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COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCE AND HUMAN SERVICE


Administration
Academic Departments
Graduate Programs
Department of Counselor Education & School Psychology
Department of Criminal Justice
Department of Kinesiology
Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services
Department of Occupational Therapy
Department of Physical Therapy
Department of Social Work
Department of Legal Specialities

Find a Major or Degree in the College of Health Science and Human Services

Administration

Beverly J. Schmoll, dean
Health and Human Services Building Room 3302
Phone: 419.530.5452
beverly.schmoll@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.5540

Barbaranne Benjamin, associate dean for academic affairs
Health and Human Services Building Room 2400H
Phone: 419.530.2757
barbaranne.benjamin@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.5541

Barbara Kopp-Miller, associate dean for research and quality
Health and Human Services Building Room 2400E
Phone: 419.530.5308
barbara.koppmiller@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.5541

Sharon Periat, director of student services
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100B
Phone: 419.530.5306
sharon.periat@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.5366

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Academic Departments


Department of Criminal Justice and Social Work

Morris Jenkins, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 3000
Phone: 419.530.2313
morris.jenkins@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.2153

Mark Wintgens, academic adviser for criminal justice
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100E
Phone: 419.530.5360
mark.wintgens@utoledo.edu

Heather Tessler, academic adviser for social work
Health and Human Services Building room 1100A
Phone: 419.530.5360
heather.tessler@utoledo.edu

Department of Health and Recreation Professions

Joseph Dake, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 1000C
Phone: 419.530.2767
joseph.dake@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.4759

Staci Sturdivant, academic adviser for health and recreation
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100D
Phone: 419.530.5360
staci.sturdivant@utoledo.edu

Angela DeAngelo, academic adviser for health administration
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100K
Phone: 419.530.4624
Angela.deangelo@utoledo.edu

Department of Kinesiology

Barry Scheuermann, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 2503B
Phone: 419.530.2692
barry.scheuermann@.utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.2477

Sandra Browning, academic adviser for exercise science and athletic training
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100D
Phone: 419.530.5360
sandra.browning@utoledo.edu

Heather Tessler, academic adviser for respiratory care
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100A
Phone: 419.530.4462
heather.tessler@utoledo.edu

Department of Military Science and Leadership - Army ROTC

Jonathan Beasley, Chair
Health Education Center Room 2120
Phone: 419.530.4699
jonathan.beasley@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.4698

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences

Michelle M. Masterson, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 2000
Phone: 419.530.4688
michelle.masterson@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.4780

Staci Sturdivant, academic adviser
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100D
Phone: 419.530.5360
staci.sturdivant@utoledo.edu

Department of School Psychology, Legal Specialties, and Counselor Education

Martin Ritchie, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 3100A
Phone: 419.530.4064
martin ritchie@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.7879

Heather Tessler, academic adviser for minor in counseling program
Health and Human Services Building room 1100A
Phone: 419.530.5360
heather.tessler@utoledo.edu

Staci Sturdivant, academic adviser for paralegal studies program
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100D
Phone: 419.530.5360
staci.sturdivant@utoledo.edu

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Graduate Programs


The College of Health Science and Human Service offers flexible programs leading to diverse master's, education specialist and doctoral degrees in both academic and professional fields. All students are encouraged to discuss programs with graduate faculty in their respective departments.

Admission to Graduate Programs
Admission requirements for College of Graduate Studies are discussed in a prior section of the College of Graduate Studies section of this catalog; other admission procedures are described under the individual graduate programs. Admission to graduate study in the College of Health Science and Human Services is open to graduates of accredited colleges and universities meeting the minimum admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies as well as specific admission requirements of the department and/or program. Previously admitted students wishing to transfer to a different department or program must apply for admission to that new department or program. Admission to one program does not guarantee admission to another program. Please refer to the degree program descriptions for specific information.

Administration of Programs
All graduate programs in the College of Health Science and Human Service are administered jointly by the college and the College of Graduate Studies of The University of Toledo. Students may contact specific departments, the college's graduate advisor, or the College of Graduate Studies for further information on programs or admission requirements. The associate dean for research and graduate education coordinates graduate policies within the college.

Advising
Students may contact Jon Borland for initial advising at jon.borland@utoledo.edu. Students must meet with their faculty advisor for the purpose of developing a plan of study. It is the student's responsibility to meet all requirements for the degree as specified by the graduate program, the department, the College of Graduate Studies and the University of Toledo. Students are encouraged to complete the plan of study during the first semester of matriculation.

Graduate Degrees Offered
  • Master of Arts in Counselor Education
    • Community Counseling
    • School Counseling
  • Master of Arts in School Psychology
  • Education Specialist in School Psychology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education
  • Master of Arts in Criminal Justice
  • Master of Science in Exercise Science
    • Applied Biomechanics
    • Clinical Kinesiology
    • Exercise Physiology
    • Athletic Training
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Science
  • Master of Arts in Recreation and Leisure Studies
    • Recreation Administration
    • Recreational Therapy
    • Recreational Therapy and Therapeutic Arts
  • Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Health Education
  • Occupational Therapy Doctorate
  • Doctor of Physical Therapy
  • Master of Social Work

Graduate Certificates
  • Certificate in Elder Law
  • Certificate in Juvenile Justice (with Master of Arts in Criminal Justice)

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Department of Counselor Education & School Psychology

Martin Ritchie, chair

Accreditation
The master's degree programs in school counseling and community counseling and the Ph.D. program in counselor education and supervision are accredited by The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The school psychology program is approved by The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP).

Master's and Education Specialist Programs
Department admission requirements, in addition to the College of Graduate Studies requirements, include the following: Undergraduate degree in an appropriate foundational field with a 3.0 (on a 4.0-point scale) minimum undergraduate grade point average (GPA), an official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score (taken within the last five years) with a preferred combined score (verbal plus quantitative) of 1000. Applicants holding a doctoral degree from an accredited college or university are not required to submit a GRE score. Applicants holding a master's degree from an accredited college or university and whose cumulative graduate coursework meets or exceeds a 3.5 g.p.a. on a 4.0 scale are not required to submit a GRE score. Applicants will submit a typed personal statement (suggested length two to three pages) detailing significant personal and professional experiences that relate to the applicant's decision to pursue a career in counseling. Submission of a professional resum� and three letters of recommendation are required. All application materials are submitted to the College of Graduate Studies. Applicants who meet academic admission criteria will be invited to interview with the department admissions committee before a final admissions decision is rendered.

Master of Arts in Counselor Education: School Counseling Track
The master's degree in school counseling meets the academic requirements for a K-12 school counselor licensure In Ohio and other states and consists of 48 semester hours including a 600 clock hour internship in a school setting. Neither Ohio nor Michigan requires teacher certification to be licensed as a school counselor. Applicants expecting to practice outside of Ohio should consult that state's department of education to determine the current certification or licensure requirements. Prospective applicants are urged to review information on the department web site at http://www.utoledo.edu/hshs/cesp/.

General Core Requirements (3 hours)
HSHS 6000 Statistics and Research for Health Science and Human Service Professionals
or
RESM 5310 Educational Research
School Counseling Major Courses (45 hours)
Required Courses
COUN 5010 Professional Orientation to School Counseling
COUN 5110 Career Counseling & Development
COUN 5120 Individual & Group Assessment
COUN 5130 Group Counseling
COUN 5140 Counseling Theories & Techniques
COUN 5150 Counseling Across the Lifespan
COUN 5160 Cultural Diversity for Counselors & School Psychologists
SPSY 5170 Consultation I: Theories & Techniques
COUN 5190 Counseling Practicum
COUN 6/8940 Counseling Internship
SPED 5000 Issues in Special Education
or
SPED 5120 Students with Special Needs
(SPED not required for students with Special Education Teacher Licensure)
Elective Courses *
COUN 5980 Special Topics in Counselor Education
COUN 6210 Psychopathology
COUN 6220 Child, Adolescent, Family Therapy
COUN 6230 Crisis Intervention Counseling
COUN 6240 Diagnosis and Mental Health
COUN 6/8470 Drugs and Mental Health Counseling
COUN 6960 Master's Research Thesis (Instructor Permission)
COUN 6990 Master's Independent Study (Instructor Permission)
COUN 8460 Substance Abuse Counseling
EDP 5210 Child Behavior and Development
EDP 5220 Adolescent Behavior and Development
SPSY 5040 Legal & Ethical Issues for School Psychologist & Counselors
*Other courses may be approved by adviser.
Total: 48 hours
School Counseling Licensure Endorsement Program
Any licensed or license-eligible professional counselor or professional clinical counselor or any student in the community counseling master's program who wants school counselor licensure, but is not seeking admission to the master's degree in school counseling, must apply for admission to the school counseling licensure endorsement program. The application consists of an application form, official transcripts of graduate work in counseling, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement clarifying the reasons the applicant wishes to become a licensed school counselor. There is no fee for the application; the application is submitted directly to the Department of Counselor Education and School Psychology. The applicant may be required to appear for an interview. Students must be admitted to the endorsement program before they will be permitted to enroll in the required 600 clock hour internship.

Master of Arts in Counselor Education: Community Counseling Track
The master's degree in community counseling is a prerequisite for licensure as a professional counselor or professional clinical counselor in Ohio and other states and prepares students to work in mental health agencies, substance abuse agencies, private practice, and a wide variety of settings including hospitals, colleges, and the criminal justice system. The curriculum leading to the master's degree consists of 48 semester hours of training. Applicants seeking licensure as professional counselors or professional clinical counselors in Ohio need an additional 12 hours of graduate study beyond the 48 hours. Prospective applicants are urged to review information on the department web site at http://www.utoledo.edu/hshs/cesp/.
General Core Requirements (3 hours)
HSHS 6000 Statistics and Research for Health Science and Human Service Professionals
or
RESM 5310 Educational Research
Community Counseling Major Courses (45 hours)
Required Courses
COUN 5020 Prof Orient to Community Counseling
COUN 5110 Career Counseling & Development
COUN 5120 Individual & Group Assessment
COUN 5130 Group Counseling
COUN 5140 Counseling Theories & Techniques
COUN 5150 Counseling Across the Lifespan
COUN 5160 Cultural Diversity for Counselors & School Psychologists
COUN 5190 Counseling Practicum
COUN 6/8940 Counseling Internship
Elective Courses: *
SPSY 5/7170 Consultation I: Theories and Techniques
COUN 6/7210 Psychopathology
COUN 6/7220 Child, Adolescent, Family Therapy
COUN 6/7230 Crisis Intervention Counseling
COUN 6/7240 Diagnosis & Mental Health
COUN 6/8470 Drugs & Mental Health Counseling
COUN 7540 Advanced Personality Assessment
COUN 8460 Substance Abuse Counseling
EDP 5/7230 Adult Development
EDP 5210 Child Behavior & Development
EDP 5220 Adolescent Behavior & Development
*Other courses may be approved by adviser.
Total: 48 hours
Master of Arts/Education Specialist Degree in School Psychology
The graduate program in school psychology prepares students to become K-12 licensed school psychologists. The education specialist degree (Ed.S), leading to eligibility to take the State of Ohio Department of Education school psychology licensure exam, consists of three years of full-time study, which includes approximately 79 graduate semester hours of course work, a two-semester practicum experience during the second year, and a 9-month, full-time internship (minimum of 1200 clock hours) in a school setting completed during the third year. Students earn a master of arts (M.A.) after completing a minimum of 32 hours of coursework and 100 field experience hours or 120 hours for those without a teaching license. The Ed.S. is earned after completion of the remaining coursework and internship and is required for licensure as a school psychologist.
The application deadline for the school psychology program is January 15. To apply to the program, applicants must meet the minimum academic prerequisite and submit the following materials:
  • Minimum academic prerequisite: Undergraduate GPA of 2.7 (for admission to the College of Graduate Studies) and for the school psychology program, a preferred undergraduate GPA of 3.0
  • GRE scores (taken within the last five years) with a required minimum combined score (verbal plus quantitative) of 800 and a preferred combined score of 1000
  • College of Graduate Studies application for the master's degree in school psychology
  • Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which must address the applicant's academic potential (i.e. from a university faculty member)
  • Statement of purpose, between two to three pages, that details the reasons the applicant would like to pursue a career in school psychology and includes personal experiences. The statement of purpose should be typed and submitted to the College of Graduate Studies
  • Official undergraduate transcripts (and graduate transcripts, if applicable)
  • Completion of an interview with a school psychologist
  • Professional resum�

To be consistent with national training standards and to ensure sufficient faculty members to advise and mentor students, a limited number of applicants will be admitted into the program each year. As a result, admission is competitive. Applicants may be required to interview with an admissions committee.
The curriculum leading to the master's degree and education specialist degree in school psychology consists of the following:

Master of Arts in School Psychology
Core Requirements (6 hours)
RESM 5110 Quantitative Methods I
HSHS 6000 Statistics and Research for Health Science and Human Service Professionals
or
RESM 5310 Educational Research
Required Courses (minimum of 26 hours)
SPSY 5030 Role & Function of the School Psychologist
SPSY 5040 Legal & Ethical Issues for School Psychologists & Counselors
SPSY 5170 Consultation I: Theory & Techniques
SPSY 5180 Consultation II: School and Home Collaboration
SPSY 5300 Psychoeducational Assessment & Interventions
SPSY 5/7310 Psychoeducational Assessment & Interventions II
EDP 5/7330 Behavior Management
or
SPED 5340 Advanced Behavior Management
Select two of the following:
COUN 5/7140 Counseling Theories & Techniques
COUN 5/7160 Cultural Diversity for Counselors & the School Psychologists
EDAS 6000 The Individual in Organizations (Note: only for those without current teaching license)
EDP 5210 Child Behavior & Development
EDP 5/7320 Instructional Psychology
SPSY 6/7260 Developmental Child Psychopathology
or
PSY 6270 Clinical Child Psychology
SPED 5000 Issues in Special Education
Total for master's degree: Minimum of 32 hours

Education Specialist in School Psychology
Required Courses (minimum of 32 hours beyond the master's degree)
SPSY 7180 Consultation II: School and Home Collaboration
SPSY 7190 Consultation III: School and Community Collaboration
SPSY 7320 Psychoeducational Assessment & Interventions III
SPSY 7330 School Psychology Practicum I
SPSY 7940 Internship in School Psychology (Fall and Spring Semester)
Select any of the following courses not previously taken for the master's degree:
COUN 5/7140 Counseling Theories & Techniques
COUN 5/7160 Cultural Diversity for Counselors & the School Psychologists
EDAS 6000 The Individual in Organizations (note: only for those without current teaching license)
EDP 5210 Child Behavior & Development
EDP 5/7320 Instructional Psychology
SPSY 6/7260 Developmental Child Psychopathology
or
PSY 6270 Clinical Child Psychology
SPED 5000 Issues in Special Education
Total for education specialist degree: Minimum of 32 hours beyond the master's degree
Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education
The department of counselor education and school psychology offers course work leading to the doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in counselor education and supervision and prepares students for careers in community agencies, schools, colleges and universities, and private practice. Opportunities exist within this program to create areas of specialization that are relevant to the academic, professional or research interests of the student. The program objectives and curricular experiences of the doctoral program reflect an extension of those offered at the master's and specialist levels.

Persons applying for admission to doctoral study must meet the admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies, the College of Health Science and Human Service, and the department of counselor education and school psychology. These requirements include an application for graduate admission, one set of official transcripts from each institution attended showing degree attained, three letters of recommendation, and a non-refundable application fee that must be submitted to the College of Graduate Studies to begin the admission process. In addition, departmental requirements for admission to the doctoral program are:
  • Aminimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0-point scale for all graduate-level academic work
  • Amaster's degree in counseling from a program that is approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Applicants with degrees from non-accredited programs must demonstrate their equivalency to approved programs or make up any deficiencies that may be present in their training.
  • GRE scores (taken within the last five years) with a preferred combined score (verbal plus quantitative) of 1040
  • Aresum� and autobiographical statement of three to five pages in length
  • One writing sample. The writing sample consists of your responses to questions about your academic and professional background and goals. These questions can be obtained by contacting the departmental secretary at 419.530.2718. The writing sample is designed to determine your writing ability and your suitability to the profession and to the doctoral program.
  • Apersonal interview with departmental faculty to determine the personal and professional suitability and leadership potential of the applicant. Applicants will be notified if they are selected for an interview.

Applicants are interviewed and admitted to doctoral study in the department during the fall, spring and summer semesters of each academic year.

The curriculum leading to the doctor of philosophy degree in counselor education consists of a minimum of 60 semester hours.
Research Tools (12 hours)
RESM 7330 Qualitative Research I
RESM 8120 Quantitative Methods II
RESM 8320 Research Design
Select one course from the following:
RESM 8130 Multivariate Statistics
RESM 8160 Nonparametric Statistics
RESM 8340 Qualitative Research II
RESM 8350 Methods of Survey Research
HEAL 8700 Epidemiology
Counseling Major Courses (38 hours)
Required Courses (34 hours)
COUN 8500 Adv Theory and Practice of Career Couns
COUN 7510 Supervision in Couns & Sch Psyc
COUN 7520 Educ & Leadership in MH Profession
COUN 7530 Adv Theories Couns & Consultation
COUN 7930 Doctoral Research Seminar
COUN 8410 Adv Pract Indiv & Group Couns
or
COUN 8420 Adv Practicum in Family Therapy
COUN 8440 Adv Group Theory and Practice
COUN 8480 Adv Train Prof, Legal and Ethical Issues
COUN 8940 Counseling Internship
Elective Courses (4 hours *)
COUN 7210 Psychopathology
COUN 7220 Child, Adolescent Family Therapy
COUN 7230 Crisis Intervention Counseling
COUN 7240 Diagnosis and Mental Health
COUN 7540 Adv Personality Assessment
COUN 8450 Couples and Family Therapy
COUN 8460 Substance Abuse Counseling
COUN 8470 Drugs & Mental Health
* Other courses may be approved by program committee.
Doctoral Dissertation (10 hours)
Total: 60 hours

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Department of Criminal Justice

Lois Ventura, interim chair

The department of criminal justice offers a graduate program leading to a master of arts in criminal justice as well as an optional certificate in juvenile justice. In addition, the department of criminal justice and the College of Law offer a joint degree program leading to the master of arts in criminal justice and the juris doctor.

Master of Arts in Criminal Justice
The master of arts in criminal justice is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the criminal justice system, social control and the nature of crime, in addition to developing and improving skills necessary to critically assess criminal justice problems and develop meaningful responses to these problems. The program also provides students with the skills to conduct applied research and evaluation, as well as the ability to understand empirical scholarly publications. The program allows students to develop a plan of study that will help prepare for leadership roles in the field of criminal justice and to pursue criminal justice doctoral studies. The program allows a person to be either a full-time or part-time student. A full-time student can complete the program in one year, while a part-time student should be able to complete the program in two or three years.

In addition to the College of Graduate Studies and College of Health Science and Human Service requirements, evaluation of applicants for the criminal justice graduate program is based on the following criteria: (a) application, (b) three letters of recommendation, (c) personal statement, (d) official transcripts with a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.70 on a 4 point scale. Applicants with a GPA of less than 2.70 must take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Prospective students should contact the department for further information. Finally, meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee entrance into the program. Admission is competitive and is dependent on the availability of space within the program. Under special circumstances, the department graduate admissions committee may choose to admit a promising applicant as a provisional student in the program.

The master of arts in criminal justice requires 33 semester hours. A student may elect to complete a thesis in lieu of 3 credit hours of elective course work. A student who does not complete a thesis must pass a comprehensive exam after earning 33 approved semester graduate credit hours. Although a student can earn all 33 semester credit hours from criminal justice courses, a minimum of 24 semester credit hours must be from criminal justice courses. The remaining 9 hours can be from approved graduate courses in other areas that meet the academic and career objectives of the student. A student is allowed to select a total of 6 hours of elective course work to be applied for degree requirements from CRIM 5400, CRIM 6940, CRIM 6950, and CRIM 6990 with a total of 3 credit hours in any one of these courses counted toward degree requirements. For additional information see department web site at http://www.utoledo.edu/hshs/criminaljustice/.
Core Courses (15 hours)
CRIM 6000 Advanced Theories in the Criminal Justice System
CRIM 6100 Metropolitan Problems and the Criminal Justice System
CRIM 6200 Data Analysis
CRIM 6400 Research Methodology
CRIM 6420 Advanced Criminal Procedure
Criminal Justice Electives (9 hours)
Electives (9 hours) - Course can be either Criminal Justice graduate elective classes or graduate classes outside the Department of Criminal Justice
Total: 33 hours
For students entering into the program in January 2009, the distribution of the required 33 hours will change. The criminal justice electives will reduce to 3 hours with electives remaining at 9; core courses increasing to 21 hours with the inclusion of:
Core Courses (21 hours)
CRIM 6610 Corrections Policy and Administration
CRIM 6620 Police and Society
Certificate in Juvenile Justice
An optional certificate program in juvenile justice is offered as part of the master of arts in criminal justice degree program. This certificate is designed to provide a student with a more in-depth study of juvenile justice issues. The certificate requires the successful completion of the requirements for the master of arts in criminal justice degree and a minimum of 12 credit hours in juvenile justice courses which may be counted as criminal justice electives or electives. A student may not pursue a certificate or enroll in any certificate course without first obtaining written approval from the criminal justice graduate coordinator.
Juvenile Justice Certificate (12 hours)
CRIM 6310 Juvenile Justice in the Metropolitan Community
Select 9 credit hours from the below list:
CRIM 5370 Disproportionate Confinement of Minority Youth
CRIM 5400 Criminal Justice Field Study (Must be a placement in the community with an agency/program that deals with juvenile delinquents, troubled juveniles or at-risk youths.)
CRIM 6990 Independent Study in Criminal Justice (Must be on an aspect dealing with the juvenile justice system, juvenile delinquents, troubled youths or youths at risk.)
CRIM 6/8410 Theory and Research: Emotional Behavioral Disorders
CRIM 6/8440 Teaching Youth with Emotional Behavioral Disorders
CRIM 6/8450 Adjudicated-Locked Setting: Emotional Behavioral Disorders
CRIM 6/8460 Hospital Setting: Emotional Behavioral Disorders
CRIM 6/8510 Behaviors - Incarcerated Child/Youth
CRIM 6/8520 Practicum: Child Study Institute
In January 2009, the requirements for the Juvenile Justice certificate will be:
CRIM 6310 Juvenile Justice in the Metropolitan Community
Select 9 credit hours from the below list:
CRIM 5370 Disproportionate Confinement of Minority Youth
CRIM 5400 Criminal Justice Field Studies (Must be a placement in the community with an agency/program that deals with juvenile delinquents, troubled youths, or youths at risk)
CRIM 6940 Criminal Justice Internship (Must be a placement in the community with an agency/program that deals with juvenile delinquents, troubled youths, or youths at risk)
CRIM 6980 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (Must be approved by the graduate coordinator and be a course which focuses on an aspect of the juvenile justice system.
CRIM 6990 Independent Study in Criminal Justice (Must be on an area dealing with juvenile delinquents, troubled youths, or youths at risk)
Joint M.A. in Criminal Justice/Juris Doctor
Students pursuing this joint degree program must be first admitted to the College of Law. After successful completion of the first year, a student of the College of Law may apply for the joint degree program. For more information on this joint degree program, please contact the department of criminal justice.

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Department of Kinesiology

Charles W. Armstrong, chair

The department of kinesiology offers graduate programs leading to the master of science in exercise science (M.S.E.S.) and the doctor of philosophy in exercise science (Ph.D.) degrees. These programs involve a combination of courses, seminars, clinical experiences and research that is intended to prepare individuals for a wide range of careers that relate to exercise science. The programs are interdisciplinary by design and all students are exposed to multiple dimensions of the field. As part of this program, students typically take courses that support their work from a variety of other departments, including those on the university's health science campus. Involvement in research is emphasized throughout the program.

Admission into the master's and doctoral programs is selective and is based on the applicant's previous academic training, academic record, scores on the GRE, letters of recommendation, intended area of study and space within the graduate program. Meeting the minimum standards for admission does not guarantee acceptance into any of the department's programs.

Master of Science in Exercise Science

The master of science in exercise science (M.S.E.S.) is designed to provide students with an opportunity to specialize in one of four areas: applied biomechanics, clinical kinesiology, exercise physiology or athletic training. Each of these programs involves a minimum of 36 semester hours of instruction. Full-time students typically are able to complete the programs in two years.
Research Foundations (12 hours)
KINE 5110 Measurement and Statistical Inference
or
RESM 5110 Quantitative Methods I
KINE 6230 Scientific Writing and Research Methods
KINE 6960 Thesis
Kinesiology Core (6 hours)
KINE 6100 Physiology of Exercise
KINE 6130 Biomechanics of Human Motion
Specialization Requirements (6 hours)
Specialization Electives (12 hours)
Total: (36 hours)
In addition to the College of Graduate Studies and College of Health and Human Service requirements, evaluation of applicants for admission to the master of science in exercise science program is based on the following criteria: (a) minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 hours of the undergraduate program; (b) completion of the GRE, with a recommended minimum combined score of 900 for the quantitative and verbal portions of the exam; (c) a clearly defined statement of purpose that specifies the area of specialization within the degree program; (d) a minimum of three letters of reference from faculty members with specific expertise in kinesiology (or a closely related area) who have worked with the applicant in an academic setting; (e) demonstrated knowledge in human anatomy, human physiology and two additional areas of kinesiology (exercise physiology, motor learning, biomechanics, etc.); and (f) all other pertinent information requested in the application. Prospective students should contact the department for further information or visit our web site at http://www.utoledo.edu/hshs/kinesiology/.

Meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission to the program. Admission to a specific program area is dependent on the availability of space within the specialization area (i.e. the number of students currently being advised by faculty in the specialization area). Under special circumstances, the department graduate admissions committee may choose to waive any of the above requirements.

Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Science

The doctor of philosophy in exercise science is designed to provide qualified applicants with an opportunity to pursue advanced study and research leading to the completion of the Ph.D. degree. The program requires completion of a minimum of 72 post-master's credits, and involves a variety of courses, seminars and independent research experiences that typically require four years of full-time study to complete (part-time study may be possible in some program areas, . Students work closely with a faculty mentor to design a program that meets the unique needs of the individual. This includes courses in the major area that may be taken from a variety of departments and may also include courses in a cognate area (a secondary area of specialization). Upon the completion of all course work, students must pass written and oral comprehensive examinations and complete a dissertation.
Sample Doctoral Plan of Study
Research Foundations (12 hours)
RESM 8120 Quantitative Methods II
RESM 8320 Research Design
RESM 8130 Multivariate Statistics
HEAL 8750 Applied Biostatistics
Specialization Electives (15 hours)
KINE 8100 Physiology of Exercise
KINE 7250 Readings in Exercise Biology
KINE 8440 Exercise metabolism and Endocrinology
KINE 8550 Laboratory Techniques In Exercise Biology
KINE 8560 Skeletal Muscle Biology
Specialization Electives (9 hours)
Dissertation Research (36 hours)
Total: 72 hours
In addition to the College of Graduate Studies requirements, evaluation of applicants for the doctoral program is based on the following criteria: (a) completion of a master's degree in exercise science or closely related area, (b) completion of the GRE, with a recommended minimum combined score of 1060 for the quantitative and verbal portions of the exam, (c) a clearly defined statement of purpose that specifies the area of specialization within the degree program, (d) a minimum of three letters of reference from faculty members with specific expertise in kinesiology (or a closely related area) who have worked with the applicant in an academic setting. Prospective students should contact the department for further information. Note: Meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee entrance into the program. Under special circumstances, the department graduate admissions committee may choose to waive any of the above requirements.

A unique opportunity exists for students pursing either the DPT or OTD degrees at the University of Toledo to also complete the Ph.D. degree in exercise science. This option is designed for those individuals who wish to be trained as occupational or physical therapists, but ultimately aspire to teaching and research careers in the health sciences.

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Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services

Ruthie Kucharewski, chair

The department of health and rehabilitative services offers a variety of degree options and graduate courses in health/wellness and rehabilitation. In health/wellness, master's level options include the master of arts in recreation and leisure studies and the doctor of philosophy degree in health education. In rehabilitative services, the master of arts in speech-language pathology and the master of arts in recreation and leisure studies with specialization in recreational therapy or in recreational therapy and therapeutic arts are available. For more information, please visit the department web site at http://www.utoledo.edu/hshs/health_rehab_service.

Master of Education in School Health Education/School Nurse Certification
The department of health and rehabilitative services also provides major course work for the master of education in health education and for the master of education in health education with school nurse certification.

Master of Education in School Health Education
Required Education Courses (12 hours)
Students must complete at least one course from each of the four basic areas.
Cultural Foundations Choose 1 course from the following (3 hours)
TSOC 5100 Group Process in Education
TSOC 5110 Modern Educational Controversies
TSOC 5200 Sociological Foundations of Education
TSOC 5210 Multicultural Non-Sexist Education
TSOC 5230 Intergroup & Intercultural Education
TSOC 5300 Philosophy & Education
TSOC 5400 History of Schooling & Teaching in U.S.
Research Foundations Choose 1 course from the following (3 hours)
RESM 5110 Quantitative Methods
RESM 5210 Educational Testing & Grading
RESM 5310 Educational Research
RESM 5330 Qualitative Research Methods I: Introduction & Basic Methods
Curriculum Choose 1 course from the following (3 hours)
CI 5870 Secondary School Curriculum
CI 6300 Principles of Instructional Development
CI 6810 Curriculum Development K-12
CI 6820 Program Development for Non-School Settings
CI 6830 Trends in School Curriculum
CI 6840 Curriculum for Educational Leaders
HEAL 6850 Patient Health Education
SPED 5000 Issues in Special Education
Psychology Foundations Choose 1 course from the following (3 hours)
EDP 5110 Basic Educational Psychology
EDP 5120 Alternative Approaches to Discipline
EDP 5210 Child Behavior & Development
EDP 5220 Adolescent Behavior & Development
EDP 5230 Adult Development
EDP 5310 Issues & Innovations in Learning & Instruction
EDP 5320 Instructional Psychology
EDP 5330 Behavior Management
EDP 6340 Theories of Learning
Required Health Courses (9 hours)*
HEAL 6500 Issues in School Health
HEAL 6600 Health Behavior
HEAL 6920 Master's Research Project in Health Education
or
HEAL 6960 Master's Research Thesis in Health Education (3 hours)
Electives (15 hours) At least 18 hours must be HEAL courses.

Master of Education in School Health Education (School Nurse Licensure)
Required Education Courses (22 hours)
Cultural Foundations
TSOC 5200 Sociological Foundations of Education
or
TSOC 5230 Intergroup & Intercultural Education
Research Foundations
RESM 5100 Quantitative Methods I
Curriculum
SPED 5000 Issues in Special Education
HEAL 6850 Patient Health Education
Psychological Foundations
EDP 5210 Child Behavior and Development
or
EDP 5220 Adolescent Behavior and Development
Counselor and Human Service Education
COUN 5010 Introduction to School Counseling
COUN 5150 Counseling Across the Lifespan
Required Health Courses (18 hours)
HEAL 5400 Professional Issues in School Nursing
HEAL 5940 School Health Internship
HEAL 5950 School Nurse Workshop
HEAL 6500 Issues in School Health
HEAL 6530 Drug Use and Misuse
HEAL 6920 Master's Research Project in Health Education
or
HEAL 6960 Master's Research Thesis in Health Education

Master of Arts in Recreation and Leisure: Recreation Administration, Recreational Therapy, or Recreational Therapy and Therapeutic Arts

The recreation and leisure studies program offers advanced study beyond the bachelor's degree in recreation administration, recreation therapy, or recreation therapy and therapeutic arts. These degrees focus on the study of the profession of recreation and recreation therapy with an emphasis on administrative careers.

Admission Requirements
  • Acceptance into the College of Graduate Studies
  • Abachelor's or professional degree earned from a department of approved standing and granted by an accredited college or university
  • A2.70 or equivalent grade point average (GPA) for all previous academic work or a minimum Graduate Record Examination Score (GRE) of 800
  • Prerequisite academic work that indicates the applicant should be able to pursue effectively the master of arts in recreation and leisure studies.
  • Proof of health and accident insurance
  • Satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) if from a country where English is not the primary language
Research Core (Select A, B, or C from the following Culminating Research Options) (9-12 hours)
Research Culminating Experience: Option A (9 credit hours)
RCRT 5940 Internship
RCRT 5420 Leisure Program Research Techniques
Research Culminating Experience: Option B (9 credit hours)
RCRT 6920 Master's Project in Recreation & Leisure
RCRT 5420 Leisure Program Research Techniques
Select 1 Research/Statistics course from the following:
HSHS 6000 Statistics and Research for Health Science and Human Service Professionals
RESM 5110 Quantitative Methods I
SOC 5290 Social Research Statistics
HEAL 6750 Applied Biostatistics
Research Culminating Experience: Option C (12 credit hours)
RCRT 6920 Master's Thesis
RCRT 5420 Leisure Program Research Techniques
Select 1 Research/Statistics course from the following:
HSHS 6000 Statistics and Research for Health Science and Human Service Professionals
RESM 5110 Quantitative Methods I
SOC 5290 Social Research Statistics
PUBH 6750 Applied Biostatistics (3 credit hours)
Recreation and Recreation Therapy Core (9 Hours)
RCRT 5210 Leisure Theory and Popular Culture
RCRT 6000 Issues and Trends in Recreation and Recreational Therapy
RCRT 6020 Financial Resources of Recreation and Recreational Therapy
Specialization Area (9-12 hours)
Select courses from the recreational therapy support area with adviser.
Electives (3-6 hours)
Approved by adviser to accommodate a total of 36 hours.
NOTE: Prerequisite coursework may be required, specifically for the recreation therapy or recreation therapy and therapeutic arts degrees.

Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology
The program provides course work and clinical experiences for a master of arts in speech-language pathology that are applicable toward attainment of certification and state licensure in the area of speech-language pathology. The process of certification and/or licensure includes completion of the master's degree, approved undergraduate preparation, suitable clinical experiences, demonstrated of learning outcomes, and successful completion of the national specialty examination in speech-language pathology. Students seeking certification and/or licensure for speech-language pathology should meet with the graduate program adviser to assess prior experience and design a program that is tailored to the student's individual situation.

Students with undergraduate preparation in speech-language pathology will be considered for entry into the graduate program. Students without adequate undergraduate preparation should contact the program or the College of Health Science and Human Service graduate advisor, Jon Borland at jon.borland@utoledo.edu for information regarding undergraduate prerequisites.

For fall admission to the speech-language pathology program, all materials, including application, letters of recommendation, writing samples, and GRE scores must be received before Jan. 15 to receive complete consideration.

The graduate program in speech-language pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Research Core (6 hours)
SLP 6030 Research in Speech-Language Pathology
HSHS 6000 Statistics and Research for Health Science and Human Service Professionals
or
RESM 5110 Quantitative Methods
or
RESM 5310 Educational Research
Speech-Language Pathology Courses (35-41 hours)
SLP 6100 Diagnosis of Speech and Language Disorders
SLP 6210 Preschool Language Disorders
SLP 6220 Language Disorders in School-Age Children
SLP 6300 Phonological and Articulatory Disorders
SLP 6400 Neurological Disorders: Aphasia
SLP 6450 Neurological Disorders: Brain Injury and Dementia
SLP 6500 Motor Speech Disorders
SLP 6550 Augmentative and Alternative Communication
SLP 6600 Voice Disorders
SLP 6650 Dysphagia and Oropharyngeal Disorders
SLP 6700 Assessment and Remediation of Fluency Disorders
SLP 6800 Aural Rehabilitation
SLP 6930.003 Seminar: Clinical Methodology
Clinical experiences from: SLP 6000, 6010, 6020 and 6940
Thesis or Comprehensive Examination (3-6 hours)
SLP 6930.002 Seminar in Speech-Language Pathology
or
SLP 6960 Research Thesis

Doctor of Philosophy in Health Education
The doctoral degree program in health focuses on advanced study and research in community/health education. The program prepares advanced students to contribute to the field of health through research. Although research and health courses are required, the program is individualized through selection of a cognate and elective courses to develop each student for leadership roles in universities, public service or the private health sector.

Admission to the program includes completion of a master's degree from an accredited institution. In addition to the College of Graduate Studies requirements, evaluation of applicants is based on the following criteria: (1) completion of the GRE, (b) a clearly defined statement of purpose that specifies the area of specialization within the degree program and (c) a minimum of three letters of reference from faculty members with specific expertise in health who have worked with the applicant in an academic setting. Evidence of research and/or writing ability through a master's thesis, project, paper, report, publication or paper presented to a professional society will be considered. International applicants must submit a TOEFL score of 550 or higher for admission to the program. Prospective students should contact the department for further information.

An opportunity exists for graduate students interested in pursuing a joint OTD/PhD degree in Occupational Therapy and Health Education. This joint degree program provides occupational therapy students with the clinical practice, advocacy, leadership, research and scholarship skills needed to pursue careers in higher education.
General Core Requirements (12 credit hours)
HEAL 8880 Scientific Writing in Health
RESM 8120 Quantitative Methods II
RESM 8320 Research Design
Select one from: RESM 7330, 8130, 8160, 8350 or HEAL 8700
Major Courses (36 hours)
Required Courses
HEAL 8000 Professional Issues in Health Education
HEAL 8100 College Teaching of Health Education
HEAL 8200 Methods and Materials in Public Health
HEAL 8300 Community Health Organization
HEAL 8460 Health Promotion Programs
HEAL 8600 Health Behavior
HEAL 8640 Issues in Public Health
HEAL 8800 Evaluation of Health Programs
HEAL 8900 Grant Writing
Elective Courses:
Consult with adviser to develop appropriate sequence of courses to meet student's goals.
Cognate Areas (12 hours)
Consult with adviser.
Doctoral Dissertation (10 hours)

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Department of Occupational Therapy

Julie Thomas, chair

The department of occupational therapy provides a sequence of coursework, field placements, and capstone experiences that culminate in the occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) degree.

Occupational Therapy Doctorate
The occupational therapy doctorate is a full-time program, eight semesters in length inclusive of two summer terms. Due to the sequential nature of the curriculum, matriculation to the OTD program occurs fall semester only. Applications are available mid-July in the calendar year prior to admissions; applications may be submitted anytime after September 1st for admission the following academic year. For complete information on the OTD program, please visit the departmental web site at http://hsc.utoledo.edu/healthsciences/ot/index.html or access application materials online at http://hsc.utoledo.edu/grad/application.html. If you have questions, please contact us at occtherapydoctorate@utoledo.edu.

Admission requirements
  • Bachelor degree in any field of study; minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 must be completed prior to starting the program.
  • GRE with minimum mean percentile of 33% across all three sections. If the undergraduate GPA is 3.5 or greater or if the applicant has a master's degree with a GPA of at least 3.0, the GRE is not required.
  • Prerequisite Courses: Biology (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Human Anatomy and Physiology (6 semester or 8 quarter credits). Introduction to Psychology (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Abnormal Psychology (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Introduction to Sociology or Anthropology (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Lifespan human development: met by either 1) B- or better in a lifespan human development course (3 semester or 4 quarter credits) that covers human development from birth to death or 2) B- or better in both a child development (3 semester or 4 quarter credits) course and a gerontology/psychology of aging course (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Medical Terminology (course or competency test.
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Writing sample
The OTD program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education of the American Occupational Therapy Association.
OTD Program Curriculum Sequence
Year 1 Fall Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
OCCT700 3 Conceptual Framework of Therapeutic Occupation
OCCT701 5 Occupational Therapy Models of Practice I
OCCT711 4 Research in Occupational Therapy I
OCCT721 2 Occupational Therapy Advocacy I
OCCT731 1 Fieldwork and Professional Development Seminar I
Year 1 Spring Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
OCCT702 5 Occupational Therapy Models of Practice II
OCCT703 4 Occupational Therapy Models of Practice III
OCCT812 3 Research in Occupational Therapy II
OCCT740 2 Conditions in Occupational Therapy
OCCT732 1 Fieldwork and Professional Development Seminar II
Year 1 Summer Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
OCCT704 5 Occupational Therapy Models of Practice IV
OCCT722 2 Occupational Therapy Advocacy II
OCCT733 1 Fieldwork and Professional Development Seminar III
Yr. 1 Total =38
Year 2 Fall Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
OCCT805 5 Occupational Therapy Models of Practice V
OCCT806 4 Occupational Therapy Models of Practice VI
OCCT823 2 Occupational Therapy Advocacy III
OCCT834 1 Fieldwork and Professional Development Seminar IV
OCCT813 3 Research in Occupational Therapy III
Year 2 Spring Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
OCCT807 4 Occupational Therapy Models of Practice VII
OCCT808 3 Occupational Therapy Models of Practice VIII
OCCT824 3 Occupational Therapy Advocacy IV
OCCT835 3 Fieldwork and Professional Development Seminar V
Year 2 Summer Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
OCCT840 3 Physical Agent Modalities and other Non-occupational approaches
OCCT836 3 Fieldwork Level II
Yr. II Total =33
Year 3 Fall Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
OCCT836 3 Fieldwork Level II (continued)
OCCT837 6 Fieldwork Level II
Year 3 Spring Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
OCCT814 3 Research In Occupational Therapy IV
OCCT838 6 Capstone Practicum
OCCT890 3 Mentored Capstone Dissemination
OCCT891 3 Mentored Studies in Capstone Area
    or
  3 Elective in Capstone Area
Yr. III Total=24
Total of 95 credit hours for the Occupational Therapy Doctorate Program.


Occupational Therapy Doctorate/Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Science
The dual degree of occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in exercise science is designed to meet the growing need for occupational therapy faculty members who are prepared to conduct and mentor research. The graduates of the dual degree program will not only have the credentials but also the skills needed for successful careers in academia.

Admission to the OTD/Ph.D. is a two-step process. The first step is admission to the OTD program. See the occupational therapy doctorate section for admission requirements. In the second semester of the OTD program, the student applies for admission to the Ph.D. in exercise science. If selected for admission, the student will be officially admitted to the Ph.D. program at the beginning of the second year in the OTD program. Students may apply up to 18 credits of their OTD program for credit in the Ph.D. program. Please contact the occupational therapy program at occtherapydoctorate@utoledo.edu or the department of kinesiology for more information on the dual degree.

Occupational Therapy Doctorate/Doctor of Philosophy in Health Education
The dual degree of occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in health education is designed to meet the growing need for occupational therapy faculty members who are prepared to conduct and mentor research. The graduates of the dual degree program will not only have the credentials but also the skills needed for successful careers in academia.

Admission to the OTD/Ph.D. is a two-step process. The first step is to be admitted to the OTD program. See the occupational therapy doctorate section for admission requirements. During the OTD program, the student completes the second step by applying for admission to the Ph.D. in health education. Students may apply up to 21 credits of their OTD program for credit in the Ph.D. program. Please contact the occupational therapy program at occtherapydoctorate@utoledo.edu or the department of health and rehabilitative services for more information on the dual degree.

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Department of Physical Therapy

Michelle Masterson, interim chair
The department of physical therapy offers an accredited graduate program leading to the doctor of physical therapy (DPT) degree.

Doctorate in Physical Therapy
The doctorate in physical therapy (DPT) program, located on the Health Science Campus of UT, is a cost effective program that consists of 92 credit hours, spanning 32 months beyond the bachelor's degree. The program accepts applicants from across the country; however, 22 of the 28 individuals in the entering class are filled by qualified UT and BGSU applicants. For complete information on the DPT program, please visit the departmental website at http://hsc.utoledo.edu/hshs/pt/.

Full time enrollment starting in the fall is required to complete the DPT program.

Admission Requirements
  • Bachelor's degree prior to starting the program
  • Up-to-date transcript(s)
  • Postsecondary GPA of 3.0 or above.
    • Knowledge of the field of physical therapy (shadowing a physical therapist is highly recommended to gain knowledge of the field)
  • Three letters of recommendation (one from a physical therapist)
  • Interview
Pre-Requisites Courses
  • Biology (for science majors): 2 courses, each a minimum of 3 semester hours or equivalent
  • Chemistry (for science majors): 2 courses, each a minimum of 3 semester hours or equivalent
  • Physics (algebra based): 2 courses, each a minimum of 3 semester hours or equivalent
  • Psychology: 2 courses, each a minimum of 3 semester hours or equivalent
Highly Recommended Courses
  • Anatomy & Physiology: 1 or 2 semesters or equivalent
  • Introduction to Biomechanics: 1 semester
  • Introduction to Exercise Physiology: 1 semester
  • Introduction to Statistics: 1 semester
Applications for the DPT program are accepted until December 1st prior to the year of anticipated matriculation into the program (fall enrollment only). Completion of the two prerequisite courses in biology, two of the prerequisite courses in either physics or chemistry, and one of the prerequisite courses in psychology is required prior to submission of application.
Year 1 Fall Semester Required Courses:
Course Credit Hours Course Name
PHYT 500 4 Gross Anatomy
PHYT 505 3 Analysis of Movement I
PHYT 511 3 Clinical Pathophysiology
PHYT 535 2 Intro to Examination
PHYT 545 2 Foundations of PT
PHYT 575 1 Clinical Reasoning I
Total: 15 Credit Hours
Year 1 Spring Semester Required Courses (13 weeks didactic/2 weeks clinical):
Course Credit Hours Course Name
PHYT 506 1 Analysis of Movement II
PHYT 507 3 Neuroscience
PHYT 508 1 Neuroscience Seminar
PHYT 517 2 Research Design & Measurement
PHYT 527 3 Applied Exercise Physiology
PHYT 528 2 Therapeutic Interventions I
PHYT 585 1 Clinical Practicum I
Total: 13 Credit Hours
Year 1 Summer Semester Required Courses (8 weeks didactic/2 weeks clinical):
Course Credit Hours Course Name
PHYT 502 2 Lifespan I
PHYT 518 2 Applied Biostatistics
PHYT 520 2 Health Promotion
PHYT 530 1 Therapeutic Exercise
PHYT 565 1 Pharmacology
PHYT 586 1 Clinical Practicum II
Total: 9 Credit Hours
Year 2 Fall Semester Required Courses (15 weeks didactic):
Course Credit Hours Course Name
PHYT 617 2 Scholarly Project I
PHYT 626 3 Cardiovascular-Pulmonary PT
PHYT 628 2 Therapeutic Interventions II
PHYT 646 2 Teaching & Learning
PHYT 650 3 Musculoskeletal Rehab I
PHYT 660 3 Neuromuscular Rehab I
Total: 15 Credit Hours
Year 2 Spring Semester Required Courses (15 weeks didactic):
Course Credit Hours Course Name
PHYT 602 2 Lifespan II
PHYT 605 1 Health Care Policy & Delivery
PHYT 618 2 Scholarly Project II
PHYT 651 3 Musculoskeletal Rehab II
PHYT 661 3 Neuromuscular Rehab II
PHYT 672 2 Special Topics in PT (to meet the 2 hour elective requirement)
PHYT 675 1 Clinical Reasoning II
Total: 14 Credit Hours
Year 2 Summer Semester Required Courses (8 weeks clinical/2 weeks didactic):
Course Credit Hours Course Name
PHYT 685 4 Clinical Practicum III
PHYT 619 1 Scholarly Project III
PHYT 670 1 Professional Issues
Total: 6 Credit Hours
Year 3 Fall Semester Required Courses (8 weeks didactic/8 weeks clinical):
Course Credit Hours Course Name
PHYT 705 2 Practice Management
PHYT 710 3 PT Management of Complex Patients
PHYT 720 1 Scholarly Project IV
PHYT 762 2 Trauma Rehab
PHYT 789 4 Clinical Internship I
** Total: 12 Credit Hours
Year 3 Spring Semester Required Courses (8 weeks clinical/8 weeks specialized internship):
Course Credit Hours Course Name
PHYT 790 4 Clinical Internship II
PHYT 799 4 Specialty Internship
Total: 8 Credit Hours
Total of 92 Credit Hours for the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program.

Doctorate in Physical Therapy/Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Science
There is a significant demand for physical therapists who have attained the additional doctor of philosophy degree to serve as core faculty in academic positions to educate DPT students and to serve as physical therapists with clinical expertise and research experience to expand the knowledge base of the profession.

Admission to the DPT/Ph.D. program is a two-step process. The first step is to be admitted to the DPT program. Students interested in being considered for the Ph.D. in exercise science degree program in the department of kinesiology will then apply to that program in the second semester of the first year of the DPT program. This process will follow the established procedures for application to the Ph.D. program. The application must identify a faculty member in the physical therapy department as a sponsor who will, if the student is admitted, serve on the student's doctoral committee. If selected for admission, the student will be officially admitted to the Ph.D. program at the beginning of the second year in the DPT Program. Students may apply up to 18 credits of their DPT program for credit in the Ph.D. program.

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Department of Social Work

Terry Cluse-Tolar, chair

Master of Social Work
The graduate program in social work is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

The master of social work degree has an advanced generalist perspective, preparing students to create change at all system levels, from individuals to communities. Students may select a concentration in either mental health or in child and family services.

An advanced standing program exists for students with a baccalaureate social work degree from an undergraduate social work program accredited by CSWE who meet specific criteria. Students with related degrees will not be admitted under advanced standing status but are eligible for admission for the full 60-credit-hour program.

Admission Requirements
In addition to the admission criteria established by the College of Graduate Studies at The University of Toledo, the applicant to the MSW program must have completed undergraduate course work in the following areas: statistics, human biology, political science, sociology, economics and psychology.

In addition to three letters of recommendation the applicant must submit a personal statement that speaks to her/his commitment to social and economic justice as well as the applicant's professional goals over the next 10 years. Since the program is not designed to prepare graduates for work in private practice, an applicant indicating that private practice is his/her professional goal will be advised to consider other programs, such as counselor education at UT that will be better suited to meet this goal.

The personal statement and references from both employers and prior faculty members will be evaluated for a �fit� with the social work profession and our program's focus on social and economic justice. Applicants must convey their adherence to the values and ethics of the profession. Applicants with no evidence of the above will not be admitted to the program.

The Council on Social Work Education does not permit programs to provide course credit for work experience. It is our hope that each class admitted would have a mixture of students who have experience as well as those without extensive professional experience. However, this will not be a condition of admission.

We encourage diversity among the students accepted to the program. This includes diversity of gender, age, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, ability and experience in the profession, etc. Prospective applicants are urged to review information on the department web site at http://www.utoledo.edu/hshs/socialwork/.

Advanced Standing Program
In addition to the admission criteria established by the College of Graduate Studies at The University of Toledo, the applicant applying for regular admission to the advanced standing program must meet the following requirements: hold a baccalaureate degree in social work from a CSW-accredited social work program, have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0, and have a minimum GPA of 3.3 in the social work major. Additionally, the personal statement and references will be evaluated on the same basis as listed under the MSW Program.

Degree Requirements for the Master in Social Work
The complete MSW Program requires 60 semester hours for graduation that is consistent with MSW programs across the country. Foundation course work is offered in the first year of the program and advanced course work in the second year.

Students must enroll in 16 credit hours of field education to obtain the required 900 hours required by CSWE. Six of these hours are taken during the foundation year and ten at the advanced year. While every effort is made to accommodate students with full-time jobs, applicants to the program must be aware that field placements primarily take place during business hours. We are unable to guarantee a night or weekend field placement.

Students who are awarded advanced standing complete 33 credit hours to obtain the MSW degree. The advanced standing program focuses on the advanced generalist courses and field placements. Courses at the 6000 level are required for the advanced stranding program.
Required Core Courses
SOCW 5010 Social Work Research and Analysis
SOCW 5110 Social Work Practice I
SOCW 5120 Social Work Practice II
SOCW 5130 Social Work Practice III
SOCW 5210 Micro Social Work Perspectives on Human Behavior in the Social Environment
SOCW 5220 Macro Social Work Perspectives on Human Behavior in the Social Environment
SOCW 5330 Policy Issues and Analysis in Social Work
SOCW 5990 Foundation Social Work Field Lab
SOCW 5910 Foundation Social Work Field Placement
SOCW 6110 Advanced Generalist Practice I
SOCW 6120 Advanced Generalist Practice II
SOCW 6130 Advanced Generalist Practice III
SOCW 6140 Advanced Social Work Assessment
SOCW 6900 Advanced Social Work Field Experience I
SOCW 6910 Advanced Social Work Field Experience II
Concentration Courses (8 hours)
Child and Family Services Concentration
SOCW 6410 Child and Family Social Work Practice
SOCW 6430 Social Work Policy Issues: Child and Family Services
SOCW 6460 Social Work Journal Review Seminar I: Child and Family Services
SOCW 6470 Social Work Journal Review Seminar II: Child and Family Services
Mental Health Services Concentration
SOCW 6510 Social Work Practice in Mental Health
SOCW 6530 Social Work Policy Issues in Mental Health
SOCW 6560 Social Work Journal Review Seminar I: Mental Health Practice
SOCW 6570 Social Work Journal Review Seminar II: Mental Health Practice
Advanced Research Elective (3 hours)
SOCW 6030 Research Methods for Macro Social Work Practice
SOCW 6040 Research Methods for Micro Social Work Practice
Total: 60 semester hours Advanced Standing: 33 semester hours

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Department of Legal Specialities

Kathleen Mercer Reed, chair

The Elder Law Certificate is an online graduate certificate consisting of 15 credit hours. Students are admitted for the summer semester and must complete an application by April 1st. A minimum of 3.0 undergraduate grade point average is required as well as two letter of recommendation.

The program of study consists course offered in summer and fall semesters.
LGL 6100 Legal Issues for the Elderly
LGL 6200 Elder Health Law and Ethical Issues
LGL 6980 Guide Study in Elder Law Topics
GERO 540 Health and Aging
GERO 541 Issues in Contemporary Gerontological Practice

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Last Updated: 3/23/15