation and Resources for Excellence) program to provide co-curricular learning opportunities that contribute to student success among underrepresented minority students.

  • In the fall of 2017, the Division of Student Affairs launched the “M.O.R.E. Monday” program to create co-curricular learning opportunities that contribute to student success among underrepresented minority students.

  • The Division of Student Affairs established the M.O.R.E. Institute, an early arrival program for first-year students from multicultural backgrounds and their parents/guardians.

  • The Division of Student Affairs continues to implement mentoring programs for underrepresented minority students, including Teaching and Aspiring Women Leaders (TAWL), Brothers on the Rise and Primos.

October 2017

Outcome: Percent gap for six-year graduation rate between minority students and majority students


  • Vice president for diversity and inclusion co-chairing Student Success Task Force with interim vice provost for student success.

  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion collaborated with Office of Multicultural Student Success to create M.O.R.E. (Multicultural Orientation and Resources for Excellence) semester program.

  • In September 2017, the Division of Student Affairs launched M.O.R.E. Mondays, an initiative designed to create co-curricular learning opportunities in support of student success.

  • Vice president for diversity and inclusion serves as co-director of third cohort of students in the Multicultural Emerging Scholars (summer bridge) program.

  • Vice president for diversity and inclusion serves as president of Brothers on the Rise mentoring program for African-American and Latino males.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Percent gap for six-year graduation rate between minority students and majority students


  • The raw percentage gap for the six-year graduation rate between underrepresented minority students and majority students decreased by 3.03 percent in 2018 for the 2012 cohort. The six-year graduation rate gap for the 2012 cohort was 32.26 percent, compared to 35.29 percent for the 2011 cohort.

  • In addition to the Summer Scholars early-arrival summer bridge program noted above (I. 1.1.), 30 students participated in the 2018 early-arrival Multicultural Emerging Scholars Program (MESP) summer bridge program.

  • Students who participated in MESP were provided support through peer student mentoring, which continued during fall 2018 semester.

  • This year, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion established a pilot retention initiative for underrepresented minority students in the colleges of Engineering and Arts and Letters, as well as the Judith Herb College of Education.

  • A diversity and inclusion presentation was made at each of the fall 2018 student orientation sessions by members of the Office of Multicultural Student Success team.

  • Among this year’s cohort of Fellows in the Office of the Provost, a Fellow was appointed to work with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion to identify best practices related to retention and completion among underrepresented minority students for implementation at UT.

  • The University of Toledo is participating in a statewide initiative called the Ohio “Strong-Start-to-Finish” initiative, which is designed to strengthen student success and address attainment gaps for underserved students.

  • The University of Toledo is participating in a national programs of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU) - the “Student Experience Project” which is designed to improve success among underrepresented minority students in STEM programs.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Student support as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement score "support for overall well-being"

  • The results of the National Survey of Student Engagement from 2016-17 are being reviewed by the leadership team in the Division of Student Affairs to determine actions that might be taken to improve student satisfaction and student success.

  • The National Survey of Student Engagement is administered in alternate years and will next be administered in February-March 2019.

October 2017

Outcome: Student support as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement score "support for overall well-being"


  • Results of National Survey on Student Engagement (NSSE) data to be shared in spring 2018, which will lead to action items to address survey results.

  • Next NSSE survey will be conducted in spring 2019.

  • Next Campus Climate Survey will be conducted in April 2018.

  • Provost, interim vice president for student affairs and chair of Faculty Senate are actively promoting “Rocket Care” portal to faculty and staff as a preventive tool to identify students in need of assistance (academic or other).

  • Provost and interim vice president for student affairs are actively promoting the Student Food Pantry as a resource on campus to address food insecurity among our students.

  • Division of Student Affairs has secured a grant to provide $200,000 in emergency grant funding (maximum $1,000 per grant) to students in need during the 2017-2018 academic year.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Student support as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement score "support for overall well-being"


  • The University of Toledo administers the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) in alternate years, with the next NSSE survey to be administered in the spring of 2019.

  • The results of the National Survey of Student Engagement from 2016-17 are being reviewed by the Student Affairs Leadership Team (SALT), with an action plan to address survey results and develop strategies to improve student satisfaction and success to be completed by May 2019.

  • The Division of Student Affairs implemented the “Rocket Care” initiative in collaboration with the Faculty Senate in fall 2017, and 55 percent (180) of the 327 students who had a Rocket Care form submitted on their behalf returned to classes in fall 2018.

  • During the 2017-18 academic year, 60 percent of students who used the University’s food pantry returned to classes in fall 2018 (525 students used the food pantry in 2017-18 and 315 of these students were retained in fall 2018).

  • The Division of Student Affairs awarded more than $168,000 to 190 undergraduate students as part of the University’s “Rocket Recovery” grant program, and 96 percent of the students who received emergency funding during the 2017-18 academic year were retained from fall 2017 to spring 2018.

  • UT is among 208 colleges and universities nationwide receiving the “Best for Vets in 2019” (veterans) designation, according to the Military Times’ annual survey.

  • UT received the Governor’s Distinguished Hispanic Ohioan Award in October 2018 at the 38th Annual Hispanic Ohioans gala event. UT was chosen in the category of “Nuestra Familia,” or “Our Family,” which honors individuals and organizations that encourage the inclusion of Latinos in Ohio and are committed to making the state a welcoming place for everyone.

  • UT launched an electric scooter-sharing program on Main Campus in fall 2018 to provide students with additional modes of environmentally friendly transportation on campus and to provide students with an opportunity to enjoy a new experience as part of campus life. During the first two months that the Lime scooters were on campus, more than 5,500 students, faculty and staff logged more than 19,000 miles; the scooters were used for 32,000 trips, with the average trip on campus being .42 miles. UT is among the top-performing universities in the U.S. for Lime scooter adoption.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Reduction in number of undergraduate degree programs that are more than 120 credit hours


  • The Office of the Provost worked closely this year with the colleges, academic departments and Faculty Senate to reduce the number of undergraduate degree programs that require more than 120 credit-hours to complete the degree. In 2016, only four programs met the goal of 120 credit-hours for completion and by May 2018, an additional 46 programs have been revised to now require 120 credit-hours to complete the degree. (Note that 42 of these 46 program revisions were approved by the Faculty Senate in 2017-18, and four of these program revisions have completed their departmental-level reviews, with college reviews and Faculty Senate approval to take place in fall 2018.)

October 2017

Outcome: Reduction in number of undergraduate degree programs that are more than 120 credit hours


  • A review of credit-hour requirements for all degree programs was undertaken and the number of general electives in each program was identified. Program modifications are under way, and departments and colleges continue to evaluate which programs can move to 120 credit hours this year. To date, 25 program modifications are near completion.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 1: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Reduction in number of undergraduate degree programs that are more than 120 credit hours


  • The Office of the Provost is working closely with academic programs to reduce the number of undergraduate degree programs that require more than 120 credit hours to graduate.

  • Degree requirements for a substantial number of academic programs have been reduced to 120 credit hours, while not jeopardizing accreditation requirements to improve time-to-degree for undergraduate students. As of fall 2018, 43 undergraduate degree programs have been approved at 120 credit hours, and an additional seven academic programs are in the approval process, which will bring the total to 50 academic programs by the end of the fall 2018 semester. This constitutes 49 percent of the University’s academic programs now requiring 120 credit hours to graduate. The Office of the Provost is working with the colleges to identify additional programs to submit for reduction during the 2018-19 academic year.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Two-year graduation rate of full-time master's degree students


  • The College of Graduate Studies is in the process of identifying and implementing student success analytics software to facilitate tracking of graduate student progress toward the degree.

  • The College of Graduate Studies is reviewing alternative formats for graduate programs that are responsive to students’ needs (e.g., summer only, evening classes, undergraduate/graduate dual-enrollment programs, online and/or blended degree programs, etc.) to improve the two-year graduation rate of full-time master’s degree students.

  • The College of Graduate Studies is in the process of developing – and requiring – professional development for graduate faculty in the areas of graduate student mentoring and diversity and inclusion.

October 2017

Outcome: Two-year graduation rate of full-time master's degree students


  • Dean of the College of Graduate Studies is working with Graduate Council Executive Committee to decrease number of “incomplete” and “progress” grades to students (IN/PR) to reduce time-to-degree.

  • The dean of the College of Graduate Studies is working with a subcommittee of deans to identify best practices for retention and completion rates of graduate and professional students (to be completed by Feb. 1, 2018).

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Two-year graduation rate of full-time master's degree students


  • New professional-development initiatives are being implemented for graduate students and faculty to support mentoring, scholarship, writing and research.

  • The College of Graduate Studies is supporting student advising practices and allocating graduate student funds to support a two-year graduation rate for full-time master’s students.

  • In an effort to increase access and time-to-degree, the College of Graduate Studies is working, in collaboration with UT Online, to develop opportunities to expand and promote online graduate course offerings.

  • Among this year’s cohort of Fellows in the Office of the Provost, two were appointed to work with the College of Graduate Studies: (i) a Fellow to identify potential funding sources and develop external grants to increase support for graduate education; and (ii) a Fellow to assist the College of Graduate Studies in efforts to expand and develop interdisciplinary graduate curriculum.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Graduate and professional students' entrance exam scores


  • The current LSAT medium for students entering the College of Law is 152, up from the 150.7 baseline established in 2016.

  • For the 2017 entering class in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, the median of MCAT scores was 506-511, corresponding to the national percentile range of the 71st to 85th percentile.

October 2017

Outcome: Graduate and professional students' entrance exam scores


  • The College of Law has improved students’ entering credentials over the past two years, with the median LSAT increasing from 151 in 2015 to 152 in 2017.

  • In addition, the 25th percentile improved from 147 in 2015 to 150 in 2017; and the median undergraduate GPA increased from 3.27 in 2015 to 3.41 in 2017.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Graduate and professional students' entrance exam scores


  • The current LSAT medium for students entering the College of Law is 152, increased from the 150.7 baseline established in 2016.

  • For the 2018 entering class in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, the middle 50 percent of MCAT scores was 506-511, unchanged from last year, corresponding to the national percentile range of 71st - 85th percentile.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Licensure and board pass rates


  • The College of Law has implemented a number of initiatives during the last several years to improve graduate bar success, and graduates achieved a 78 percent first-time pass rate in February 2018 Ohio Bar exam results, which ranked second in the state of Ohio, compared to 54 percent and 7th in the state last year.

  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences has revised its curriculum and integrated foundational and clinical science into the clinical clerkship (August 2017) to improve student learning outcomes and enhance board pass rates for medical students.

  • During the last four years (2014-17), the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences has a higher than national average pass rate by first-time takers on the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) and seeks to maintain this position. UT’s first-time takers pass rate on NAPLEX was 90.59 percent in 2017, compared to the national average of 87.95 percent.

October 2017

Outcome: Licensure and board pass rates


  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences has reorganized its curriculum to improve learning outcomes (August 2017), integrated foundational and clinical science in the clinical clerkship (August 2017), and developed new courses to enhance clinical teaching (to be implemented in July 2018).

  • Over the last three years (2014-2016), the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences has a higher than national average pass rate by first-time takers on the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) and seeks to maintain this position. UT’s first-time takers pass rate on NAPLEX was 91.01% in 2016, compared to the national average of 85.86%.

  • The College of Law increased the first-time pass rate by 11% this year and the College has taken multiple steps over the last two years to improve graduate bar success; including creating the position of Director of Academic Success and Bar Preparation, creating an academic support program, adding a new bar preparation course for third-year law students, and creating a faculty bar mentoring program. This year the College will enter into a contract with BarBRi to provide comprehensive bar services with the goal of increasing bar exam success among our students.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Licensure and board pass rates


  • College of Law graduates achieved an 84 percent, first-time pass rate on the July 2018 Ohio Bar exam results, an increase of 10 percent from July 2017 (74 percent first-time pass rate in July 2017), above the state average in Ohio this year at 79 percent.

  • The College of Law has implemented a number of initiatives during the last several years to improve graduates' bar exam success, including aligning the college’s curriculum with bar-tested subjects, developing a new first-year support program, expanding the college’s third-year bar preparation course and implementing a legal analysis course and academic success contracts. The college also established the position of director of academic success and bar preparation, with the director providing oversight of the Bar Passage program designed to prepare both third-year students and graduates for the bar exam. Through post-graduation mentoring, every UT College of Law graduate is paired with a faculty member to provide support during bar exam study.

  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences had a pass rate of 97 percent on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE)/Step 1, compared to the national pass rate of 96 percent, and the college had a mean score of 230, above the national mean score of 229.

  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences had a pass rate of 96 percent on the USMLE/Step 2, compared to the national pass rate of 97 percent, and the college had a mean score of 244, above the national mean score of 243.

  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences had a pass rate of 98 percent on the USMLE/Step 3, compared to the national pass rate of 98 percent. (Note that mean scores were not provided.)

  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences has implemented a number of initiatives to improve learning outcomes and enhance board pass rates for medical students, including revising the curriculum and integrating foundational and clinical science into the clinical clerkship (August 2017). Planning is underway for exam preparation courses for USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 courses to be offered in the summer of 2019.

  • During the last four years (2014-2017), the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences has had a higher-than-national average pass rate by first-time takers on the North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) and seeks to maintain this position. UT’s first-time takers’ pass rate on NAPLEX was 90.59 percent in 2017, compared to the national average of 87.95 percent.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Percent of graduating medical residents who enter practice in northwest Ohio


  • The Office of Graduate Medical Education established a GME resident physician recruiter to provide outreach to medical schools on behalf of the University’s residency program to recruit a diverse group of residents to the region.

  • A goal was established to increase UT student Match into UT Graduate Medical Education programs, and 20 UT students were retained in 2018.

  • A reorganization of the third year clerkships is underway.

  • Plans are being developed to increase the number of practitioner recruitment events during their residency period.

October 2017

Outcome: Percent of graduating medical residents who enter practice in northwest Ohio


  • The Office of Graduate Medical Education has established a GME resident physician recruiter to provide outreach with medical schools on behalf of the University’s residency programs. Recruiting candidates from the region into residency and the development of fellowship programs to assist in retaining a high-quality workforce in northwest Ohio are part of the overall focus of this position.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Percent of graduating medical residents who enter practice in northwest Ohio


  • The Office of Graduate Medical Education established a GME resident physician recruiter to provide outreach to medical schools on behalf of the University’s residency program to recruit a diverse group of residents to the region.

  • Goal to increase the number of UT students who match into UT Graduate Medical Education programs; and 20 UT students retained in 2018.

  • A reorganization of the third-year clerkships is underway.

  • Plans are being developed to increase the number of practitioner recruitment events during their residency periods.

  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences is currently evaluating an incentive plan to retain UT residents as family medicine faculty.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of new residences or fellowships available at ProMedica Toledo Hospital and ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital


  • A committee was established for yearly review of new residency/fellowship program requests.

  • An endocrinology fellowship program was established.

  • An internal medicine primary care track was established for the core residency, beginning in July 2018.

  • The establishment of an anesthesia critical care fellowship has been approved.

  • A rheumatology fellowship has been established.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of new residences or fellowships available at ProMedica Toledo Hospital and ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital


  • There has been a significant commitment to grow graduate medical education through Promedica Toledo Hospital and Toledo Children's Hospital and reach the goal of an increase in residency/fellowship programs with the establishment of an endocrinology fellowship, and approval to establish a rheumatology fellowship, internal medicine residency primary track, and anesthesiology critical-care fellowship program.

  • Additionally, the UT family medicine residency program was approved to expand to strengthen primary care training in northwest Ohio.

  • The Graduate Medical Education Office has established an annual process to evaluate requests for new or expanding residency/fellowship programs in alignment with the strategic initiatives of the Academic Affiliation.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 2: IMPROVE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH TIMELY DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of new residences or fellowships available at ProMedica Toledo Hospital and ProMedica Toledo Children's Hospital


  • A committee was established for yearly review of new residency/fellowship program requests.

  • An endocrinology fellowship program was established.

  • An internal medicine primary care track was established for the core residency; it began in July 2018.

  • The establishment of an anesthesia critical care fellowship has been approved.

  • A rheumatology fellowship has been established.

  • A sports medicine fellowship has been established, with UT assuming sponsorship of this program from ProMedica.

  • A forensic pathology fellowship has been approved.

  • A new program in hematology/oncology has been approved.

  • Note that the College of Medicine and Life Sciences has established six additional programs since 2016, with the 2022 target goal to establish eight additional programs.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

May 2018

Outcome: Program-level student learning outcomes, assessments and achievements aligned to UT's Institutional Student Learning Outcomes as documented in an annual review process


  • All academic programs are revising their assessment plans to align program student learning outcomes (SLOs) with the new Institutional Student Learning Outcomes (ISLOs).

  • During the 2017-18 academic year, four colleges completed the revisions for their academic programs, and three colleges are close to completing their revisions. The remaining four colleges continue to make progress in the development of their revised student learning outcomes.

  • The Office of the Provost is working with the University Assessment Committee (UAC) to develop and implement a process for measuring UT’s institutional-level student learning outcomes, and the decision was made to identify a nationally normed instrument/metric to measure the University’s learning outcomes.

  • UT is now participating in the Association of American Colleges & Universities’ VALUE (Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education) initiative, and two UT faculty are being trained as reviewers for the AAC&U VALUE rubric. Samples of students’ work will be collected in the fall of 2018 and the first ISLO to be assessed as part of this initiative is “critical thinking.”

October 2017

Outcome: Program-level student learning outcomes, assessments and achievements aligned to UT's Institutional Student Learning Outcomes as documented in an annual review process


  • The vice provost for academic affairs is working with the Office of Assessment, Accreditation and Program Review and the colleges to identify program-level learning outcomes (2017-18 academic year).

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

November 2018

Outcome: Program-level student learning outcomes, assessments and achievements aligned to UT's Institutional Student Learning Outcomes as documented in an annual review process


  • Academic programs are revising their assessment plans to align program student learning outcomes (SLOs) with the new Institutional Student Learning Outcomes (ISLOs).

  • By fall 2018, 214 of 307 academic and service units (70%) have updated and submitted revised plans to align SLOs with ISLOs, and these plans have been reviewed by their University Assessment Committee (UAC) liaison; 26 of 307 academic and service units (8%) have submitted revised plans and are awaiting review by their respective UAC liaison; 31 of 307 academic and service units (10%) are in the process of revising their plans; and 36 of 307 academic and service units (12%) have not yet started to update their plans to the new template.

  • UT is now using a nationally normed instrument to assess student learning outcomes and is participating in the American Association of American Colleges & Universities’ VALUE (Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education) assessment initiative.

  • A team of seven faculty members was selected in fall 2018 to participate in the institutional assessment of student work related to the “critical thinking” learning outcome, and these faculty will pilot the implementation of the “critical thinking” VALUE rubric in their courses in the spring of 2019, with feedback from AAC&U to follow.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

May 2018

Outcome: Percentage of distance-learning courses that are Quality Matters-certified or meet Quality Matters standards


  • The percentage of distance-learning courses for which a version of the course received official Quality Matters certification or meets Quality Matters standards (per internal review) increased from 8.5 percent in 2016 to 14.6 percent in 2017.

October 2017

Outcome: Percentage of distance-learning courses that are Quality Matters-certified or meet Quality Matters standards


  • The vice provost for academic affairs is working with a subcommittee of the Council of Deans/provost’s office staff to develop a plan to increase percentage of Quality Matters-certified distance-learning courses (to be completed Feb. 1, 2018).

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

November 2018

Outcome: Percentage of distance-learning courses that are Quality Matters-certified or meet Quality Matters standards


  • UT Online continues to increase the percentage of online courses for which a version of the course received official Quality Matters (QM) certification or meets Quality Matters standards (per internal review), with a total of 18.2 percent of courses now meeting QM certification or QM standards (i.e., meeting QM standards, but not officially certified.) (Note: 18.2 percent of QM-certified or meets standards include data through Oct. 11, 2018.)

  • As of November 2018, UT ranked third in the number of courses (32) receiving QM certification during the 2018 calendar year of the 176 institutions across the nation that have at least one course receiving official QM certification.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of undergraduate-to-graduate pipeline programs


  • The College of Graduate Studies is conducting an inventory of current master’s degree programs to identify programs with potential to develop pipelines to related undergraduate majors.

  • The College of Graduate Studies is developing clear guidelines and procedures for the establishment of undergraduate-to-graduate pipeline programs that are congruent with Higher Learning Commission (HLC) accreditation guidelines and Ohio Department of Higher Education guidelines on credit-hour limitations, registration and financial aid considerations.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of undergraduate-to-graduate pipeline programs


  • The College of Graduate Studies has developed a template for the development of “pipeline” programs in collaboration with the Office of the Registrar in order to improve coding and procedures that impact students, such as financial aid (to be completed by July 2018).

  • The College of Graduate Studies is developing a BSPS/MS Law in Regulatory Compliance and a pipeline program for the MA in geography.

  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences is reviewing data on historical outcomes to determine the feasibility of expanding the UT undergraduate to MD pathway program to students from other colleges. Meetings are underway with other colleges to explore this option.

  • A proposal has been submitted to the College of Graduate Studies for a Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Science/MS Law-Regulatory Compliance degree pipeline program.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of undergraduate-to-graduate pipeline programs


  • The College of Graduate Studies developed guidelines and procedures for the establishment of undergraduate-to-graduate pipeline programs that are congruent with Higher Learning Commission (HLC) accreditation guidelines and Ohio Department of Higher Education guidelines on credit hour limitations, registration and financial aid considerations. These guidelines were shared with graduate programs.

  • Two new undergraduate-to-graduate pipeline programs were established, including a BS in pharmacy-to-MA in law and a BA-to-MA in sociology. Two additional undergraduate-to-graduate pipeline programs are currently in development, and the College of Graduate Studies continues to review programs with potential to develop pipeline programs.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

May 2018

Outcome: Undergraduate participation rates in experiential learning


  • The Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services is in the process of developing a “Rocket Internship Guarantee” program that will be implemented in the fall of 2018 and includes student internships or other forms of experiential learning based on a student’s program of study and may include clinical rotation, field placements, internships, student teaching, research, study abroad, co-ops, service learning, performances and/or exhibitions.

October 2017

Outcome: Undergraduate participation rates in experiential learning


  • The Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services (CELCS) hired two new career consultants who will work with assigned colleges to strengthen existing, and develop new, internships and placement opportunities for students (December 2017).

  • The annual First Destination Survey was redesigned in spring of 2017 so that now students are able to indicate the specific kinds of experiential learning in which students are participating, which will assist CELCS in its efforts to assess its programs and services.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

November 2018

Outcome: Undergraduate participation rates in experiential learning


  • The Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services implemented the Career Services’ Ambassadors program, which trains student ambassadors to advise fellow students with a focus on preparation of resumes, cover letters, interview tips, job/internship searches and more.

  • During the early fall 2018 semester (August to October 2018), nine career ambassadors have conducted 253 student consultations. In addition, career ambassadors assist in outreach presentations and employment searches.

  • The Office of the Provost has established a Service Learning Advisory Committee to develop recommendations on the establishment of a service learning course designation process (SL course designation), with representation from the Office of the Provost, the Division of Student Affairs, the Office of University Engagement and Faculty Senate.

  • Last year, the Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services hired two new career consultants to work with assigned colleges to strengthen existing, and develop new, internships and placement opportunities for students.

  • To date, 22 percent of undergraduate students (3,546) have signed up for “Handshake,” an online, interactive database that assists students with searches related to internships and employment.

  • In response to the spring 2018 “First Destination Survey,” 83 percent of graduating seniors reported participating in some form of experiential learning during their studies at UT.

  • The Office of the President and the Office of the Provost appointed a “Service Learning (SL) Course Designation Advisory Committee” to recommend a plan for developing designated SL courses and increasing the service-learning courses that we provide our students, and indicating that a course is SL-designated on students’ transcripts.

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

May 2018

Outcome: Undergraduate student placement rate


  • The Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services hired two career consultants to work with assigned colleges to strengthen existing and develop new internships and placement opportunities for students.

October 2017

Outcome: Undergraduate student placement rate


  • See above (1.3.4), the Center for Experiential Learning and Career services has hired two new career consultants who will work with assigned colleges to strengthen existing, and develop new, internships and placement opportunities for students (December 2017).

I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Goal 3: PREPARE STUDENTS FOR ADVANCED ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CAREER SUCCESS.

November 2018

Outcome: Undergraduate student placement rate


  • Last year, the Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services hired two new career consultants to work with assigned colleges to strengthen existing, and develop new, internships and placement opportunities for students.

  • Career consultants have been assigned to specific colleges to increase collaboration.

  • An assistant director for career development was hired to provide leadership in the areas of identifying and establishing new internships and placement opportunities for students.

  • The UT College of Engineering’s Career Development Center marked a milestone with the hosting of the 20th annual Career Expo in the fall of 2018, celebrating 20 years of placing more than 20,000 engineering co-ops. More than 190 companies from across the U.S. and 700 UT engineering students and alumni attended the fall expo at UT. The College of Engineering hosts semiannual career expos to offer UT students the opportunity to network with potential employers.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 1: ACHIEVE NATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR RESEARCH EXCELLENCE.

May 2018

Outcome: Implement plan for two areas of excellence: biomedical and environmental sustainability research (spring 2018: implementation and investment plan, developed by the faculty, will be in place. 2022: implementation and investment plan will be 100% completed for its 5-year goal.)


  • Data has been collected regarding research funding and publications leading to the identification of biomedical science and environmental sustainability (energy and water).

  • Subcommittees were formed in the fall of 2017 and meetings took place throughout the 2017-18 academic year to provide direction and further refine the scope of the research areas identified.

October 2017

Outcome: Implement plan for two areas of excellence: biomedical and environmental sustainability research (spring 2018: implementation and investment plan, developed by the faculty, will be in place. 2022: implementation and investment plan will be 100% completed for its 5-year goal.)


  • Data collected regarding research funding and publications leading to the identification of biomedical science and environmental sustainability (energy and water).

  • Subcommittees have been formed and are meeting in the energy and water area to further define specific areas of strength and plan for submission of material to evaluate areas approved by the University Research Council.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 1: ACHIEVE NATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR RESEARCH EXCELLENCE.

November 2018

Outcome: Implement plan for two areas of excellence: biomedical and environmental sustainability research (spring 2018: implementation and investment plan, developed by the faculty, will be in place. 2022: implementation and investment plan will be 100% completed for its 5-year goal.)


  • Data has been collected regarding research funding and publications leading to the identification of biomedical science and environmental sustainability (energy and water).

  • Subcommittees were formed in fall 2017 and meetings took place throughout the 2017-18 academic year to provide direction and further refine the scope of the research areas identified.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 1: ACHIEVE NATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR RESEARCH EXCELLENCE.

May 2018

Outcome: Additional areas of excellence to be identified, in collaboration with faculty, with plans for implementation (spring 2018: additional areas of excellence developed by the faculty will be identified with master plans for implementation. 2022: implementation and investment plan will be 100% completed for its 5-year goal.)


  • Request for proposals for additional areas of research excellence was distributed to all faculty in the fall of 2017, and faculty submitted “letters of intent” requesting designation as areas of research excellence.

  • The Office of Research and the Research Council reviewed 31 letters of intent submitted by faculty groups for areas of research excellence and identified eight candidate areas for consideration. External reviews were completed for the eight top areas of research excellence submitted.

  • The selection of final areas of research excellence to be determined in consultation with the president and the provost.

  • The target is to identify at least five additional areas of research excellence by June of 2018.

October 2017

Outcome: Additional areas of excellence to be identified, in collaboration with faculty, with plans for implementation (spring 2018: additional areas of excellence developed by the faculty will be identified with master plans for implementation. 2022: implementation and investment plan will be 100% completed for its 5-year goal.)


  • Draft document to invite faculty to submit suggestions for additional areas of excellence has been approved by the University Research Council and also reviewed by the president and provost. The document is to be distributed university-wide in fall 2017, and follow-up meetings with faculty groups are under way to explain the process.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 1: ACHIEVE NATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR RESEARCH EXCELLENCE.

November 2018

Outcome: Additional areas of excellence to be identified, in collaboration with faculty, with plans for implementation (spring 2018: additional areas of excellence developed by the faculty will be identified with master plans for implementation. 2022: implementation and investment plan will be 100% completed for its 5-year goal.)


  • Three additional areas of research excellence were identified following a review of faculty proposals by the University Research Council and external reviewers.

  • The three research areas include astronomy and astrophysics; solar, energy, water quality and sustainable technologies; and cell architecture and dynamics.

  • In addition, “spotlight” areas of unique research distinction also were identified, as well as emerging areas of research excellence and areas of future opportunities.

  • The “spotlight” areas of unique distinction include research in human trafficking, disability and society, and hypertension and precision medicine.

  • The areas of emerging research excellence identified include legacy cities; and cancer, immune therapy, and precision molecular therapy.

  • The areas of future opportunity include vector biology, smart transportation, data 2 decision, BioPsychoSocial determinants of chronic disease, and community-based STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics).

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

May 2018

Outcome: UT's national ranking in research expenditures


  • National Science Foundation report on national rankings in research expenditures not yet available.

  • UT increased external research funding by 20% compared to the same period last year, with $46.7 million in research funding awarded to UT in FY18, compared to $38.6 million in FY17.

October 2017

Outcome: UT's national ranking in research expenditures


  • National Science Foundation report on research expenditures not yet released. However, sponsored awards for FY17 increased by small amount, with first increase reported in last five years. Increases recorded in Q1 FY18 compared to Q1 FY17 show us on track for achieving year-end goals.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

November 2018

Outcome: UT's national ranking in research expenditures


  • UT is ranked No. 194 nationally by the National Science Foundation for research and development expenditures in fiscal year 2017.

  • The National Science Foundation report on fiscal year 2018 research expenditures has not yet been released.

  • The UT Strategic Plan, Path to Excellence, includes in Goal 2 under Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities, that UT will increase its national ranking in research expenditures from 190 to 160, and its ranking among Ohio’s public universities from 6th in the state to 3rd. The ranking of 190 that was recorded in the Strategic Plan was the most recent ranking available from the NSF at the time the Plan was submitted to the Board of Trustees in Spring, 2016. That year reported by the NSF was 2015. The NSF generally reports the numbers in late fall of each year, and there is a lag of over a year before numbers are reported. Since the Strategic Plan was submitted, the NSF reported its 2016 ranking in November, 2017 where UT stood at #197 and most recently in November, 2018 its rankings of universities for 2017 where UT stood at #194. Since UT’s awards grew by over 20% in FY18, we expect that UT’s ranking to be reported in fall, 2019 to move even more positively toward the 160 target.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

May 2018

Outcome: UT's ranking in research and development expenditures among Ohio public research universities


  • National Science Foundation report on Ohio’s ranking in research expenditures not yet available.

October 2017

Outcome: UT's ranking in research and development expenditures among Ohio public research universities


  • National Science Foundation report on research expenditures not yet released. However, sponsored awards for FY17 increased by small amount, with first increase reported in last five years. Increases recorded in Q1 FY18 compared to Q1 FY17 show us on track for achieving year-end goals.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

November 2018

Outcome: UT's ranking in research and development expenditures among Ohio public research universities


  • UT ranks sixth among Ohio public universities for fiscal year 2017, according to National Science Foundation rankings of research and development expenditures.

  • The National Science Foundation report on fiscal year 2018 research expenditures among Ohio public research universities has not yet been released.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of faculty publications in high-impact and high-profile journals, with program faculty identifying those journals relating to their disciplines


  • UT increased the number of faculty publications in high-impact and high-profile journals by 12.4% (from 2,920 fromin 2014-2016 to 3,283 fromin 2015-2017).

  • Citations for faculty publications increased by 31.4% (from 9,487 fromin 2014-2016 to 12,474 fromin 2015-2017).

  • UT ranks third in Ohio from 2015-2017 in relation to impact factor (H-Index) of faculty publications, with an increase of 29% from an H-Index of 31 from 2014-2016 to an H-Index of 40 from 2015-2017.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of faculty publications in high-impact and high-profile journals, with program faculty identifying those journals relating to their disciplines


  • Dean of libraries, working with library faculty and staff, have identified high-profile journals for each of the colleges, to be reviewed by department chairs and deans of each college.

  • Faculty activity reporting software (Faculty 180) was launched in fall 2017 and will be expanded for all candidates for tenure and/or promotion and all pre-tenure faculty beginning in fall 2018.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of faculty publications in high-impact and high-profile journals, with program faculty identifying those journals relating to their disciplines


  • The number of faculty publications and citations increased by 12 percent from 2014-16 to 2015-17, and UT faculty ranked third in Ohio in relation to the h-index (impact factor) for publications from 2015-17.

  • Note that a baseline was established for this outcome based on 2014-16 data, which identifies 2,920 total journal publications, 9,487 citations and an h-index (impact factor) of 31. The 2022 target was established as a 17 percent increase in all three categories.

  • (Note: databases searched and report prepared by the Dean’s Office, UT Libraries, “UT Research Productivity and Impact Study, 2018.”)

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of faculty who are fellows of selected national societies, hold leadership positions in national organizations, or serve on national grant-review panels or study groups


  • During the current academic year (2017-18), three UT faculty members were selected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of faculty who are fellows of selected national societies, hold leadership positions in national organizations, or serve on national grant-review panels or study groups


  • Faculty will be invited in spring 2018 to enter information on Faculty 180 to determine number of faculty who are fellows and leaders in national organizations, grant-review panels or study groups. Other survey methods to secure this information are being reviewed by the provost and the Council of Deans.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of faculty who are fellows of selected national societies, hold leadership positions in national organizations, or serve on national grant-review panels or study groups


  • A baseline was established for 2016-17, with 174 (or 21 percent) of tenure-track faculty selected in 2016-17 as Fellows of national societies, receiving national, named fellowships, Fulbright or other prestigious appointments, or national or international awards and honors; holding leadership positions in national organizations; or serving on national grant-review panels or study groups.

  • (Note: data collected from departmental and college annual reports for the 2016-17 academic year; report prepared by the Office of the Provost, 2018.)

  • During the 2017-18 academic year, three UT faculty members were selected as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement in Science.

  • In the fall of 2018, Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, interim dean of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, was named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society; and Dr. Paul Erhardt, Distinguished University Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, was inducted into the American Chemical Society Medicinal Chemistry Division Hall of Fame.

  • Enjie Hall, UT director of campus accessibility and student disability services, was appointed to serve on the Board of Directors of the national Association of Higher Education and Disability.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of faculty and staff participating in local research and community engagement activities


  • The University established the new position of director of strategic initiatives in the fall of 2017 to track and promote university-community engagement, and efforts are ongoing to collect and communicate this information as a resource to campus and community constituents.

  • The University established an Office of Workforce Development to collaborate with business and industry to contribute to workforce and economic development in the region. An Advisory Task Force on Workforce Development also was established and a survey was distributed to all UT faculty and staff to identify current and planned workforce activities. Survey respondents reported approximately 29 workforce development activities currently underway at UT, including partnerships with the East Toledo Family Center, Lucas County Jobs and Family Services, Toledo Museum of Art, The Toledo Repertoire Theatre, Toledo Public Schools, Jeep, Dana Corporation, First Solar and many other for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the region.

  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs is working with the Office of Government Relations to survey faculty involvement in community projects.

  • A new leadership appointment was made for the Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center with the goal of increasing the University’s profile in relation to engagement with the community and region.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of faculty and staff participating in local research and community engagement activities


  • The University has created a new Office of Workforce Development and established a Task Force on Workforce Development and an Advisory Board. A survey of workforce development initiatives currently underway, or planned, at UT will be administered in November 2017 to all faculty and administrators on both campuses to assist with assessment and planning.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 2: INCREASE THE NATIONAL PROMINENCE OF FACULTY DERIVED FROM THEIR RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS ACTIVITIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of faculty and staff participating in local research and community engagement activities


  • The Chancellor’s Award (Ohio Department of Higher Education) was awarded to Dr. Tom Bridgeman, director of the UT Lake Erie Center, in recognition of his leadership and expertise in the Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative for the Ohio Department of Higher Education. The Chancellor’s Award recognizes exemplary faculty, administration and students who have gone above and beyond the call of duty in using the power of higher education to impact the communities where they are located and for the greater good of Ohio.

  • In fall 2018, UT’s Department of Pediatrics’ literacy program celebrated 20 years with the goal of collecting 20,000 children’s books. The “Reach Out and Read” program has provided more than 258,000 books to children across the region during the last 20 years.

  • The University established the new position of director of strategic initiatives in the fall of 2017 to track and promote university-community engagement. Efforts are ongoing to collect and communicate this information as a resource to campus and community constituents.

  • The Office of Research is working with the Office of Government Relations to survey faculty involvement in community projects.

  • A new leadership appointment was made for the Jack Ford Urban Affairs Center with the goal of increasing the University’s profile in relation to engagement with the community and region.

  • The Office of the Provost established a baseline for 2016-17 with 48 percent of faculty participating in one or more community engagement activities. Note that there is no overall database of community engagement activity of faculty and staff at this time. The only source of aggregate data is Faculty 180, the online database for faculty activity reporting, which is currently limited to information on faculty who applied for tenure and/or promotion during the 2017-18 academic year, and a review of their dossiers related to listing of community service (a total of 58 faculty dossiers reviewed). Once all tenure-track faculty enter their information into the Faculty 180 system, more comprehensive data will become available.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 3: REINVENT AND REINVEST IN RESEARCH PROCESSES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY.

May 2018

Outcome: Carnegie Classification for UT's research activity and graduate programs


  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs is working with the University’s Division of Technology to evaluate RFPs/proposals for the implementation of a new comprehensive electronic research administration system to enhance the productivity of faculty researchers (pre-award and post-award technology).

  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs hired new staff to support the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and the Institutional Review Board.

  • Planning is underway to hire new staff to support post-award function and compliance (including external control).

October 2017

Outcome: Carnegie Classification for UT's research activity and graduate programs


  • Office of Research and Sponsored Programs team working on RFP for a complete and robust research systems suite of tools to enhance the productivity of faculty researchers.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 3: REINVENT AND REINVEST IN RESEARCH PROCESSES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY.

November 2018

Outcome: Carnegie Classification for UT's research activity and graduate programs


  • During the 2017-18 academic year, external research awards increased by 21 percent compared to the previous year, with 326 external research awards and approximately $46.7 million in external funding. In addition, new awards increased by 40 percent from $19 million to $27 million.

  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Program is in the process of implementing plans for five identified areas of research excellence at UT.

  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs is investing in research support structure (see below) to enhance the productivity of faculty researchers.

  • With the support of University Libraries and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, in May 2018, the UT president and provost recognized 26 faculty across the University who were selected for their outstanding contributions in scholarly and creative activity during the past three years.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 3: REINVENT AND REINVEST IN RESEARCH PROCESSES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY.

May 2018

Outcome: Investment in research support infrastructure


  • The Department of Internal Audit and Compliance completed an assessment of the University’s research support infrastructure that is currently being reviewed by the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

October 2017

Outcome: Investment in research support infrastructure


  • The Department of Internal Audit and Compliance is conducting a research support infrastructure assessment. Its report will be completed by December 2017. The report will then be reviewed by Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Information Technology and Grants Accounting department. The information necessary to determine the baseline will be available in spring 2018.

II. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

Goal 3: REINVENT AND REINVEST IN RESEARCH PROCESSES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY.

November 2018

Outcome: Investment in research support infrastructure


  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs worked with the Office of Information Technology to evaluate RFPs/proposals for the implementation of a new, comprehensive, electronic research administration system to enhance the productivity of faculty researchers (pre-award and post-award technology).

  • Three vendor finalists were invited to campus, and the committee made a recommendation in May 2018.

  • Final recommendations were that one system (IRB Manager) was to be selected to support compliance programs (for Institutional Review Board research protocols) and another system (InfoEd) was recommended to provide grant development and grant accounting support.

  • Funds were identified to purchase IRB Manager and, beginning in October 2018, all new IRB (Institutional Review Board) protocols are now submitted through the IRB Manager software system. Legacy data has to be entered in the new system, but renewals and amendments are also to be entered into the new system.

  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs is working with the Office of Information Technology to explore ways to implement InfoEd in spring 2019.

  • Planning is moving forward to hire new staff to support post-award function and compliance (including external control).

  • There is a need for additional grant writers dedicated to specific colleges to improve grant award success. However, due to lack of funding, this hiring plan was not implemented. Instead of moving forward with this plan, the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs hired an additional part-time grant writer to assist the current grant writer.

  • The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs is working on a plan to create a new office of “proposal development” to assist faculty with research grant proposals.

  • An additional staff member was hired to oversee export control issues.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 1: FOSTER A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE BY SUPPORTING RETENTION, CAREER PROGRESSION AND HIGH JOB SATISFACTION FOR STAFF.

May 2018

Outcome: Retention rate of non-faculty staff


  • The retention rate of non-faculty staff for the first quarter of 2018 is on track to meet the target goal for staff retention.

October 2017

Outcome: Retention rate of non-faculty staff


  • For 2017, the year-to-date retention rate of non-faculty staff is 86.8% (partial year calculation from Jan. 1-Oct. 31, 2017).

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 1: FOSTER A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE BY SUPPORTING RETENTION, CAREER PROGRESSION AND HIGH JOB SATISFACTION FOR STAFF.

November 2018

Outcome: Retention rate of non-faculty staff


  • The retention rate of non-faculty staff for the second quarter of 2018 (April 1 - June 30, 2018) is 93.7 percent, well above the 2022 target of 83 percent.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 2: FOSTER A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE BY SUPPORTING RETENTION, PROMOTION AND HIGH JOB SATISFACTION FOR FACULTY.

May 2018

Outcome: Percent of full professors in the pool of full-time faculty


  • Sixteen (16) faculty participated in the inaugural 2017-18 Associate-to-Professor (ATP) program, developed to guide and mentor faculty to full professor, with leadership from the Office of the Provost. The second cohort of faculty will be recruited for 2018-19.

  • Twenty-six (26) faculty were promoted to full professor for fall 2018 - compared to an average of 16 faculty who were promoted to full professor per year during the last three years.

  • University-level tenure and promotion guidelines were developed during the 2017-18 academic year and vetted by deans, department chairs and faculty, then endorsed by the Faculty Senate in April 2018. College and departmental tenure and promotion elaborations will be aligned with the University-level guidelines.

October 2017

Outcome: Percent of full professors in the pool of full-time faculty


  • Developed and implemented Associate to Full Professor (ATF) program to guide and mentor faculty, with 16 faculty participating in inaugural group in fall 2017 with leadership from the Office of the Provost.

  • Draft of university-level tenure and promotion guidelines has been developed in fall of 2017 and is under review by the Faculty Senate

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 2: FOSTER A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE BY SUPPORTING RETENTION, PROMOTION AND HIGH JOB SATISFACTION FOR FACULTY.

November 2018

Outcome: Percent of full professors in the pool of full-time faculty


  • Sixteen (16) faculty participated in the inaugural 2017-18 Associate-to-Professor (ATP) program, developed to guide and mentor faculty to full professor with leadership from the Office of the Provost.

  • Six (6) faculty who participated in the 2017-18 ATP program submitted dossiers for full professor in September 2018 (38 percent of 2017-18 ATP cohort submitted dossiers).

  • Seventeen (17) faculty were selected to participate in the 2018-19 ATP program, including nine faculty who had participated in the 2017-18 ATP program and made significant progress.

  • Twenty-six (26) associate professors were promoted to full professor for fall 2018 - compared to an average of 16 faculty who were promoted to full professor per year during the last three years.

  • During the 2018-19 academic year, the Office of the Provost launched a new mentoring program for new tenure-track faculty, with plans underway to develop mentoring programs for all tenure-track faculty. College mentoring plans are being developed and will include mentoring programs for associate professors.

  • University-level tenure and promotion guidelines were developed during the 2017-18 academic year and vetted by deans, department chairs and faculty, and endorsed by the Faculty Senate in April 2018. During the 2018-19 academic year, colleges and departments are working to align their college-level and department-level tenure and promotion elaborations with the University-level guidelines.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 2: FOSTER A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE BY SUPPORTING RETENTION, PROMOTION AND HIGH JOB SATISFACTION FOR FACULTY.

May 2018

Outcome: Rate of tenure-track assistant professors achieving tenure and promotion in seven years


  • Thirteen (13) assistant professors were approved for tenure and promotion to associate professor for fall 2018.

  • Two (2) associate professors were approved for tenure in the College of Law for fall 2018.

  • Two (2) faculty were promoted to associate professor in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences for fall 2018.

  • A faculty mentoring program has been developed and will be implemented in the fall of 2018 for all new, tenure-track faculty.

  • University-level tenure and promotion guidelines were developed during the 2017-18 academic year and vetted by deans, department chairs and faculty, then endorsed by the Faculty Senate in April of 2018. College and departmental tenure and promotion elaborations will be aligned with the University-level guidelines.

October 2017

Outcome: Rate of tenure-track assistant professors achieving tenure and promotion in seven years


  • Draft of university-level tenure and promotion guidelines has been developed in fall 2017.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 2: FOSTER A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE BY SUPPORTING RETENTION, PROMOTION AND HIGH JOB SATISFACTION FOR FACULTY.

November 2018

Outcome: Rate of tenure-track assistant professors achieving tenure and promotion in seven years


  • Fifteen (15) tenure-track assistant professors were tenured and promoted to associate professor for fall 2018 (compared to 13 assistant professors in fall 2017).

  • Eleven (11) assistant professors were promoted to associate professor for fall 2018 in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences and the Judith Herb College of Education.

  • Two (2) faculty received tenure for fall 2018 in the College of Law.

  • Eighty-eight (88) faculty renewals were approved (first-, second-, third-, fourth- and fifth-year progress toward tenure and promotion to associate professor), with a 100 percent approval rate.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 2: FOSTER A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE BY SUPPORTING RETENTION, PROMOTION AND HIGH JOB SATISFACTION FOR FACULTY.

May 2018

Outcome: Average time spent as associate professor before progressing to full professor rank.


  • Developed and implemented Associate to Full Professor (ATP) program to guide and mentor faculty, with 16 faculty participating in inaugural group in fall 2017 with leadership from the Office of the Provost.

  • A faculty mentoring program has been developed and will be implemented in the fall of 2018 for all new, tenure-track faculty.

  • University-level tenure and promotion guidelines were developed during the 2017-18 academic year and vetted by deans, department chairs and faculty, then endorsed by the Faculty Senate in April of 2018. College and departmental tenure and promotion elaborations will be aligned with the University-level guidelines.

October 2017

Outcome: Average time spent as associate professor before progressing to full professor rank.


  • The newly established Associate to Full Professor (ATF) program was launched in fall 2017 to provide mentoring and guidance to faculty interested and ready for progression to rank of full professor.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 2: FOSTER A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE BY SUPPORTING RETENTION, PROMOTION AND HIGH JOB SATISFACTION FOR FACULTY.

November 2018

Outcome: Average time spent as associate professor before progressing to full professor rank.


  • The average time at associate professor rank for faculty promoted to full professor for fall 2018 was 6.34 years (note that baseline 2016 is 7.1 years and 2022 target goal is 6.8 years).

  • The new Associate-to-Professor (ATP) program in the Office of the Provost implemented in fall 2017 and the newly implemented faculty mentoring program in 2018-19 are initiatives designed to decrease the average time spent as associate professor before progressing to full professor rank.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 3: INCREASE DIVERSITY AMONG ALL EMPLOYEES.

May 2018

Outcome: Academic and administrative units having approved diversity hiring plans


  • The Human Resources department and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion have completed an inventory of the number of academic and administrative units that have a diversity hiring plan and/or inclusion officers.

  • All academic units and three administrative units (Libraries, Athletics and Student Affairs) have created diversity committees and appointed inclusion officers.

  • The next phase includes developing diversity hiring plans in academic and administrative units.

  • A draft of a diversity hiring plan has been developed for the Division of Academic Affairs and is under review by the Office of the Provost.

  • A template for diversity hiring plans for academic units is being developed by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion in collaboration with the Office of the Provost.

  • A new director of affirmative action and equal opportunity/compliance for the University has been hired with a start date of April 30, 2018.

October 2017

Outcome: Academic and administrative units having approved diversity hiring plans


  • All academic units now have an inclusion officer.

  • Three administrative units (libraries, athletics, student affairs) have created diversity committees and inclusion officers.

  • The next phase includes developing diversity hiring plans.

  • The Human Resources (HR) department and Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) are conducting an inventory of the number of administrative units with diversity hiring plans and the number of academic units with diversity plans that include diversity hiring plans.

  • Once the baseline set of diversity hiring plans is established, HR and ODI will work together to establish a diversity hiring plan approval process, along with an implementation strategy.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 3: INCREASE DIVERSITY AMONG ALL EMPLOYEES.

November 2018

Outcome: Academic and administrative units having approved diversity hiring plans


  • The Office of Human Resources and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion continue to work to ensure that academic and administrative units are on track to meet the 2022 target of 100 percent approved diversity hiring plans.

  • Under the direction of the vice president for diversity and inclusion, a template for diversity hiring plans is currently in progress.

  • A draft diversity hiring plan has been developed for the Division of Academic Affairs and is under review by the Office of the Provost.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 3: INCREASE DIVERSITY AMONG ALL EMPLOYEES.

May 2018

Outcome: Percentage of employees participating in annual diversity training


  • UT employees participate in diversity training programs through face-to-face sessions provided by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, online training and new employee orientation.

  • The Human Resources department and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion are moving the online training platform from the Safety Test Bank to Law Room for the online diversity training courses.

  • From December 2017 to May 2018, 160 faculty and staff received diversity training.

  • The Human Resources department and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion continue to update the University’s diversity policies, determine which employees are required to complete annual diversity training and develop a process to identify when employees have completed their training.

  • A face-to-face (as opposed to online) diversity training workshop was created and launched in fall 2017. In spring 2018, 30 faculty and staff participated in a 15-hour “Train the Trainer” course and now conduct training sessions on a volunteer basis for faculty, staff and students.

  • The Office of Diversity and Inclusion conducted 17 new employee orientations between August 2017 and September 2017, with 650 employees receiving diversity training.

  • Two new university committees have been created, including the University Council on Diversity and Inclusion and the Council of Inclusion Officers; they serve in an advisory capacity to the vice president for diversity and inclusion.

  • “Dialogues on Diversity” sessions were launched in the fall of 2017.

  • A Diversity Calendar was created online for the University-wide community.

October 2017

Outcome: Percentage of employees participating in annual diversity training


  • UT employees participate in diversity training programs through face-to-face sessions provided by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, as well as online training and new employee orientation.

  • The Human Resources (HR) department and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) are moving the online training platform from the Safety Test Bank to LawRoom for the online diversity training courses.

  • From September 2017 to November 2017, 125 current faculty and staff have received diversity training.

  • HR and ODI are in the process of defining and updating policy in this area, determining which employee groups are required to complete annual diversity training (which may differ at UTMC), and identifying a process that will correctly capture which employees have completed training.

  • A face-to-face (as opposed to online) diversity training workshop was created and launched in fall 2017. In June 2017, 30 faculty and staff participated in a 15-hour “Train the Trainer” course, and now conduct training sessions on a volunteer basis for faculty, staff and students.

  • The ODI conducted 12 new employee orientations between May and September 2017, with 550 new employees receiving diversity training.

  • Two new university committees have been created, including the University Council on Diversity and Inclusion and the Council of Inclusion Officers; they serve in an advisory capacity to the vice president for diversity and inclusion.

  • “Dialogues on Diversity” sessions launched in fall 2017.

  • Diversity calendar created online for university-wide community.

  • Second diversity survey launched in spring 2017.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 3: INCREASE DIVERSITY AMONG ALL EMPLOYEES.

November 2018

Outcome: Percentage of employees participating in annual diversity training


  • UT employees participate in diversity training programs through face-to-face sessions provided by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, as well as online training and new employee orientation.

  • For fiscal year 2017, 649 new employees received diversity training during new employee orientation.

  • For the first half of 2018 (most recent data available), 409 new employees received diversity training during new employee orientation.

  • The Office of Human Resources and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion continue to update the University’s diversity policies, determine which employees are required to complete annual diversity training and develop a process to identify when employees have completed their training.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 4: STRENGTHEN EMPLOYEE WORK-LIFE BALANCE, SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND PRIDE IN WORK.

May 2018

Outcome: Overall work satisfaction average from a nationally normed campus assessment instrument


  • In spring 2018, UT employees participated in The Chronicle of Higher Education’s “Great Colleges to Work For” 2018 survey, which closed in April. Baseline and target metrics will be determined when the survey results are released.

October 2017

Outcome: Overall work satisfaction average from a nationally normed campus assessment instrument


  • A review of campus assessment instruments is under way with the goal of conducting a campus survey in spring 2018.

  • The Campus Climate Survey also is scheduled to be administered in spring 2018.

  • A new staff leadership development program was launched in fall 2017, with approximately 22 staff members participating in the inaugural class, beginning in October 2017.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 4: STRENGTHEN EMPLOYEE WORK-LIFE BALANCE, SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND PRIDE IN WORK.

November 2018

Outcome: Overall work satisfaction average from a nationally normed campus assessment instrument


  • In spring 2018, UT employees participated in The Chronicle of Higher Education’s “Great Colleges to Work For” 2018 survey, which closed in early April.

  • Baseline and target metrics were established in fall 2018 based on survey results, with a baseline of 70 percent overall work satisfaction and a 2022 target of 75 percent overall work satisfaction (based on Carnegie research average).

  • In the fall of 2016, the UT president and provost launched The University of Toledo Leadership Institute (UTLI) to provide leadership development for UT faculty, with 21 faculty from departments and colleges across the University participating in the inaugural Leadership Institute. Twenty-one faculty participated in the second year’s cohort in 2017-18, and a third cohort of 21 faculty members was selected to participate in this year’s UTLI.

  • Three UT faculty were selected to participate in the second year of the Mid-American Conference (MAC) Academic Leadership Development program.

  • The Office of the Provost expanded the Provost’s Faculty Fellows program this year, with eight faculty selected to work on projects related to enhancing student success.

  • A new faculty mentoring program was launched in fall 2018 with departmental “launch” committees established for all newly hired tenure-track faculty to provide a supportive environment. Mentoring programs will be established within each of the colleges for all tenure-track faculty during the next year.

  • This fall, the Office of the Provost established a series of workshops for new and existing department chairs to provide professional development opportunities related to departmental leadership and to share best practices.

  • This fall, the Office of the Provost implemented a new series of monthly faculty forums on topics related to the future of higher education. The “Future of Higher Education Forums” are held monthly, and faculty and staff across the University are invited to attend and also serve as presenters. The September 2018 forum focused on crisis training to assist students, and the Office of the Provost partnered with the Division of Student Affairs to offer this program; the October forum focused on best practices in online and blended learning; and the November forum focused on measuring and communicating faculty members’ research impact. The December workshop will focus on developing one’s emotional intelligence. All of the monthly forums are live-streamed and archived for future viewing opportunities.

  • This fall, the Office of the Provost established a series of workshops for academic deans on key issues related to decanal leadership and to share best practices.

  • In October 2018, the Office of the Provost partnered with the UT Police Department to offer de-escalation training to faculty and staff.

  • UT President Dr. Sharon L. Gaber continues to host her “Breakfast with the President” series for faculty and staff during the fall 2018 semester. These informal sessions provide faculty and staff the opportunity to receive University updates directly from the president, and also afford the president the opportunity to gain employee input and exchange ideas among participants to help improve the University.

  • In the fall of 2018, the Office of the Provost launched monthly “Faculty and Staff Social” events (on the last Friday of the month) to provide an opportunity for faculty and staff across the University to gather in an informal, casual setting to relax and meet with colleagues – both old and new. Faculty and staff socials will continue to be held monthly during spring 2019 semester.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 5: ENGAGE ALUMNI, FRIENDS AND STAKEHOLDERS MEANINGFULLY IN THE LIFE OF THE UNIVERSITY.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of alumni and friends involved annually in academic programs and co-curricular activities


  • The Office of the Provost is working with the Council of Deans to review current levels of college and department engagement with alumni and friends of the University and to identify opportunities for alumni, friends and stakeholders of the University to engage meaningfully in academic programs or other activities of the University, including student mentoring and internship development.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of alumni and friends involved annually in academic programs and co-curricular activities


  • The Office of the Provost has established a working group of provost’s office staff and deans to identify opportunities for alumni, friends and stakeholders of the colleges to engage in academic programs or other activities of the University.

  • Recommendations will be submitted to the provost in February 2018.

III. FACULTY, STAFF AND ALUMNI

Goal 5: ENGAGE ALUMNI, FRIENDS AND STAKEHOLDERS MEANINGFULLY IN THE LIFE OF THE UNIVERSITY.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of alumni and friends involved annually in academic programs and co-curricular activities


  • The Office of the Provost is working with the deans to review current levels of engagement of alumni and friends who serve on college and departmental advisory boards, and to identify opportunities for alumni, friends and stakeholders of the University to engage meaningfully in academic programs or other activities of the University.

  • A baseline was established in fall 2018 with approximately 650 alumni/friends of the University serving on college and department advisory boards, and a target goal was established to increase the number by 10 percent by 2022. (Note that data was obtained from annual department and college reports and by direct reports by deans. Baseline and target goals may be further refined according to faculty 180 entries as this information becomes available.)

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 1: BUILD A STRONG FINANCIAL FOUNDATION.

May 2018

Outcome: Capital funding increase in the annual operating budget


  • For the combined UT and UTMC budgets, the percentage increase from FY17 to FY18 in capital funding from the annual operating budget is 37% ($5,500,000 to $7,059,507).

  • The FY19 operating budget will include a 2% increase in capital funding.

October 2017

Outcome: Capital funding increase in the annual operating budget


  • For the combined UT and UTMC budgets, the percentage increase from FY17 to FY18 in capital funding from the annual operating budget is 37% ($5,500,000 to $7,059,507).

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 1: BUILD A STRONG FINANCIAL FOUNDATION.

November 2018

Outcome: Capital funding increase in the annual operating budget


  • The FY19 operating budget includes a 2 percent increase in capital funding.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 1: BUILD A STRONG FINANCIAL FOUNDATION.

May 2018

Outcome: Net income margin and investment capital of UTMC


  • UTMC will expand service lines, while continuing to focus on key service areas.

  • UTMC is committed to expanding its behavioral health services, most recently through the opening of an inpatient detox unit; and will continue to evaluate key service lines – including primary care, orthopaedics, heart and vascular, oncology, stroke, and trauma.

October 2017

Outcome: Net income margin and investment capital of UTMC


  • Expanding service lines, while continuing to focus on key service areas.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 1: BUILD A STRONG FINANCIAL FOUNDATION.

November 2018

Outcome: Net income margin and investment capital of UTMC


  • The University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC) has identified several areas of focus - including primary care, behavioral health, consultative services and orthopaedics - and is committed to expanding its behavioral health services (most recently through the opening of the inpatient detoxification unit) and will continue to evaluate key service lines, including primary care, orthopaedics, heart and vascular, oncology, stroke and trauma.

  • For UTMC to invest in capital and adapt services to meet the needs of the community, UTMC will evaluate initiatives to remove significant indirect costs from the health system and continue to reduce overhead to allow for capital generation that advances the medical center’s clinical mission.

  • Revenue growth opportunities include the expansion of primary care/family practice with the buildout of the Glendale Medical East building, the expansion of the adult inpatient detoxification unit to be completed by April 2018, and an assessment of the feasibility of developing an inpatient, long-term, acute-care hospital program.

  • Additional revenue growth opportunities include the growth of the medical oncology program through faculty recruitment and the implementation of multiple, clinical research trials, which is ongoing. A market assessment also is underway related to the feasibility of developing adolescent substance-abuse services and adult, inpatient psychiatric services.

  • Following a feasibility study, UTMC has successfully launched a bariatric surgery program.

  • UTMC continues to consolidate ambulatory care (ongoing).

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 1: BUILD A STRONG FINANCIAL FOUNDATION.

May 2018

Outcome: Colleges meeting their agreed-upon contribution goals


  • The Office of Finance and Administration continues to provide support for this outcome by providing data, developing agreed-upon metrics and updating the deans’ dashboards.

  • College deans are able to access contribution margin data from FY13 through FY17 and are reviewing and analyzing the data to determine their agreed upon contribution goals.

October 2017

Outcome: Colleges meeting their agreed-upon contribution goals


  • The Office of Finance and Administration is providing support for this outcome by developing agreed-upon metrics and updating the deans’ dashboards. The FY17 contribution margins were recently completed and are available for review on the deans’ dashboards

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 1: BUILD A STRONG FINANCIAL FOUNDATION.

November 2018

Outcome: Colleges meeting their agreed-upon contribution goals


  • The Office of the Provost is working with college deans to meet their agreed-upon contribution goals.

  • The Office of Finance and Administration continues to provide support for this outcome by providing data, developing agreed-upon metrics and updating the deans’ dashboards.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 1: BUILD A STRONG FINANCIAL FOUNDATION.

May 2018

Outcome: Key leverage ratios, as measured by annual Moody's ratios


  • For FY18, the financial leverage ratio is Aa and the debt affordability ratio is A, both in line with the 2022 target.

  • Moody’s and S&P have reaffirmed UT’s credit rating.

October 2017

Outcome: Key leverage ratios, as measured by annual Moody's ratios


  • For FY17, the key leverage ratios would yield an Aa rating.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 1: BUILD A STRONG FINANCIAL FOUNDATION.

November 2018

Outcome: Key leverage ratios, as measured by annual Moody's ratios


  • For FY17, the Financial Leverage Ratio is Aa and the Debt Affordability Ratio is A, both in line with the 2022 target. (Note that the 2018 ratios are not available until 2019.)

  • Overall, for 2017, Moody’s has assigned The University of Toledo a rating of A1 with a stable outlook.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 2: ENSURE ADAPTABILITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND FISCAL HEALTH FOR ACADEMIC PROGRAMS.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of programs meeting their instructional efficiency goals (student-to-faculty ratios, cost per credit hour, number of organized class sections per faculty FTE) based on national peer data


  • Colleges and academic departments were provided with baseline data to include in their annual reporting process, beginning in the spring of 2018.

  • Colleges are currently working with the Office of the Provost to assess the baseline data and determine their goals in alignment with the University’s strategic plan.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of programs meeting their instructional efficiency goals (student-to-faculty ratios, cost per credit hour, number of organized class sections per faculty FTE) based on national peer data


  • The Office of the Provost has established a Committee on Institutional Planning and Effectiveness (CIEP) to collect, analyze, monitor and track data in order to make data-driven decisions and align resource allocation with institutional priorities.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 2: ENSURE ADAPTABILITY, SUSTAINABILITY AND FISCAL HEALTH FOR ACADEMIC PROGRAMS.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of programs meeting their instructional efficiency goals (student-to-faculty ratios, cost per credit hour, number of organized class sections per faculty FTE) based on national peer data


  • The Committee on Institutional Effectiveness and Planning (CIEP) in the Office of the Provost has established a baseline of 62.8 percent of academic programs meeting their instructional efficiency goals for the 2016-17 academic year, based on national peer data; and a target goal was established for 80 percent of academic programs to meet their instructional efficiency goals by 2022.

  • CIEP reports that 69.8 percent of academic programs met their instructional efficiency goals during the 2017-18 academic year, based on national peer data; this is an increase of 7 percent from the previous year.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Total UT enrollment


  • Overall enrollment for fall 2017 was down 0.3%, primarily because new student enrollment was lower than expected at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  • The interim vice president for enrollment management is in the process of analyzing the factors that contributed to a lower-than-expected yield among admitted undergraduate students.

  • Stronger student retention increases for the spring semester of 2018 increased spring enrollment; with an improved undergraduate fall-to-spring semester retention rate of 90.6% for the 2017-18 academic year compared to 89.3% for 2016-17 and 89.1% for the 2015-16 academic year.

  • Plans to increase enrollment going forward include implementation of the strategic enrollment plan and an increase in personalization and customization of recruitment from Direct from High School (DHS) students; enhanced messaging to school counselors and parents; enhanced marketing to targeted geographic areas; timely notification of graduate funding offers; and timely and effective financial aid awards.

  • New email campaigns have been rolled out for all undergraduate student populations.

  • Enhancements have been made to the campus visit program and initial feedback from the first round of campus visits by students and their families has been positive.

  • Fall 2018 confirmations for Direct from High School (DHS) admitted students are up compared to last year.

  • International students admitted for fall 2018 are up 25% over the same time last year.

  • Piloted the offering of winter intersession courses offered in 2017-18 and reviewing results to improve and increase the number of courses offered next year.

  • Summer session courses to be expanded to increase student enrollment in the summer of 2018.

  • College Credit Plus enrollment has increased for summer 2018 courses.

  • Initiatives are underway to enhance and expand existing and new transfer pathways, including implementation of the state of Ohio’s Transfer Assurance Guides (TAGs), 2+2 programs, UT’s Rocket Express partnership with Owens Community College, as well as collaborations with other community colleges in the region.

October 2017

Outcome: Total UT enrollment


  • Overall enrollment for fall 2017 was down 0.3%, primarily because new student enrollment was lower than expected at the graduate and undergraduate levels.

  • The interim vice president for enrollment management is in the process of analyzing the factors that contributed to a lower-than-expected yield among admitted undergraduate students.

  • Plans to increase enrollment going forward include implementation of the strategic enrollment plan and an increase in personalization and customization of recruitment of Direct from High School (DHS) students; enhanced messaging to school counselors and parents; enhanced marketing to targeted geographic areas; timely notification of graduate funding offers; and timely and effective financial aid awards.

  • Initiatives underway to enhance and expand existing and new transfer pathways, including TAGS, 2+2 programs and Rocket Express with Owens Community College, as well as other regional community colleges.

  • The interim president of Owens Community College met with advisers, success coaches and academic leaders in fall 2017 to discuss ways to enhance the Rocket Express partnership with UT.

  • UT leadership met with the leadership of Lorain County Community College in fall 2017 to discuss possible future partnerships.

  • Winter Intersession courses will be piloted this academic year to provide students with additional opportunities to progress toward their degrees, as well as increase UT enrollment.

  • Summer courses will be expanded in summer 2018 to increase UT enrollment and to provide students with additional opportunities to progress toward their degrees.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Total UT enrollment


  • UT enrolled the best academically prepared class of first year students in school history in fall semester 2018, with an average ACT score of 23.02 and an average GPA of 3.45.

  • Total enrollment for fall 2018 is 20,304, compared to 20,579 students enrolled in fall 2017. The fall 2018 enrollment includes 16,065 undergraduate students and 4,239 graduate and professional students. The fall 2017 enrollment included 16,194 undergraduates and 4,385 graduate students.

  • The University experienced a significant increase in doctoral students’ enrollment, and the UT College of Law experienced a nearly 10 percent increase in student enrollment this year.

  • The freshman class is 1.5 percent larger in fall 2018 than the entering class in fall 2017, with 3,269 new students enrolled.

  • This is the sixth consecutive year with an increase in the number of students who returned to campus for their second years.

  • Direct-from-High School (DHS) enrollment increased by 1.7 percent in fall 2018 compared to last year.

  • Enrollment of transfer readmits increased by 21 percent compared to last year. (Transfer readmits are former UT students who dropped out for at least one semester and returned to UT after earning credit at another institution).

  • College Credit Plus enrollment increased by 7.9 percent.

  • During the 2018-19 academic year, UT will implement the second year of winter intersession courses, including online courses, which will help students make progress in their programs and increase enrollment at the University.

  • Summer session courses will be expanded to help students make progress in their programs and increase enrollment for summer semester 2018.

  • Initiatives are underway to enhance and expand existing and new transfer pathways, including implementation of the state of Ohio’s Transfer Assurance Guides (TAGs) and UT’s Rocket Express partnership with Owens Community College, as well as collaborations with other community colleges in the region.

  • UT is exploring the possibility of a new 2+2 program in nursing with Owens Community College. UT also is exploring the possibility of a 2+2 program with Northwest State Community College in the area of criminal justice.

  • In the fall of 2018, Chancellor John Carey, Ohio Department of Higher Education, sent a letter of appreciation to UT for the 50 or more UT faculty who served on statewide faculty panels and committees related to the development of transfer guidelines, including Ohio Guaranteed Transfer Pathways. Many UT faculty continue to serve on one or more statewide panels or committees as the transfer guidelines work continues.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Annual net revenue increase


  • Data will be available at close of fiscal year 2018.

  • Between FY17 and FY19, adjusting the Direct from High School Merit Scholarship matrix for the incoming class has provided movement toward a targeted annual reduction of total discounts by 2 percent.

October 2017

Outcome: Annual net revenue increase


  • Between FY17 and FY19, adjusting the Direct from High School Merit Scholarship matrix for the incoming class has provided movement toward a targeted annual reduction of total discounts by 2 percent.

  • Net revenue is expected to increase by 4% between FY17 and FY18 ($700.9 million vs. $728.1 million). (Note: FY17 net revenue excludes $40 million from the Affiliation Agreement.)

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Annual net revenue increase


  • Net revenue increased by 2.3 percent between FY16 and FY18 ($700.9 million vs. $716.8 million).

  • The initial 2016 baseline metric of $753.7 million is not consistent with 2016 net revenue (net revenue of student institutional aid). The correct number (which is used above and included in previous progress report updates) is $700.9 million.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Percentage share of the State Share of Instruction (SSI) funding pool


  • For FY18, UT’s percentage share of SSI is estimated to be 7.2 percent.

  • Preliminary estimates indicate that UT’s FY19 SSI share is on track to be within .5 percent of FY16 market share.

October 2017

Outcome: Percentage share of the State Share of Instruction (SSI) funding pool


  • For FY18, UT’s percentage share of SSI is estimated to be 7.2%.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Percentage share of the State Share of Instruction (SSI) funding pool


  • Preliminary estimates indicate that UT’s FY19 State Share of Instruction (SSI) is 7.1 percent, which is within .5 percent of FY16 market share (7.8 percent compared to 6.8 percent).

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Revenue from commercialization of research and technology transfer


  • Total revenue from commercialization of research and technology transfer in FY17 is $5.8 million.

  • Data for FY18 will be available at end of fiscal year.

  • Report on performance of other Ohio universities is not yet available.

October 2017

Outcome: Revenue from commercialization of research and technology transfer


  • Total income from technology transfer for FY17 is $5.8 million. Reports on performance of other Ohio universities is not yet available.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Revenue from commercialization of research and technology transfer


  • Total income from technology transfer for FY18 is $2.05 million.

  • Technology transfer for FY2013-2017 includes (per $10 million research expenditures): invention disclosures 12.3; licenses 2.2; license income $128,629; reimbursement rate 56%; startups formed 0.40.

  • Dr. Vijay Goel, Distinguished University Professor and director of the UT Center for Orthopaedic Research Excellence, was awarded the 2018 Ohio Faculty Council Technology Commercialization Award by Chancellor John Carey of the Ohio Department of Higher Education in Columbus in October 2018. Dr. Goel was recognized for his accomplishments toward the development and commercialization of the Libra Pedicle Screw System, which is being used in a growing number of hospitals and spinal surgery centers.

  • A UT alumnus who graduated in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering technology and participated in UT’s LaunchPad incubation program had his invention, called the “Grypmat,” included in Time magazine’s “Best Inventions of 2018” issue.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Revenue generated or cost reduction/avoidance from technology services and products


  • Continue to move University technology/key applications to cloud to reduce cash costs of server replacements. Key applications consist of Banner modules, Microsoft Office and Athena EMR (electronic medical records).

  • Microsoft Office 365 was recently moved to cloud.

  • Negotiated substantial cost reduction for McKesson electronic medical record (EMR) support.

  • Completed new agreement with Ellucian among Ohio’s public universities for Banner version 9 renewal that includes a cost reduction.

  • The project with Athena Health to develop and implement its new, cloud-based electronic medical records (EMR) is well underway, and the system will be implemented during FY19.

October 2017

Outcome: Revenue generated or cost reduction/avoidance from technology services and products


  • Going forward, the University is moving key applications to the cloud to reduce the cash costs of server replacements. Key applications consist of Banner modules, Microsoft Office and Athena EMR.

  • The project with Athena Health to develop and implement its new, cloud-based EMR is well under way, and the system will implement during FY19.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Revenue generated or cost reduction/avoidance from technology services and products


  • Continue to move University technology/key applications to the cloud to reduce cash costs of server replacements. Key applications consist of Banner modules, Microsoft Office and Athena EMR (electronic medical records).

  • Microsoft Office 365 was recently moved to the cloud.

  • Plans are underway to move H drives of faculty and staff to the cloud during FY19 and FY20, which will add storage capacity and reduce capital costs.

  • Negotiated a substantial cost reduction for McKesson EMR support.

  • Completed a new agreement with Ellucian among Ohio’s public universities for Banner version 9 renewal that includes a cost reduction.

  • In progress to build a joint development team with other Ohio public universities to drive improved functionality in Banner version 9 upgrades and lower costs of the third-party software products that function in the Banner ecosystem.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

May 2018

Outcome: Cost savings from operating efficiencies


  • Administrative dashboard reports that focus on trends in employee FTEs and departments’ expenses are in development.

October 2017

Outcome: Cost savings from operating efficiencies


  • Dashboard reports that focus on trends in employee FTEs and departments’ expenses are in development.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 3: INCREASE REVENUE AND OPERATING EFFICIENCIES.

November 2018

Outcome: Cost savings from operating efficiencies


  • FY18 cost savings from operational efficiencies are at 54.5 percent of the 2022 target. (Note: Target is 10 percent of FY17 operational expenses.)

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 4: IMPROVE UT’S INFRASTRUCTURE.

May 2018

Outcome: Completion of projects and initiatives proposed for the first five years of the Multiple-campus Master Plan


  • The Office of Finance and Administration estimates that 15% of projects and initiatives proposed for the first five years of the Multi-Campus Master Plan have been completed, including the $6 million renovation of Carlson Library.

  • Work completed includes: relocation of Purchasing Services from the Scott Park Campus to the Health Science Campus; relocation of the Department of Accounting from Scott Park to Rocket Hall; relocation of Accounts Payable/General Accounting/Payroll offices from Scott Park to Main Campus; renovation of research labs within the Block Health Sciences Building on Health Science Campus; light renovation and deferred maintenance in Carter Hall; renovation in Parks Tower (to be completed by August 2018); and updating of North Engineering’s steam and chilled water plants.

  • The Office of Finance and Administration submitted the University’s six-year capital plan to the state’s Office of Budget and Management in the fall of 2017 for review and prepare for the University’s two-year capital plan for the upcoming biennium in FY19-20.

October 2017

Outcome: Completion of projects and initiatives proposed for the first five years of the Multiple-campus Master Plan


  • The Office of Finance and Administration estimates that 10% of projects and initiatives proposed for the first five years of the Multiple-campus Master Plan have been completed.

  • Work completed includes: relocation of Purchasing Group from Scott Park to Health Science Campus (completed), relocation of Treasury Accounting from Scott Park to Rocket Hall (completed), and relocation of Accounts Payable/General Accounting/Payroll offices from Scott Park to main campus (to be completed by December 2017); renovation of research labs within the Block Health Sciences building on the Health Science Campus (to be completed by December 2017); light renovations and deferred maintenance in Carter Hall (completed summer 2017); renovations underway in Parks Tower (to be completed by August 2018); updating of North Engineering steam and chilled water plants( completed October 2017).

  • The Office of Finance and Administration will submit the university’s 6-year capital plan to the state’s Office of Budget and Management by mid-November 2017 for review and to prepare for the university’s two-year capital plan for the upcoming biennium FY 19/20.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 4: IMPROVE UT’S INFRASTRUCTURE.

November 2018

Outcome: Completion of projects and initiatives proposed for the first five years of the Multiple-campus Master Plan


  • The Office of Finance and Administration estimates that 20 percent of the projects and initiatives proposed for the first five years of the Multiple-campus Master Plan have been completed through the end of FY18. This is an increase from the 11 percent reported in May 2018.

  • With the combination of FY19-20 state and new local funds, work will begin on an additional 5-10 percent of projects and initiatives proposed for the first five years of the Multiple-campus Master Plan.

  • FY18 completed projects include: dining hall renovations (Ottawa East and Thompson Student Union), addition of Chick-Fil-A in Student Union, Carlson Library renovations, minor renovations to Carter Hall for the start of the 2017-18 academic year, North Engineering boiler plant and chilled water plant upgrades, Main Campus chilled water plant upgrades, research lab renovations in the Block Health Sciences Building, Parks Tower renovations, relocation of the finance offices (General Accounting, Accounts Payable, Payroll) from Scott Park to University Hall, relocation of purchasing (procurement) offices from Scott Park to the Ruppert Health Center, relocation of the treasurer’s office from Scott Park to Rocket Hall, Carlson Library bridge replacement, Health Education Building (HEB 100) renovations and HEB 110 renovations, improved bicycle network connectivity with the completion of Bancroft and University Hills reconstruction, renovation of the Student Involvement and Career Services offices, and expansion of branded banners and exterior signage on campus.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 4: IMPROVE UT’S INFRASTRUCTURE.

May 2018

Outcome: State funds invested annually into deferred maintenance projects


  • For FY17 and FY18, UT received $21.6 million in state appropriations; approximately 50 percent has been, or will be, invested into deferred maintenance projects.

  • On March 30, 2018, Governor John R. Kasich signed House Bill 529, which provides funding for capital projects. UT is set to receive requested funds for FY19-20 in the amount of $21.073 million.

October 2017

Outcome: State funds invested annually into deferred maintenance projects


  • For FY17 and FY18, UT received $21.6 million in state appropriations.

  • Approximately 50% has been, or will be, invested into deferred maintenance projects.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 4: IMPROVE UT’S INFRASTRUCTURE.

November 2018

Outcome: State funds invested annually into deferred maintenance projects


  • On March 30, 2018, Gov. John Kasich signed House Bill 529, which provides funding for capital projects. UT is set to receive requested funds for FY19-20 in the amount of $21.023 million.

  • Of the $21.023 million received from the state for FY19-20, nearly half will be spent on deferred maintenance. The deferred maintenance projects include:
    • Underground steam/condensation infrastructure improvements ($2 million)
    • Building envelope/weatherproofing ($2 million)
    • Mechanical system improvements ($2 million)
    • Electrical system enhancements ($2 million)
    • North Engineering lab/classroom renovations ($1 million [out of $3 million])
    • Classroom renovations ($.5 million [out of $1.5 million])
    • Research laboratory renovations ($.5 million [out of $1.5 million])

  • The total amount of state funds invested in deferred maintenance projects for FY19-20 totals $10 million (48 percent of $21.023 million).

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 4: IMPROVE UT’S INFRASTRUCTURE.

May 2018

Outcome: Completion of a UT technology strategic plan


  • The first documents defining the UT Technology Plan have been completed and are under review.

October 2017

Outcome: Completion of a UT technology strategic plan


  • The first documents defining the UT Technology Plan have been completed and will be reviewed with leadership and governance groups in spring 2018.

IV. FISCAL POSITIONING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Goal 4: IMPROVE UT’S INFRASTRUCTURE.

November 2018

Outcome: Completion of a UT technology strategic plan


  • The first documents defining the UT Technology Plan have been completed and are under review.

  • Approval was obtained from the Board of Trustees to replace the current telecomm system with new Cisco VOIP, which will be implemented during FY19 and FY20.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

May 2018

Outcome: UT's ranking in U.S. News & World Report among public, national universities


  • A University-wide task force has been established with representation from the Office of the President, Office of the Provost and Office of Marketing and Communications and continues to identify and evaluate the variables and issues that impact recognition at the national level for UT’s academic programs.

  • The University-wide task force has developed a comprehensive plan addressing all aspects of the rankings formula, with action items identified across all variables to elevate the University’s ranking into the top 100 among public, national universities.

October 2017

Outcome: UT's ranking in U.S. News & World Report among public, national universities


  • A university-wide task force has been established, with representation from the Office of the President, the Office of the Provost, and the Office of Marketing and Communications.

  • The task force has reviewed the formula and variables used for the rankings and assigned areas of responsibility to task force members, based on areas of the formula. Units are developing action plans for their areas of responsibility.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

November 2018

Outcome: UT's ranking in U.S. News & World Report among public, national universities


  • A University-wide task force has been established with representation from the Office of the President, Office of the Provost and Office of Marketing and Communications, and continues to identify and evaluate the variables and issues that impact recognition at the national level for UT’s academic programs.

  • The University-wide task force is developing a comprehensive plan addressing all aspects of the rankings formula, with action items identified across all variables to elevate the University’s ranking into the top 100 among public, national universities. This plan is being adjusted in fall 2018 to take into account changes to the formula introduced by U.S. News & World Report with the latest edition of rankings.

  • A reputation-building marketing campaign was implemented in 2016-17 and is ongoing to feature distinctive University programs, faculty research, initiatives and other achievements. The campaign includes monthly features from October through April shared via direct mail, printed postcards and emails to higher education peers and an interactive website that highlights multimedia content (utoledo.edu/features).

  • A targeted advertising campaign was implemented in 2017 with The Chronicle of Higher Education, featuring print and digital ads and email banners directing readers to the utoledo.edu/features website.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of nationally ranked academic programs and departments


  • The Office of the Provost has compiled a list of all ranked programs and programs that have the potential to be ranked among U.S. News & World Report listed programs.

  • Each college with ranked programs or programs with the potential to be ranked has developed a plan to elevate their rankings according to the formulae established for each field.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of nationally ranked academic programs and departments


  • The university-wide task force is in the process of identifying currently ranked programs, as well as programs that have strong potential to be ranked.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of nationally ranked academic programs and departments


  • The Office of the Provost has compiled a list of all ranked programs, as well as programs that have the potential to be ranked among U.S. News & World Report listed programs.

  • Each college with ranked programs or programs with the potential to be ranked has developed a plan to raise its rankings according to the formulae established for each field.

  • As of fall 2018, The University of Toledo has 18 undergraduate, graduate, online and professional programs that are nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report. Plans have been developed and are being implemented in several other programs to increase the number of ranked programs at the University.

  • UT’s undergraduate Business program moved up in the U.S. News & World Report ranking from 249 in 2018, to 235 in 2019.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

May 2018

Outcome: Individual program ranking in U.S. News & World Report


  • UT’s online programs moved up 17 spots in the rankings of “Best Online Programs: Bachelor’s” for 2018 in U.S. News & World Report; with a ranking of 125 out of 357 this year, compared to last year’s ranking of 142.

  • The online graduate education program in the Judith Herb College of Education moved up 2 spots in the rankings from 109 last year to 107 this year in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Online Graduate Education Programs” for 2018.

  • UT’s Master’s program in Nursing moved up 20 spots and is now ranked at 183 this year in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Nursing Schools: Master’s.”

  • UT’s Doctor of Nursing Practice program was ranked for the first time in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Nursing Schools: Doctor of Nursing Practice” for 2018.

October 2017

Outcome: Individual program ranking in U.S. News & World Report


  • See above, a university-wide task force is in the process of identifying currently ranked programs, as well as programs that have strong potential to be ranked.

  • The College of Medicine and Life Sciences is focusing on increasing research funding and expanding primary care to elevate its rankings.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

November 2018

Outcome: Individual program ranking in U.S. News & World Report


  • Personnel representing all ranked or rank-eligible undergraduate, graduate, online and professional programs have developed written plans and set goals to increase their rankings by 2022. These plans are being implemented by the colleges, with support and oversight from the Office of the Provost.

  • All ranked or rank-eligible undergraduate, graduate, online, and professional programs have developed written plans and have set goals to increase their rankings by 2022. These plans are being implemented by the colleges with support and oversight provided by the Office of the President.
  • UT’s undergraduate Business program moved up in the U.S. News & World Report ranking from 249 in 2018, to 235 in 2019.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

May 2018

Outcome: Average ACT score of incoming cohort of full-time undergraduate students


  • The average ACT composite score for the fall 2017 freshman class is 22.9, increased from 22.8 for fall 2016. We successfully enrolled more high-achieving new students which will contribute to improved retention.

  • The average ACT composite score of admitted and confirmed direct-from-high school (DHS) students for fall 2018 is higher than it was at the same time last year.

October 2017

Outcome: Average ACT score of incoming cohort of full-time undergraduate students


  • The average ACT composite score for the fall 2017 freshman class is 22.9, increased from 22.8 for fall 2016. We successfully enrolled more high-achieving new students which will contribute to improved retention.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

November 2018

Outcome: Average ACT score of incoming cohort of full-time undergraduate students


  • UT welcomed the best academically prepared class of first-year students in school history for the fall 2018 semester.

  • The average ACT score in fall 2018 is 23.02, and the average GPA is 3.45.

  • We successfully enrolled more high-achieving students, which will contribute to improved retention and graduation rates.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

May 2018

Outcome: UT's designation as a Carnegie Community Engaged Institution


  • The University established the new position of director of strategic initiatives in the fall of 2017 to track and promote university-community engagement; efforts are ongoing to collect and communicate this information as a resource to campus and community constituents.

  • The Division of Student Affairs met with the director of strategic initiatives to develop strategies to streamline, promote and document civic engagement initiatives for UT students.

  • UT students completed nearly 40,000 hours of service to the community during the 2017-18 academic year. This is a 59 percent increase from the previous year.

  • The Division of Student Affairs purchased a new software package that aids in data collection on student engagement with the community, and data collection for spring 2018 initiatives are currently in progress.

  • The Office of Government Relations is working with the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs on the mid-term review for The University of Toledo’s designation as a member of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities’ (APLU) “Innovation and Economic Prosperity (IEP) Universities Designation” program that is part of the APLU’s Commission on Innovation, Competitiveness and Economic Prosperity. The University of Toledo received this APLU designation in 2013, and work on this review will lay the groundwork for the renewal of UT’s designation as a Carnegie Community Engaged University in 2025. (Note that the APLU’s designation as an “Innovation and Economic Prosperity University” recognizes universities for their commitment to regional economic development through their work in economic engagement.)

  • The University established an Office of Workforce Development to collaborate with business and industry to contribute to workforce and economic development in the region. An Advisory Task Force on Workforce Development also was established and a survey was distributed to all UT faculty and staff to identify current and planned workforce activities. Survey respondents reported approximately 29 workforce development activities currently underway at UT, including partnerships with the East Toledo Family Center, Lucas County Jobs and Family Services, Toledo Museum of Art, The Toledo Repertoire Theatre, Toledo Public Schools, Jeep, Dana Corporation, First Solar and many other for-profit and nonprofit organizations in the region.

  • The UT Office of Workforce Development also is engaged with the workforce development initiative at the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

  • The University continues to develop partnerships with the community and region, and this year entered into a collaboration with the Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority (TARTA) to better connect UT’s students, faculty and staff to the community with free access to all TARTA bus routes. In addition, TARTA will manage UT’s bus services that connect the campus with the city.

  • The Office of the President is providing leadership for the Northwest Ohio Regional Higher Education Compact group that was established in January 2018 and includes two-year and four-year colleges and universities from the region to build on existing collaborations and partnerships to increase student access, retention and graduation rates, and to increase efficiencies among our institutions.

October 2017

Outcome: UT's designation as a Carnegie Community Engaged Institution


  • The University launched a new community engagement initiative in fall 2017 with the goal of collecting information, promoting and communicating university-community partnerships currently under way at UT, with a website to serve as a resource for campus constituents and community constituents. The university also established a new position of Director of Strategic Initiatives to promote university-community engagement.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

November 2018

Outcome: UT's designation as a Carnegie Community Engaged Institution


  • The University established the new position of director of strategic initiatives in the fall of 2017 to track and promote university-community engagement, and efforts are ongoing to collect and communicate this information as a resource to campus and community constituents.

  • The Office of Governmental Relations is working with the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs on the mid-term review for The University of Toledo’s designation as a member of the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities’ (APLU) “Innovation and Economic Prosperity (IEP) Universities Designation” program that is part of the APLU’s Commission on Innovation, Competitiveness and Economic Prosperity. The University of Toledo received this APLU designation in 2013, and work on this review will lay the ground work for the renewal of UT’s designation as a Carnegie Community Engaged University in 2025. (Note that the APLU’s designation as an “Innovation and Economic Prosperity University” recognizes universities for their commitment to regional economic development through their work in economic engagement.)

  • In the fall of 2018, the UT College of Nursing and ProMedica announced an expanded partnership to strengthen nursing education and address current and future health-care industry challenges. The expanded partnership will increase academic-clinical collaborations to advance nursing education, research and practice for undergraduate and graduate students.

  • A new initiative was developed in fall 2018 between The University of Toledo and the Toledo Museum of Art to advance visual literacy education. This agreement formalizes an ongoing effort to expand the teaching of visual literacy to UT students across all disciplines.

  • The mayor of Toledo and UT president kicked off “Rocket Week” in August 2018 with an official proclamation from the mayor and a ceremonial raising of the UT flag outside One Government Center.

  • UT’s Center for Health and Successful Living was recognized with the Debra A. Green Community Service Award in October 2018 for its work of providing advocacy and support services to the breast cancer community.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

May 2018

Outcome: Percentage of students who feel safe on UT campuses as measured by the Campus Climate Survey


  • The University’s Campus Climate Survey was administered in April 2018 and the results are currently under review.

  • The Division of Student Affairs, The University of Toledo Police Department (UTPD) and Transit Services met in September 2017 to discuss campus safety, and the decision was made to increase Night Watch program services.

  • UTPD is working to identify additional survey instruments to measure students’ perceptions of campus safety. Once additional instruments are identified and approved, they will be benchmarked and a target outcome determined.

  • UTPD releases daily messages and videos that promote safety efforts on campus.

  • In the fall of 2017, UTPD launched a digital media campaign on all UTPD social media platforms, including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

  • UTPD sponsored a “Meet the Office of Public Safety” event in fall 2017 and conducted eight “pizza with the police” events during the 2017-18 academic year.

  • In February 2018, as part of a community policing grant, UTPD conducted a campus community survey (and beyond through social media) to gauge the University’s community policing efforts and solicit feedback. The survey remains open indefinitely; however, assessment of survey results is scheduled to begin in May 2018.

October 2017

Outcome: Percentage of students who feel safe on UT campuses as measured by the Campus Climate Survey


  • The Division of Student Affairs, The University of Toledo Police Department (UTPD) and the Transportation department met in September 2017 to discuss campus safety, and the decision was made to increase Night Watch program services.

  • UTPD is working to identify additional survey instruments to measure students’ perceptions of campus safety. Once additional instruments are identified and approved, they will be benchmarked and a target outcome determined.

  • UTPD releases daily messages and videos that promote safety efforts on campus.

  • In fall 2017, UTPD launched a digital media campaign on all UTPD social media platforms; including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

  • UTPD sponsored a “Meet the Office of Public Safety” event in fall 2017 and has planned eight “pizza with the police” events during the 2017-18 academic year.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 1: IMPROVE AND STRENGTHEN OUR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION, AND IMPROVE TIES AT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS.

November 2018

Outcome: Percentage of students who feel safe on UT campuses as measured by the Campus Climate Survey


  • The University’s Campus Climate Survey was administered in April 2018 and survey results indicate that 86.7 percent of respondents answered “agree” (58.5 percent) or “strongly agree” (28.2 percent) to the question “I feel safe on UT campus.”

  • The Campus Climate Survey is administered in alternative years, with the next survey scheduled for 2020.

  • The state of Ohio certified the UT Police Department for meeting the third and latest group of new state standards for bias-free policing and other standards in order to strengthen community and police relations.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 2: DESIGN A UNIFIED BRANDING AND MARKETING PROCESS FOR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL VISIBILITY AND REPUTATION-BUILDING.

May 2018

Outcome: Completion of UT branding process and development of consistent messaging


  • The Division of University Advancement has completed the first phase of the brand study, which will be completed by June 2018. The second phase of the brand study will be completed by July.

  • A brand study survey was distributed to all faculty, staff and administrators in the spring of 2018 and targeted interviews were held with faculty, staff and administrators.

October 2017

Outcome: Completion of UT branding process and development of consistent messaging


  • The Division of Advancement initiated an RFP for a brand study, with responses due by mid-November. An agency will be selected by January, with the project to be completed by July 2018.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 2: DESIGN A UNIFIED BRANDING AND MARKETING PROCESS FOR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL VISIBILITY AND REPUTATION-BUILDING.

November 2018

Outcome: Completion of UT branding process and development of consistent messaging


  • The University engaged with an external advertising agency and in April 2018 conducted qualitative and quantitative research that engaged University stakeholders to determine common perceptions and values that positively impact engagement with UT.

  • A brand study survey was distributed to all faculty, staff and administrators in the spring of 2018; and targeted interviews were held with faculty, staff and administrators in the spring of 2018.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 2: DESIGN A UNIFIED BRANDING AND MARKETING PROCESS FOR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL VISIBILITY AND REPUTATION-BUILDING.

May 2018

Outcome: Total favorable mentions in highly valued, national media outlets


  • The baseline for media mentions is in the process of being created. The baseline will be established at the end of the 2018 fiscal year.

October 2017

Outcome: Total favorable mentions in highly valued, national media outlets


  • The baseline for media mentions is currently being established.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 2: DESIGN A UNIFIED BRANDING AND MARKETING PROCESS FOR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL VISIBILITY AND REPUTATION-BUILDING.

November 2018

Outcome: Total favorable mentions in highly valued, national media outlets


  • Developed 180 news releases in FY18 that resulted in more than 20,000 media mentions in local, regional and national media outlets.

  • Subscribed to EurekAlert!, a global news service operated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, beginning in July 2018 to enhance research news outreach.

  • Targeted media campaigns received widespread national coverage, including toy research in December 2017, news of a World War II veteran who graduated from UT in May 2018 and research on the impact of blue light from cellphones on eyesight in August 2018.

  • Planning is underway with the Office of the Provost and Office of Marketing and Communications to feature UT faculty researchers at the national level in the public radio segment known as “Academic Minute” that features faculty research related to the public good.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 2: DESIGN A UNIFIED BRANDING AND MARKETING PROCESS FOR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL VISIBILITY AND REPUTATION-BUILDING.

May 2018

Outcome: Exposure on national television for UT academic programs and research, and UT Athletics events


  • Five football players were nominated for national awards.

  • Football Head Coach Jason Candle and quarterback Logan Woodside were featured in numerous national media articles.

  • The Blade and/or BCSN had feature stories on every UT sport; and most sports had multiple stories.

  • Every home game of women’s soccer, volleyball, basketball and softball; as well as men’s basketball and baseball, were streamed live. Numerous events pertaining to women’s swimming, men’s tennis and women’s tennis were streamed, as well.

  • The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics continues to enhance multiple social media platforms; including Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat, for coverage of all sports.

  • All home football and basketball games had multi-platform social media coverage.

  • Home and away events for all sports had social media coverage on at least one platform, usually Twitter.

  • Multiple stories were posted on the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics’ website each day, often with as many as eight stories in one day.

  • Almost every home event and some away events were featured in video content on the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics’ website.

  • All football games, some basketball games and some Olympic sports events were featured in post-game photo albums on the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics’ website.

  • The alumni section of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics’ website is in progress.

October 2017

Outcome: Exposure on national television for UT academic programs and research, and UT Athletics events


  • The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics has five national television broadcasts in football, with each broadcast including 30-second institutional commercials.

  • Additional exposure for UT athletics includes: ESPN3 live streaming of fall sports with each including 30-second institutional commercials, as well as seven football games, 15 volleyball matches, eight women’s soccer games and two women’s swimming meets.

  • Social media exposure for UT athletic events includes Facebook (Toledo Rockets), with 31,051 followers and 32,803 “likes” during a typical week; Twitter, with 13,745 followers and total “tweets” of 20,530 during the last year; and Instagram, with 8,276 followers and 1,884 total posts.

  • Each athletic program also maintains a Twitter page and Facebook presence.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 2: DESIGN A UNIFIED BRANDING AND MARKETING PROCESS FOR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL VISIBILITY AND REPUTATION-BUILDING.

November 2018

Outcome: Exposure on national television for UT academic programs and research, and UT Athletics events


  • Developed 180 news releases in fiscal year 2018 that resulted in more than 20,000 media mentions.

  • Shared 820 news articles with the UT community in fiscal year 2018 to highlight campus events, research and other news.

  • In fiscal year 2018, UT was ranked for the second year as 14 out of 331 Division I institutions for social media engagement by Rival IQ, including Twitter with 10.7 million impressions and nearly 1 million engagements; Facebook with 8.9 million impressions and 388,560 engagements; YouTube with 2.6 million video views and 137 video projects, and Instagram with 83,000 impressions weekly. (Note: “Impressions” refer to the number of times users saw a post from UT, and “engagement” refers to the number of times users took an action on a post.)

  • UT football had seven national television broadcasts during the 2017 season, and plans are to have at least seven broadcasts in 2018. All other football games are streamed live on ESPN3 or ESPN+.

  • All women’s basketball home games and most away games are streamed live on ESPN3 or ESPN+. One game was broadcast on the Big Ten Network in 2017-18.

  • Buckeye Cable Sports Network (BCSN) produced and aired 20 Rocket athletic events in 2017-18, and plans are to do the same in 2018-19.

  • The (Toledo) Blade covers UT football and basketball on a near-daily basis, and covers other sports on an occasional basis.

  • Three football players have been promoted in 2018 for a total of 10 national position awards and other honors through email, social media and videos.

  • Articles on the UT football team and players have been featured in national publications, including The Athlete, ESPN.com, Sporting News and USA Today.

  • A total of 68 home events were produced by UT and live-streamed on ESPN3 or ESPN+ during the 2017-18 season. The sports included nearly all events in women’s volleyball, women’s soccer, men’s basketball, women’s basketball, baseball and softball. Additional events in women’s swimming and diving, men’s tennis and women’s tennis also were produced.

  • School production for ESPN will continue during the 2018-19 academic year, including the first production of the Inverness intercollegiate men’s golf tournament in September 2018, one of the only school-produced, college golf tournaments in the country.

  • UT Athletics works with WTOL to produce the weekly, 60-second “Rocket Insider” promo, and with Buckeye Cable Sports Network produces “Rocket Roundup,” a monthly news magazine featuring Rocket athletics.

  • Video highlights are included on the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics website and on social media for almost all home events, as well as away games for football.

  • UT Athletics uses social media/multiple platform coverage for all sports on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat, with Twitter coverage for all UT events (home and away) and Instagram and Snapchat coverage for home games.

  • Added “BoxOut Sports” graphics for Twitter in August 2018, which improved the look and flexibility of UT’s coverage of all sports.

  • Facebook “likes” of @UTRockets increased from 32,803 to 34,278 from May 1 - Oct. 9, 2018, with approximately 500 UT Athletics’ posts during this time.

  • Twitter followers of @UTRockets increased from 13,745 to 15,256 from May 1 - Oct. 9, 2018, with approximately 2,552 UT Athletics’ posts during this time.

  • Instagram followers of UTRockets increased from 8,276 to 10,200 from May 1 - Oct. 9, 2018, with 588 UT Athletics’ posts during this time.

  • A new, weekly podcast about Rocket Athletics (“The Rocket Liftoff”) debuted in September 2018.

  • A redesign of the UT Athletics website (UTRockets.com) was completed in August 2018.

  • A total of 1,130 stories were posted on the UT Athletics website during the 2017-18 academic year, including 56 stories that featured the academic achievements of UT’s student-athletes.

  • Alumni outreach has been added to the UT Athletics website and includes an alumni survey, an all-time letter-winners list and a link to stories about UT alumni.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 3: GROW THE UT HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM TO BETTER SERVE NORTHWEST OHIO.

May 2018

Outcome: Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) composite quality score


  • The University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC) is committed to increasing its Hospital Compare Overall Quality Star Rating to demonstrate overall hospital quality and high-quality patient care, and is in the process of developing measurable initiatives to achieve this goal.

October 2017

Outcome: Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) composite quality score


  • Specific action plans have been developed for each element.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 3: GROW THE UT HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM TO BETTER SERVE NORTHWEST OHIO.

November 2018

Outcome: Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) composite quality score


  • The University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC) has established the objective of achieving the Hospital Compare Overall Quality Star Rating of 3 stars by December 2019 and has communicated this goal to faculty and staff to demonstrate overall hospital quality and high-quality patient care.

  • UTMC has established the objective to eliminate the medical center’s “Hospital-Acquired Condition” (HAC) reduction program penalty and neutralize value-based purchasing related penalties by December 2019.

  • UTMC also has established the objectives of improving clinical documentation and improving health-quality information management.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 3: GROW THE UT HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM TO BETTER SERVE NORTHWEST OHIO.

May 2018

Outcome: Rating on question "How would you rate your hospital?" in the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS)


  • UTMC has created a standardized, evidence-based patient experience model for the inpatient units that provides professional training and development for nurses and physicians.

  • UTMC developed and implemented the iCARE Evidence-based Health-care Leadership Academy to support UT health-care leaders’ professional development to enhance patient satisfaction outcomes.

  • UTMC redesigned and streamlined its customer service, complaint and grievance collection processes to include telephone, email, web, social media and other modalities.

October 2017

Outcome: Rating on question "How would you rate your hospital?" in the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS)


  • Baseline and target metrics have been established: Baseline 2016: 21st percentile; Target 2022: 35th percentile.

  • Training initiatives are being implemented during the next two years.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 3: GROW THE UT HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM TO BETTER SERVE NORTHWEST OHIO.

November 2018

Outcome: Rating on question "How would you rate your hospital?" in the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS)


  • The University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC) has created a standardized, evidence-based patient-experience model for the inpatient units (HCAHPS) that provides professional training and development for nurses and physicians.

  • UTMC developed and implemented the iCARE Evidence-Based Healthcare Leadership Academy to support UT health-care leaders’ professional development to enhance patient satisfaction outcomes. The academy provides professional development in the areas of performance management, critical conversations, team building, time management, meeting effectiveness, resource management, recruitment, onboarding, progressive discipline and culture building.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 3: GROW THE UT HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM TO BETTER SERVE NORTHWEST OHIO.

May 2018

Outcome: Number of new patients


  • UTMC is investing in service lines in psychiatry, orthopaedics and family practice by expanding services and resident positions, and adding faculty.

  • In addition, UTMC is exploring additional opportunities in bariatric surgery and inpatient long-term care.

  • UTMC is reviewing and evaluating the possibility of developing and/or purchasing urgent care sites as an ambulatory initiative.

  • UTMC is actively growing detox services and recruiting necessary providers.

  • UTMC also is focusing on increasing the number of Medicaid patients due to new funding opportunities.

  • During the next three-to-five years, UTMC will expand its UTP physician practice to meet the needs of the region.

October 2017

Outcome: Number of new patients


  • Increasing investment in existing service lines, such as orthopedic and family practice, by expanding resident positions and adding faculty, as well as exploring additional opportunities in behavioral health, bariatric surgery and inpatient, long-term care.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 3: GROW THE UT HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM TO BETTER SERVE NORTHWEST OHIO.

November 2018

Outcome: Number of new patients


  • UTMC is investing in service lines in relation to psychiatry, orthopaedics and family practice by expanding services and resident positions, as well as adding faculty.

  • In addition, UTMC is exploring additional opportunities in bariatric surgery and inpatient, long-term care.

  • UTMC is reviewing and evaluating the possibility of developing and/or purchasing urgent care sites as an ambulatory initiative.

  • UTMC is actively growing detox services and recruiting necessary providers, with new beds opening in April of 2018.

  • UTMC also is focusing on increasing the number of Medicaid patients due to new funding opportunities.

  • Over the next three-to-five years, UTMC will expand its UTP physician practice to meet the needs of the region.

  • Since 2014, UTMC has expanded its UTP physician practice by 31 percent.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 4: INCREASE PHILANTHROPY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC GOALS.

May 2018

Outcome: Undergraduate alumni annual giving participation rate


  • The alumni participation rate was 4.68 percent through the end of April for the 2018 fiscal year.

October 2017

Outcome: Undergraduate alumni annual giving participation rate


  • Alumni giving is ongoing, and is currently 2.25% through the end of October for FY18.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 4: INCREASE PHILANTHROPY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC GOALS.

November 2018

Outcome: Undergraduate alumni annual giving participation rate


  • UT’s undergraduate alumni participation rate is 5.34 percent as of June 30, 2018.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 4: INCREASE PHILANTHROPY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC GOALS.

May 2018

Outcome: Total fundraising to the University as measured by total gift amount


  • New fundraising revenue for UT is expected to more than double, reaching $48.3 million for FY18, compared to $22.1 million for FY17

October 2017

Outcome: Total fundraising to the University as measured by total gift amount


  • Total fundraising is ongoing.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 4: INCREASE PHILANTHROPY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC GOALS.

November 2018

Outcome: Total fundraising to the University as measured by total gift amount


  • New fundraising revenue for UT more than doubled, reaching $50.9 million for FY18, compared to $22.1 million for FY17.

  • During the University’s second annual Day of Giving (“Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives” 36-hour social media fundraising campaign) held Oct. 17-18, 2018, the number of donors nearly doubled last year’s participation, with 3,156 donors giving this year compared to 1,600 last year. Alumni, friends, faculty, staff and students contributed a total of $717,375 during the 2018 Day of Giving campaign. During the 2017 Day of Giving campaign, donors contributed $450,000 in support of student scholarships and programs at the University.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 4: INCREASE PHILANTHROPY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC GOALS.

May 2018

Outcome: Support provided from the UT Foundation to the University


  • Support provided to the University from the UT Foundation in FY17 increased 13.9% over the baseline five-year average total support provided to UT. (Note that the five-year average as of 2016 was $14.74 million; and in FY17 the UT Foundation provided $16.8 million in support to the University.)

October 2017

Outcome: Support provided from the UT Foundation to the University


  • Ongoing.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 4: INCREASE PHILANTHROPY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC GOALS.

November 2018

Outcome: Support provided from the UT Foundation to the University


  • Support provided to the University from the UT Foundation in FY18 increased by 18.8 percent during the five-year average total support to UT. (Note that the five-year average as of 2017 was $15.4 million, and in FY18 the UT Foundation provided $18.3 million in support of the University.)

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 4: INCREASE PHILANTHROPY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC GOALS.

May 2018

Outcome: Planning and initiation of a comprehensive capital campaign


  • The feasibility study for the comprehensive campaign was completed in May 2018.

  • Case statements for support are being developed by the colleges and units in anticipation of the initiation of the silent phase of the campaign, which will begin in the fall of 2018.

October 2017

Outcome: Planning and initiation of a comprehensive capital campaign


  • The Division of Advancement is conducting a feasibility study for the comprehensive campaign; it will be completed by April 2018.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 4: INCREASE PHILANTHROPY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC GOALS.

November 2018

Outcome: Planning and initiation of a comprehensive capital campaign


  • The Campaign Steering Committee, with membership of influential donors and supporters of the University, has been established and will hold its first meeting in October 2018.

  • The theme of UT’s comprehensive campaign is “Ready to Launch.”

  • A Case for Support prospectus has been completed.

  • The University is in the silent phase of the campaign, and colleges and units of the University have developed their statements of support.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 5: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: GPA ranking for student-athletes among all Mid-American Conference (MAC) institutions


  • Student-athletes at The University of Toledo continue to rank among the top of the Mid-American Conference (MAC) institutions in student-athletes’ GPA.

  • UT student-athletes achieved the highest overall, cumulative GPA in the MAC for fall semester of 2017, with a 3.29 GPA.

  • UT student-athletes earned a combined GPA of 3.235 in the spring 2018 semester.

  • The MAC’s spring 2018 GPA rankings and overall 2017-18 academic year GPA rankings will be announced in summer 2018.

  • The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics hired an academic coordinator, and Student-Athlete Academic Support Services continues to provide resources and services to all student-athletes to improve overall GPA.

  • All student-athletes are tracked on STARFISH and Blackboard Observer to monitor their academic progress.

October 2017

Outcome: GPA ranking for student-athletes among all Mid-American Conference (MAC) institutions


  • Student-Athlete Academic Services is providing 98 tutoring appointments per week and has established partnerships with the Learning Enhancement Center for MATH, EES and PHYS courses.

  • All student-athletes are tracked on STARFISH to monitor their academic progress.

  • More than 230 faculty and staff have opted-in to Blackboard Observer for SAAS advisers to use as a tool to track and monitor student-athletes’ academic progress.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 5: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: GPA ranking for student-athletes among all Mid-American Conference (MAC) institutions


  • Student-athletes at The University of Toledo continue to rank among the top of the Mid-American Conference (MAC) institutions in GPA.

  • UT student-athletes earned the MAC Institutional Academic Achievement Award for 2017-18 for the highest overall institutional GPA for student-athletes among all MAC institutions, with the highest ever institutional grade-point average of 3.266 among student-athletes.

  • This is the fifth time in the last seven years that the Rockets have won this award.

  • In addition, for the first time, UT female student-athletes received the MAC Faculty Athletics Representative Academic Achievement Award for the conference institution with the highest overall GPA rank for both men and women student-athletes in 2017-18. This is the first time UT women student-athletes have won the award. The UT men student-athletes have won the award three times. UT had the highest GPA rank, as the Rocket women carried the highest league GPA in women’s golf, while posting the second-highest GPA ranks in women’s soccer and women’s tennis, and the third-best GPA ranks in women’s cross country and women’s track and field during the 2017-18 academic year.

  • UT also earned the MAC Jacoby Trophy for 2017-18, recognizing the top women’s athletics program based on league competition.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 5: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

May 2018

Outcome: Fan attendance at UT sporting events


  • Attendance was strong in all three key areas of football, men’s basketball and women’s basketball during the 2017-18 academic year.

  • Football led the Mid-American Conference (MAC) in attendance this year (2017-18).

  • Women’s basketball led the MAC in attendance this year (2017-18) and was 32nd in the nation.

  • Men’s basketball was second in the MAC in attendance this year (2017-18).

October 2017

Outcome: Fan attendance at UT sporting events


  • Football season ticket sales for 2017-18 have increased approximately 3% compared to last year, with 10,380 season tickets sold.

  • Men’s basketball ticket sales is at 88% of its goal as of October 27, 2017, and women’s basketball is at 95% of the goal for 2017-18. Sales are expected to increase as we approach the final two weeks before the season begins.

  • Attendance at football games is averaging 22,360, which is the No. 1 ranking in the MAC (the MAC average is 16,947).

  • Student attendance at football games averages 4,439 (as of October 27, 2017) per game, with more than 6,000 students attending the home opener against Elon and 4,700-plus for Tulsa and homecoming.

V. REPUTATION AND ENGAGEMENT

Goal 5: IMPROVE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS, RETENTION AND DEGREE COMPLETION.

November 2018

Outcome: Fan attendance at UT sporting events


  • After four home football games, the UT Rockets led the MAC in attendance with an average of 25,153 fans; the MAC average was 17,405 for fan attendance.

  • In addition, the UT Glass Bowl was recently ranked as the No.4 college football stadium in the country, based on a national fan poll conducted by Podium.com Fan Poll and published by Business Insider, with the ranking of the top 25 stadiums in the nation.

KEY

All Colleges All academic colleges Arts and Letters; Business and Innovation; Judith Herb College of Education; Engineering; Graduate Studies; Health and Human Services; Honors; Law; Medicine and Life Sciences; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; University College
Alum Alumni Relations
Ath Athletics
CE Community Engagement (to be created)
CELCS Center for Experiential Learning and Career Services
CISP Center for International Studies and Programs
COGS College of Graduate Studies
COMLS College of Medicine and Life Sciences
Comp Compliance
Counsel Counseling Center
CP Community Policing/Campus Police
DEM Division of Enrollment Management
Dev Development
DL Distance Learning
F&A Finance and Administration
F&C Facilities and Construction
GC General Counsel
GR Government Relations
HR&TA Human Resources
IR Institutional Research
IT Information Technology
MarCom Marketing and Communications
ODI Office of Diversity and Inclusion
OMSS Office of Multicultural Student Success
President President
Provost Provost
R&SP Research and Sponsored Programs
SA Student Affairs
SDS Student Disability Services
UA Undergraduate Admission
UTF UT Foundation
UTMC University of Toledo Medical Center
UTP University of Toledo Physicians
VPA Vice President for Advancement
Last Updated: 12/11/18