Provost's Office

College of Medicine 2009-2010 Graduate Catalog

 

Print Version

 


College of Medicine
 
Graduate Programs

The College of Medicine at the University of Toledo offers several graduate-level degree and certificate programs.  PhD and MS degrees in biomedical sciences and academic certificates are offered in several basic science and clinical tracks. In addition, MPH and MS degrees in public health and related academic certificates are offered in several applied science, health promotion, and nutrition tracks.

Admission to Graduate Programs

Admission requirements for College of Graduate Studies are discussed in a prior section of the College of Graduate Studies section of this catalog; other admission procedures are described under the individual graduate programs. Admission to graduate study in the College of Medicine is open to graduates of accredited colleges and universities meeting the minimum admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies as well as specific admission requirements of the department and/or program. Previously admitted students wishing to transfer to a different department or program must apply for admission to that new department or program. Admission to one program does not guarantee admission to another program. Please refer to the degree program descriptions for specific information.

Administration of Programs

All graduate programs in the College of Medicine are administered jointly by the college and the College of Graduate Studies of The University of Toledo. Students may contact specific departments, the college’s graduate advisor, or the College of Graduate Studies for further information on programs or admission requirements. Student should be aware that course names/credit hours may be revised over the course of the program per the department requirements.  Please consult with your department regarding course/credit hour changes.

Advising

Students must meet with their faculty advisor for the purpose of developing a plan of study. It is the student’s responsibility to meet all requirements for the degree as specified by the graduate program, the department, the College of Graduate Studies and the University of Toledo. Students are encouraged to complete the plan of study during the first semester of matriculation.

page top


Graduate Degrees Offered

Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Science

Cancer Biology
Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases
Infection, Immunity, and Transplantation
Neurosciences and Neurological Disorders 

Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Engineering (see College of Engineering)

Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences

Bioinformatics and Proteomics/Genomics
Cancer Biology
Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases
Infection, Immunity, and Transplantation
Neurosciences and Neurological Disorders
Human Donation Sciences
Medical Physics
Medical Sciences
Oral Biology
Orthopedic Sciences
Physician Assistant Studies

Master of Public Health

Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety Science
Health Promotion and Education
Public Health Administration
Public Health Epidemiology
Public Health Nutrition 

Master of Science in Occupational Health

Industrial Hygiene

Dual Degrees

Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy in Medical Sciences
Doctor of Medicine and Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences
Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health 

Graduate Certificates

Bioinformatics Proteomics/Genomics Certificate
Certificate in Anatomic Pathology
Certificate in Biostatistics and Epidemiology
Certificate in Contemporary Gerontological Practice
Certificate in Epidemiology
Certificate in Global Public Health
Certificate in Medical and Health Science Teaching and Learning
Certificate in Occupational Health
Certificate in Public Health and Emergency Response
Certificate Pathology for Post Second Year Medical Students Certificate

Biomedical Sciences:  Ph.D. and Masters Programs

Accreditation

Graduate programs are accredited either by discipline-specific accrediting agencies or by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association.

General Admission Standards 

To be admitted to the Ph.D. or Masters in Biomedical Sciences Program with Regular status, applicants must hold an earned baccalaureate (or equivalent) from an accredited college or university, and have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.  Typically, applicants will have an undergraduate major in Biology or a related discipline. In addition, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores of 1100 (combined Verbal and Quantitative scores) and 4.5 (Analytical Writing Test) are recommended for some programs.  For international applicants, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the (IELTS) also is required and a score above the 50th percentile is recommended.  However, a prior Masters degree is not required to enter the Ph.D. program.  At this time, all students accepted unconditionally into the Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences program will receive a full tuition scholarship and a research stipend.  The research stipend is similar in monetary value to the National Institutes of Health, National Research Award for predoctoral fellows.  There are a limited number of tuition scholarships and stipends available for students in the Masters in Biomedical Sciences program.

Bioinformatics and Proteomics/Genomics

Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology
Robert Blumenthal, Ph.D., director

Masters, Certificate and Dual Degree Programs

The program in Bioinformatics and Proteomics/Genomics at the University of Toledo offers a Certificate in association with the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) or Doctor of Medicine (M.D.). BPG also offers a Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences (MSBS). The Certificate program is designed to fit smoothly into the existing doctoral programs, with minimal extra time required. MSBS students follow a well-defined program that includes core courses, journal club, seminars, independent research, and electives in the area of interest. Both Certificate and MSBS students are trained in the theory, methods and applications of bioinformatics, proteomics, and genomics.

Bioinformatics programs generally place more emphasis on either the computer science or the biomedical aspects of the field. UT’s program falls into the latter category. However, there are courses in PERL, Java, and SQL programming (for example), and the Program provides biomedical researchers with a solid introduction to the computational aspects, or computer science experts with a rigorous introduction to the biomedical aspects of bioinformatics.

Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences: Bioinformatics and Proteomics/Genomics

To be admitted to the Ph.D. or Masters in Biomedical Sciences Program with Regular status, applicants must hold an earned baccalaureate (or equivalent) from an accredited college or university.  Students with a GPA under 3.0, but at or above 2.5, may apply for conditional acceptance that would change to regular (non-probationary) status, if their first term graduate coursework has a GPA of 3.0 or above.  Typically, applicants will have an undergraduate major in Biology or a related discipline such as Biochemistry or Biophysics.  Students with other majors such as Chemistry or Physics are encouraged to apply; however, their coursework should include several semesters in biology. In addition, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are required. Minimum scores of  1050 (combined Verbal and Quantitative scores) and 3.5 (Analytical Writing Test) are preferred.  For international applicants, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is also required. Scores must be 550 or higher for paper-administered version, 213 or higher for computer -administered version, and 80 or higher for Internet-administered version.  For all applicants, laboratory research or computer programming experience is preferred.  There are a limited number of tuition scholarships and stipends available for students in the Masters in Biomedical Sciences program.  Students who are Ohio residents may apply for the Choose Ohio First Scholarship in Bioinformatics (tuition only).

Fall 1 (12.5 credits)

Course                    Course Name                               Credit Hours               # Weeks

BMSP634               Genes & Genomes                                2.5                            8
BIPG520/720          Statistical Methods in BPG                    3                              8
BIPG510/710          Fundamentals in BPG                            3                             16
BMSP638               Methods in Biomedical Sciences           1                              8
INDI602                 On Being A Scientist                             1                             12
BIPG580                 Intro to Biomedical Research                 0                              8
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research                                2                              8

                                                                                                               (2x4 wk lab rotations)

Spring 1 (12 credits)

Course                    Course Name                               Credit Hours               # Weeks

BIPG610/710         Bioinformatic Computation                     3                              16
BIPG640/840          Applications of BPG                               3                              16
BMSP635               Cell Biology & Signaling                        3                              16
Elective 1                                                                                 3                              16 

Sum 1 (9 credits)

Course                    Course Name                               Credit Hours               # Weeks

BIPG511/711          Practical Bioinformatics                          1                              4
BIPG540/740          Bioinformatic Databases                         1                              4
BIPG550/750          Microarray Analysis                               1                              4
BIPG590                 Research in BPG                                     6                              12 

Fall 2 (12credits)

Course                    Course Name                               Credit Hours               # Weeks

Elective 2                                                                                 3                              16
                                Journal Club in BPG                               1                              16
BIPG590                 Research Project in BPG                         8                              16 

Summary

Grade Type                                  Credit Hours

Didactic (non-elective)                     21.5
Research                                              16
Electives                                                6
S/U                                                        2

Total:                                                45.5


Certificate in Bioinformatics

The Bioinformatics and Proteomics/Genomics (BPG) Certificate Program introduces students to the newly evolving fields of bioinformatics, proteomics and genomics, and provides a core knowledge of analytical approaches used in these fields.  The curriculum is designed to complement coursework and research of students enrolled in the University of Toledo Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences Program, but also is open to other qualified students.  The Program is a joint effort of the University of Toledo Main and Health Science Campuses and Bowling Green State University.  

Students enrolled in the BPG Certificate Program must take four courses covering the following subject areas:

1.   Introduction to the scope of bioinformatics, proteomics and genomics: "Fundamentals of BPG"

2.   Training in statistical methods used in BPG: "Statistical Methods in Bioinformatics"

3.   Handling and manipulation of databases and introduction to computer programming skills needed to manipulate large quantities of nucleic acid and protein sequence data: "Introduction to Bioinformatic Computation"

4.   Applications of BPG, in which faculty members using these methods will discuss and demonstrate how these techniques are utilized to solve research problems:  "Applications of BPG"

Upon completion of the Program, students will be prepared to utilize BPG research techniques and be able to interact with specialists in each BPG subdiscipline.

 

Curriculum

The curriculum consists of four, 3-credit courses (listed below that can be taken over 1-4 y):

Fall Year 1
Course                    Course Name                                                                                                          Credit Hours

BIPG510/710          Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Proteomics/Genomics                                                    3
BIPG520/720          Statistical Methods in Bioinformatics                                                                                      3

Spring Year 1

Course                    Course Name                                                                                                          Credit Hours

BIPG610/810          Introduction to Bioinformatic Computation                                                                             3
BIPG620/820          Application of Bioinformatics and Proteomics/Genomics                                                       3

*BMSP634 Current Problems & Research Approaches in Genes and Genomes, or equivalent course approved by the BPG Program, is required for admission into the BPG Certificate Program.

NOTE:  Currently enrolled UT Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences or MSBS students may take individual BPG courses as electives, with permission of the instructor.  To receive a Certificate in Bioinformatics, an online application must be submitted and accepted. 

All applications will be reviewed by the BPG Program Admissions Committee.  Electronic, online application must be filed ONLY for those seeking a certificate, as opposed to taking these courses as electives.

Applying to the BPG Certificate Program:

Applicants must submit the following after applying online:

1.   Official transcripts

2.   GRE score

3.   Statement of purpose

4.   Three letters of recommendation are optional, but, in the event that a student decides to pursue the BPG MSBS degree, it will save time to have the letters of recommendation already on file.

MD/MSBS Bioinformatics Degree

This is designed for students already in our MD program, who want preparation for clinical research in gene therapy, biomarker discovery, or other aspects of cutting-edge medicine.  It involves one year of coursework and research between the 2nd and 3rd years of the standard medical curriculum.

Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Science: Cancer Biology Track

 

page top


Department of Biochemistry & Cancer Biology

William A. Maltese, Ph.D., chair

Randall J. Ruch, Ph.D., MPH, track director

The Cancer Biology track within the Ph.D. and M.S. in Biomedical Science program at the University of Toledo fosters young scientists to become cutting-edge researchers who understand the molecular genetic basis of cancer and to develop better therapies for the disease.  Students in the Cancer Biology track develop scientific thinking and laboratory skills to approach cancer research questions in ways that will best lead to success.  Graduates of the Cancer Biology program move on to become successful scientists and leaders in academic, government, and industrial research settings.

Cancer Biology Ph.D. and M.S. students enroll in a first-year core curriculum that is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge for cutting edge research.  The first-year curriculum provides students with a comprehensive overview of molecular and cellular biology, systems pathophysiology, modern research methodology, and statistical analysis.  In addition, students complete laboratory rotations during the first two semesters to identify a Cancer Biology major advisor and laboratory for their thesis or dissertation research project.  Ph.D. students complete three rotations and then may join a Cancer Biology laboratory after the Spring semester of their first year.  M.S. students complete one rotation and may join a lab the beginning of Spring semester of the first year.  In year two and beyond, students take advanced courses, journal clubs, and seminars in Cancer Biology, but primarily focus on their thesis or dissertation research.  Students in good academic standing may be supported financially by a full tuition scholarship and stipend during their academic training.  This financial assistance does not require the student to be a Teaching Associate for undergraduates, thus enabling the student to more fully concentrate on his/her graduate program.  However, teaching experiences can be arranged if a student desires that.  Cancer Biology Ph.D. students generally complete the degree in approximately five years, whereas M.S. students average about 2.5 years.

Most faculty in the Cancer Biology track are members of the Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology in the College of Medicine at the University of Toledo.  Other faculty are members of other departments within the College of Medicine or other colleges of the university.  The laboratory facilities and shared equipment utilized by Cancer Biology faculty are state of the art. 

Ph.D. Program Students: Year 1

Fall Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

                                Introduction to Biomedical Research                      0
Current Problems and Research Approaches (CPRA) in... 
BMSP633/833        CPRA in Protein Structure and Catalysis             2.5
BMSP634/834        CPRA in Genes and Genomes                             2.5
BMSP636/836        CPRA in Cell Membranes                                     3
BMSP638/838        Methods in Biomedical Sciences                            3
INDI602/802          "On Being a Scientist"                                           1
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research (one 8 week lab rotation)        3 

Total                                                                                                      15

Spring Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

BMSP631/831        Systems Pathophysiology I                                    3
BMSP632/832        Systems Pathophysiology II                                  2
BMSP635/835        CPRA in Cell Biology and Signaling                     3
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research (two 8 week lab rotations)      6
BMSP637/837        Recent Adv in BMS Journal Club                         1 

Total                                                                                                      15

Summer Term 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PUBH532               Statistical Methods I (required BMS core course)    3
CABP673/873        Research in CABP                                               0-8
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research (additional rotations possible) 0-8  

Total                                                                                                      11

Ph.D. Program Students: Year 2

Fall Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

CABP627/827        Advanced Cancer Biology
(or take this course in third year)                                                          3
CABP689/889        Independent Study in Cancer Biology                 0-15
and/or
CABP  673/873      Research in CABP                                              0-15
and/or
Electives                                                                                             0-15

Total                                                                                                      15

Spring Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

CABP 656/856       Readings in Cancer Biology                                    1
CABP689/889        Independent Study in Cancer Biology                 0-14
and/or                                                                                                                                                                                     
CABP  673/873      Research in CABP                                              0-14
and/or
Electives                                                                                              0-14

Total                                                                                                      15

Summer

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

CABP689/889        Independent Study in Cancer Biology                 0-11
and/or                                                                                                                                                                                     
CABP  673/873      Research in CABP                                              0-11
and/or
Electives                                                                                             0-11

Total                                                                                                      11 

Second Year Qualifying Examination (successful completion required in Spring or Summer semester)

Ph.D. Program Students: Year 3

Fall Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

INDI999                 Dissertation Research                                         12-15
CABP627/827        Advanced Cancer Biology
(if not taken in second year)                                                                 3

Total                                                                                                      15

Spring

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

INDI999                 Dissertation Research                                            14
CABP656/856        Readings in Cancer Biology                                    1

Total                                                                                                      15

Summer

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

INDI999                 Dissertation Research                                            11

Third Year Student Seminar (required in Fall or Spring semester)

Ph.D. Program Students: Year 4 and above

Fall, Spring and Summer                                           All Dissertation Research (INDI 999)

The Ph.D. Qualifying Exam is taken In the Spring semester or Summer term of the second year.  Prior to completing the exam, students should carry out their dissertation research under the course Research in CABP (673/873) or Independent Study in CABP (689/889).  After passing the Qualifying Exam, students conduct their research under the course Dissertation Research (INDI999).  A minimum of 30 credits of Dissertation Research are required to graduate.

All Ph.D. students are also required to present a seminar on their research in the third year.  They are also required to present posters in the annual UTHSC Graduate Student Research Forums and oral presentations in the annual Larry Gentry Research Symposia beginning in their second year.

Master of Science in Biomedical Science:  Cancer Biology Track

M.S. Program Students: Year 1

Fall Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

                                Introduction to Biomedical Research                      0
Current Problems and Research Approaches (CPRA) in... 
BMSP633/833        CPRA in Protein Structure and Catalysis             2.5
BMSP634/834        CPRA in Genes and Genomes                             2.5
BMSP636/836        CPRA in Cell Membranes                                     3
BMSP638/838        Methods in Biomedical Sciences                            3
INDI602/802          "On Being a Scientist"                                           1
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research (one 8 week lab rotation)        3 

Total                                                                                                      15

 

Spring Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

BMSP635/835        CPRA in Cell Biology and Signaling (required)    3
BMSP637/837        Recent Adv in BMS Journal Club (required)         1
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research (2 additional rotations possible)   6 
             and/or        
BMSP631/831        Systems Pathophysiology I (optional)                   3
                                and/or
BMSP632/832        Systems Pathophysiology II (optional)                  2 
                                and/or
CABP689/889        Independent Study in Cancer Biology (optional) 0-11
                                and/or
CABP  673/873      Research in CABP (optional)                              0-11
                                and/or
                                Electives (optional)                                              0-11
 
Total                                                                                                      15

Summer Term 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PUBH532               Statistical Methods I (required)                              3
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research 
                                (2 additional rotations possible)                             6
                                and/or
CABP689/889        Independent Study in Cancer Biology (optional)  0-6
                                and/or
CABP  673/873      Research in CABP (optional)                                 0-6
                                and/or
                                Electives (optional)                                                 0-6

Total                                                                                                       9

First Year Qualifying Examination (successful completion required in Summer term)

M.S. Program Students: Year 2

Fall Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

CABP627/827        Advanced Cancer Biology 
                                   (or take this course in third year)                         3
INDI699                 Thesis Research                                                   0-15
                                and/or
                                Electives                                                              0-15

Total                                                                                                      15 

Spring Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

CABP 656/856       Readings in Cancer Biology                                   1
                                and/or
INDI699                 Thesis Research                                                   0-14
                                and/or
                                Electives                                                              0-14

Total                                                                                                      15

Summer Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

INDI699                 Thesis Research                                                    0-9
                                and/or
                                Electives                                                               0-9

Total                                                                                                        9

M.S. Program Students: Year 3 

Fall Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

INDI699                 Thesis Research                                                   0-15
                                and/or
                                Electives                                                              0-15

Total                                                                                                      15

Spring Term

INDI699                 Thesis Research                                                   0-15
                                and/or
                                Electives                                                              0-15

Total                                                                                                      15

Summer Term

INDI699                 Thesis Research                                                     9 

The M.S. Qualifying Exam is taken in the Summer term of the first year.  Prior to completing the exam, students should carry out their thesis research under the course Research in CABP (673/873) or Independent Study in CABP (689/889).  After passing the Qualifying Exam, students conduct their research under the course Thesis Research (INDI699).  A minimum of 10 credits of Thesis Research are required to graduate.

All M.S. students are also required to present posters in the annual UTHSC Graduate Student Research Forums and oral presentations in the annual Larry Gentry Research Symposia beginning in their second year.

Advanced Courses in the Cancer Biology Track

Advanced Cancer Biology

A comprehensive examination of the cellular and molecular foundation of cancer.  Topics to be covered include: neoplasia; epidemiology and etiology; the role of causative agents such as chemicals, radiation, and viruses; cell proliferation, injury, and death; oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; and an overview of cancer therapy. 

Readings in Cancer Biology

A readings and discussion course that will examine classic and current research publications from within the broad realm of cancer biology.

Independent Study in Cancer Biology

In-depth study of research areas chosen by individual faculty.  Examples of such topics may be: gene therapy of cancer, drug therapy and resistance, hormonal carcinogenesis, epigenetic mechanisms of oncogenesis.

Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Science:  Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Track

 

page top

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology

Nader G. Abraham, Ph.D., chair

Andrew Beavis, Ph.D., track director

The Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases track in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Education program at the UT College of Medicine on the Health Science Campus nurtures students and provides them with the necessary tools to pursue an independent career in biomedical sciences.  The program encompasses a unique interdisciplinary approach to train students to conduct research in the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases that have profound impact on human health.

The program draws on faculty research strengths in signal transduction, genetics, molecular and cellular biology, gene microarrays, genomics, proteomics, gene knockout and transgenics, tissue culture, and protein and carbohydrate biochemistry.  The CVMD faculty members are not only drawn from its associated department, the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and the Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research (CeDER), but also from other departments including the Departments of Medicine, Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Orthopedics, Neurosciences and Urology.  Modern, well-equipped research facilities are available through the participating departments.  The CVMD program offers degrees of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and MS in biomedical sciences (MSBS).  The program also offers these graduate degrees in combination with the Medical Degree (MD) that is offered by the medical school.  Students from the four programs, PhD, MSBS, MD/PhD and MD/MSBS, follow a well-defined program that includes core courses, journal clubs, seminars, laboratory rotations, independent research, and electives in the area of interest.  Students select faculty advisors and begin their independent dissertation research following the laboratory rotations in the biomedical science core curriculum.  The curriculum is designed to enable students, guided by their advisors, to develop the expertise that prepares them for a successful career in research and education

Ph.D. Program Students: Year 1

Fall Term (all are required)

Biomedical Sciences Program Core Requirements

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

                                Introduction to Biomedical Research                      0
Current Problems and Research Approaches (CPRA) in...
BMSP633/833        CPRA in Protein Structure and Catalysis             2.5
BMSP634/834        CPRA in Genes and Genomes                             2.5
BMSP636/836        CPRA in Cell Membranes                                     3
BMSP638/838        Methods in Biomedical Sciences                            3
INDI602/802          "On Being a Scientist"                                           1
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research                                                3
                                (one 8 week lab rotation)

Total                                                                                                      15

Spring Term  (all are required)

Biomedical Sciences Program Core Requirements

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

BMSP631/831        Systems Pathophysiology I                                    3
BMSP632/832        Systems Pathophysiology II                                  2
BMSP635/835        CPRA in Cell Biology and Signaling                     3
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research (two 8 week lab rotations)      6
CVMD660/860       Journal Paper Review in CVMD                           1 

 Total                                                                                                     15

Summer Term 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PUBH532              Statistical Methods I, 
                                     (required BMS core course)                              3
CVMD673/873      Research in CVMD                                              0-8
BMSP639/839       Mentored Research 
                                     (additional rotations are possible)                    0-8 

Total                                                                                                      11

 Ph.D. Program Students: Year 2 And Beyond

In addition to the BMS core requirements, PhD students in the CVMD track will be required to take the following courses to graduate:

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

CVMD630/830       Seminars in CVMD                                               1
                                     (required for students in their 2nd, 3rd  and 4th years)
CVMD650/850       Advanced Topics in CVMD                                  3
CVMD660/860       Journal Paper Review in CVMD                           1
                                     (required by students in their 2nd and 3rd years)
BMSP625/825        Grant Writing Workshop                                       2

Advanced electives in CVMD or other areas to make up the required number of didactic credit hours.

The Ph.D. Candidacy (Qualifying) Exam is taken at the end of the second year.

Prior to passing this exam, the student carries out their research under the course Research in CVMD (CVMD 673/873, 1-15 cr) or in some cases Independent Study in CVMD (CVMD 689/889).   After passing the Ph.D. Candidacy Exam, the student carries out their research under the course Dissertation Research (CVMD 999).  A minimum of 30 credits of Dissertation Research are required for graduation.

Senior students will also be required to present a seminar describing their work as part of the CVMD track seminar series.  All students will also be expected to present a poster in the UTHSC Research Forum and present a poster or oral presentation at the CVMD Student Research Forum and the Pharmacology Research Colloquium.  The Pharmacology Research Colloquium is held on a rotating basis at UT HSC, Michigan State University, the University of Michigan and Wayne State University.  It is an annual event in which the students of “pharmacology” departments at the respective Medical Schools have participated in since 1973.  These events provide students with excellent opportunities for developing skills in organizing, presenting and discussing their work.

Master of Science in Biomedical Science:  Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Track

Masters Program Students: Year 1

Fall Term (all are required)

Biomedical Sciences Program Core Requirements 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

                                Introduction to Biomedical Research                      0
Current Problems and Research Approaches (CPRA) in...
BMSP633/833        CPRA in Protein Structure and Catalysis             2.5
BMSP634/834        CPRA in Genes and Genomes                             2.5
BMSP636/836        CPRA in Cell Membranes                                     3
BMSP638/838        Methods in Biomedical Sciences                            3
INDI602/802          "On Being a Scientist"                                           1
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research                                                3
                                (one 8 week lab rotation)

Total                                                                                                                        15

Spring Term (all are required)

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

CVMD660/860       Journal Paper Review in CVMD                           1
BMSP631/831        Systems Pathophysiology I, or                              3
BMSP635/835        CPRA in Cell Biology and Signaling                     3
                                Electives                                                              0-12
CVMD673/873      Research in CVMD                                             0-12
BMSP639/839       Mentored Research                                               0-6
                                (1 or 2 rotations if needed)

 Total                                                                                                  12-15

Summer Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PUBH532               Statistical Methods I,                                              3
                                     (required BMS core course)                              
CVMD673/873       Research in CVMD                                              0-8
 BMSP639/839       Mentored Research 
                                     (additional rotations are possible)                    0-6 

 Total                                                                                                      9

Masters Program Students: Year 2 And Beyond

In addition to the BMS core requirements, MSBS students in the CVMD track will be required to take the following courses:

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

BMSP631/831        Systems Pathophysiology I                                    3
                                     (if not taken in year 1) or
BMSP635/835        CPRA in Cell Biology and Signaling                       
                                     (if not taken in year 1)                                       3
CVMD630/830       Seminars in CVMD                                               1 
                                     (required for students in their 2nd year)
CVMD660/860       Journal Paper Review in CVMD                           1 
                                     (required by students in their 2nd year)  

Advanced electives in CVMD or other areas to make up the required number of didactic credit hours.

The MS Candidacy (Qualifying) Exam is taken at the end of the first year.

 A minimum of 10 credits of Thesis Research (CVMD 699/899) are required for graduation.

Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Science:  Infection, Immunity, and Transplantation Track

 

page top

Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology

Akira Takashima, Ph.D., M.D., chair

Z. Kevin Pan, Ph.D., Track Director

The Infection, Immunity and Transplantation training program at the University of Toledo on the Health Science Campus offers the Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D., and M.S.B.S. degrees through the interdisciplinary degree programs in Medical Sciences. The primary goal of the doctoral program in Infection, Immunity and Transplantation is to train students for independent, creative careers in research and/or teaching. The curriculum for the Ph.D. degree consists of a core of concentrated course work in the first year, followed by specialized elective courses and an emphasis on laboratory research. Elective courses are offered in advanced immunity, microbiology of human infections, advanced virology and cellular and molecular biology of pathogenic bacteria. Other training activities include an annual combined journal club and seminar course (current topics in IIT), participation in annual IIT student research forums and graduate school student poster forums, presentation of a formal third-year seminar to track faculty and students, and the completion of a written dissertation or thesis and its oral defense.  Students also are encouraged to present their findings at local, national and international meetings in their fields.

During the first two semesters, each student rotates through three research laboratories, conducting short-term projects, gaining exposure to techniques and identifying potential areas for further investigation. At the end of the second semester, each student selects a major advisor who directs the student's doctoral research. A faculty advisory committee is also jointly chosen by the student and advisor to supervise academic progress toward completion of the Ph.D. degree.

IIT required and elective courses:

Course                    Course Name                                                                               Credit Hours

IITP 603/803           Current Topics in IIT                                                                             1

The course includes attendance at biweekly seminars given by invited speakers and on an alternating biweekly basis the presentation of papers related to the seminar topics. May be repeated for credit.

IITP 602/802           Advanced Immunology                                                                          

Student led discussion of recent literature supporting key concepts in the human immune response. Discussions will focus on how current research impacts our understanding of specific responses.

MICB 689/889        Independent Study in Medical Microbiology and Immunology          1-15

Intensive study in a field of interest, including theoretical and experimental work. May be repeated for credit.

MICB 620/820        Microbiology of Human Infections                                                        3

The course provides a broad survey of bacteria, viruses and fungi causing human infections by lecture, lab exercises and review of current scientific literature. 

IITP 601/801           IIT Systems Pathophysiology                                                                2

A mini course that presents current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of selected microbes and the impact of the immune system on disease and its prevention.

Ph.D. Program Students:  Year 1

Fall Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

                                Introduction to Biomedical Research                      0
Current Problems and Research Approaches (CPRA) in... 
BMSP633/833        CPRA in Protein Structure and Catalysis             2.5
BMSP634/834        CPRA in Genes and Genomes                             2.5
BMSP636/836        CPRA in Cell Membranes                                     3
BMSP638/838        Methods in Biomedical Sciences                            3
INDI602/802          "On Being a Scientist"                                           1
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research 
                                   (one 8 week lab rotation)                                    3 

Total                                                                                                      15

Spring Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

BMSP631/831        Systems Pathophysiology I                                    3
BMSP632/832        Systems Pathophysiology II                                  2
BMSP635/835        CPRA in Cell Biology and Signaling                     3
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research                                                6
                                   (two 8 week lab rotations)
IITP603/803            Current Topics IIT                                                 1  

 Total                                                                                                     15

Summer Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PUBH532               Statistical Methods I, 
                                     (required BMS core course)                              3
CVMD673/873       Research in IIT                                                     0-8
 BMSP639/839       Mentored Research 
                                     (additional rotations are possible)                    0-8 

 Total                                                                                                     11

Master of Science in Biomedical Science:  Infection, Immunity, and Transplantation Track

The IIT track participates in the masters in biomedical sciences training program.  Students are expected to complete a core curriculum similar to that of doctoral students but with some of the courses as elective offerings, to experience one or more rotations before selecting a major advisor and thesis laboratory.  In addition to 40 credit hours in didactic and other courses, students are required to successful pass a candidacy exam and to write and defend a research thesis. Students usually complete the degree requirements in 2-3 years.

MSBS Program Students:  Year 1

Fall Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

                                Introduction to Biomedical Research                      0
Current Problems and Research Approaches (CPRA) in... 
BMSP633/833        CPRA in Protein Structure and Catalysis             2.5
BMSP634/834        CPRA in Genes and Genomes                             2.5
BMSP636/836        CPRA in Cell Membranes                                     3
BMSP638/838        Methods in Biomedical Sciences                            3
INDI602/802          "On Being a Scientist"                                           1
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research 
                                (one 8 week lab rotation)                                       3 

Total                                                                                                      15

Spring Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

IITP603                   Current Topics IIT                                                 1
BMSP633               Introduction to IIT                                                  2 
                                Electives                                                              0-12
IITP699                   Research in IITR                                                 0-12
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research                                               0-6 
                                (1 or 2 rotations if needed)

Total                                                                                                   12-15  

Summer Term

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PUBH532               Biostatistics (required)                                           3
IITP699                   Research in IITR                                                  0-6
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research 
                                     (additional rotations are possible)                    0-6

Total                                                                                                       9  

Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Science:  Neuroscience and Neurological Disorders Track

 

page top

Department of Neurosciences

Bryan Yamamoto, Ph.D., chair

Nicolas Chiaia, Ph.D., track director

The combination of molecular biology and genetics with modern neuroanatomical techniques is transforming both our ability to examine and to understand the nervous system. Ongoing research by the faculty in the Neurosciences and Neurological Disorders graduate program is providing insights into neurotransmission, sensory system function, development and plasticity of the nervous system, regeneration and repair following neural damage, the basis of neural disease, and behavior. As one of four biomedical science degree programs in the UT College of Medicine, the Neurosciences and Neurological Disorders program is an interdisciplinary course of studies whose primary goal is to train students for independent, creative careers in biomedical research and/or teaching. The program awards both Ph.D. and M.S. degrees and participates in the M.D./Ph.D. and M.D./M.S.B.S. joint degree programs.

Nationally-recognized, NIH-funded Neuroscience faculty who serve as research mentors are drawn from a number of departments including: Neurosciences, Neurology, Physiology and Pharmacology, Otolaryngology, Psychiatry and Radiation Therapy.  Modern, state-of-the-art research laboratory and core facilities are available through the program and these participating departments.

The Neurosciences and Neurological Disorders training program at the University of Toledo on the Health Science Campus offers the Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D., and M.S.B.S. degrees through the interdisciplinary degree programs in Medical Sciences. The primary goal of the doctoral program in Neurosciences and Neurological Disorders is to train students for independent, creative careers in research and/or teaching. The curriculum for the Ph.D. degree consists of a core of concentrated course work in the first year, followed by specialized elective courses and an emphasis on laboratory research. Elective courses are offered in developmental and systems neuroscience, as well as ion channel function, sensory physiology, and neuropharmacology. During the first two semesters, each student rotates through four research laboratories, conducting short-term projects, gaining exposure to techniques and identifying potential areas for further investigation. At the end of the second semester, each student selects a major advisor who directs the student's doctoral research. A faculty committee is also jointly chosen by the student and advisor to supervise academic progress toward completion of the Ph.D. degree.

Ph.D. Program Students:  Year 1

Fall Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

                                Introduction to Biomedical Research                      0
Current Problems and Research Approaches (CPRA) in... 
BMSP633/833        CPRA in Protein Structure and Catalysis             2.5
BMSP634/834        CPRA in Genes and Genomes                             2.5
BMSP636/836        CPRA in Cell Membranes                                     3
BMSP638/838        Methods in Biomedical Sciences                            3
INDI602/802          "On Being a Scientist"                                           1
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research 
                                (one 8 week lab rotation)                                       3

Total                                                                                                      15

Spring Term (all are required) 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

BMSP631/831        Systems Pathophysiology I                                    3
BMSP632/832        Systems Pathophysiology II                                  2
BMSP635/835        CPRA in Cell Biology and Signaling                     3
BMSP639/839        Mentored Research                                                6
                                (two 8 week lab rotations)
BMSP637/837        Recent Adv BMS Journal Club                             1

Total                                                                                                     15

Summer Term 

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

 PUBH532              Statistical Methods I, 
                                     (required BMS core course)                              3
 NNDP673/873       Research in NNDP                                               0-8
 BMSP639/839       Mentored Research 
                                     (additional rotations are possible)                    0-8 

Total                                                                                                      11

Track or Major Courses

Spring Semester   

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

NND650/850          Seminar in Neuroscience                                        0
NND654/854          Journal Paper Review in Neurosciences                1
BMS603/803          Journal paper review                                              1

Elective Courses 

Fall Semester   

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

BIOE4720/5620      Cellular Electrophysiology                                     3
NND689/889          Independent study in Neuroscience                     1-15
NND656/856          Readings in Neuroscience
NND672/872          Current Topics in Neuroscience                           1-5

Spring Semester   

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

BMSP625/825        Grant Writing Workshop                                       2
NND581/781          Neuroscience                                                          6
NND689/889          Independent study in Neuroscience                     1-15
NND656/856          Readings in Neuroscience
NND672/872          Current Topics in Neuroscience                           1-5  

                                Basic principles of Pharmacology                          1

INDI679/879.         Microscopy Techniques I: Basic and Advanced Light Microscopy:
INDI686/886.         Microscopy Techniques II: Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy: 
                                Neuropharmacology

Research Courses

Fall - Spring and Summer Semester   

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

NND699/899          Research in Neuroscience                                    1-15
INDI999                 Dissertation Research (30 min)                           1-15

Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences:  Human Donation Science

The Human Donation Science Master Degree program is designed to provide entry-level professional preparation for individuals who wish to become an organ procurement transplant coordinator. Organ procurement coordinators facilitate the organ donation process from beginning to end. They are the liaisons between the donor’s family, the coroner, the medical and nursing staff, the organ procurement organization and ultimately the transplant surgeon. As a result, coordinators must skillfully and diplomatically deal with a number of issues, agendas and personalities in order to achieve a successful organ transplant.

Entrance requirements/prerequisites?

·         Baccalaureate degree from a school that is accredited by a nationally recognized body for accreditation of postsecondary education.
•          Overall grade point average of 3.0 in undergraduate work.
•          Submission of online UT Health Science Campus Graduate School Application.
•          Three letters of recommendation (using UT forms).
·         A minimum of two semesters of coursework in the biological sciences, a minimum of two semesters of coursework in chemistry, and one semester of college
algebra or higher.
·         Satisfactory completion of a course in medical terminology or pass a medical terminology proficiency examination. Candidates who are unable to pass the
medical terminology proficiency examination will be required to participate in a self-study program and pass a re-test.
·         The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and TOEFL are only required for international students.
•          Interview, if requested.
•          Graduate School application fee.

Although not required, shadowing an organ procurement coordinator is highly recommended.

Course Number Title Credits

Fall    

Course                    Course Name                                                               Credit Hours

HDSC501               Introduction to Organ Transplant Procurement                      3
HDSC521               Scientific and Clinical Foundations for Human Organ 
         Donation and Transplantation                                           8
HDSC511               Clinical Practicum                                                                  4

Spring    

Course                    Course Name                                                               Credit Hours

HDSC531               Clinical Aspects of Human Organ Procurement                    4
HDSC512               Clinical Practicum II                                                               2
HDSC502               Scholarly Project                                                                    6
PUBH600               Biostatistics                                                                            3

Summer    

Course                    Course Name                                                               Credit Hours

HDSC513               Clinical Internship                                                                  8
HDSC541               Capstone Seminar                                                                  2

Total Credit Hours                                                                                                40


page top

Medical Physics Programs

Degree Programs

             MSBS Medical Physics (Diagnostic Imaging Track)
             MSBS Medical Physics (Radiation Oncology Track)
             (also Ph.D. in Physics and Astronomy with specialization in medical physics in both tracks is offered through the College of Arts and Sciences.)

Accreditations

             The MSBS program in medical physics and the Ph.D. in Physics and Astronomy with specialization in medical physics are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (www.campep.org).

Master of Science in Biomedical Science:  Medical Physics

Programs of study leading to the MSBS degree in medical physics is offered by the graduate faculty of the Department of Radiation Oncology and the Department of Radiology.  In addition to the basic medical science and radiological physics coursework, a specific course of study is offered in radiation oncology physics or in diagnostic imaging. This course of study includes didactic courses, independent study, and hands-on clinical activity covering the selected discipline, along with specific technical research culminating in a research project or thesis.  The graduate program is committed to excellence in scientific education, clinical experience, and research leading to the professional development of highly motivated and dedicated students. In addition to the capability of creative scientific research, the coursework and clinical experience is intended to provide students with the fundamental knowledge and educational requirement for eventually becoming board certified in their area of study by The American Board of Radiology, The American Board of Medical Physics, or other credentialing body. 

Curriculum:

The didactic course curriculum typically includes the following courses in addition to additional special topic courses and clinical training.

Medical physics core courses include:

·         On being a scientist seminar
·         Introduction to anatomy and physiology
·         Radiation biology
·         Radiation dosimetry I
·         Radiation detection and measurement
·         Radiation protection and regulation
·         Survey of clinical radiation oncology
·         Medical physics seminar

Typical course curriculum in Medical Physics - Radiation Oncology track include:

·         Radiological physics
·         Radiation dosimetry II
·         Physics of radiation therapy
·         Brachytherapy
·         Practical measurements in radiation oncology  

Typical course curriculum in Medical Physics - Diagnostic Imaging track include:

·         Diagnostic imaging physics
·         Principles of Nuclear Medicine
·         Independent Study (CT and MRI) 

Non-thesis option:

A non-thesis option is available for students who present advanced degrees from previous graduate work which included a scientific thesis or dissertation.

Ph.D. track:

The Ph.D. in Physics with Concentration in Medical Physics satisfies all of the requirements for a Ph.D. in Physics degree while preparing students for a career in medical physics.  The medical physics related courses are provided by departments on the Health Science Campus in addition to the core degree requirements from the Department of Physics and Astronomy.  The student’s faculty advisory committee will consist of faculty members from the Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Radiology, and Radiation Oncology.  A dissertation research project is chosen that will have relevance to both physics and medical physics.  See Department of Physics and Astronomy section for admission and degree requirements.

Research Facilities

The Department of Radiation Oncology have access to a variety of computer systems for radiation oncology treatment planning, programming, and image analysis. A wide range of radiation measuring equipment is available, including a full range of dosimetry and quality control test equipment, Wellhoffer computerized beam scanning system, an array of ionization chambers, packages for film dosimetry and analysis, oscilloscopes, and test phantoms. Also available are multichannel analyzer scintillation detectors, autogamma, and liquid scintillation counters, diode, thermoluminescent dosimetry systems, and scanner for chromic film dosimetry system.

Good access is available to clinical equipment. Clinical radiation oncology systems includes two fully equipped SL25 linear accelerators of the precise series, used for external electron and x-ray beam radiation oncology, a superficial x-ray therapy unit, a Ximatron x-ray simulator, Varian high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR). In addition to HDR brachytherapy, UT offers a range of low dose rate (LDR) modalities such as prostate seed implant, other sealed radioactive source implants as well as radiopharmaceutical therapy procedures. Besides being a leader in intra-operative Radiation Oncology, UT provides IMRT, and IGRT treatment planning, conventional 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy, and stereotactic neurologic radiosurgery capabilities with inverse planning arc modulation technology.

The Department of Radiology maintains and provides access to a full range of clinical diagnostic imaging systems.  These include three computed tomography (CT) scanners (a Toshiba 64 slice, a Toshiba 16 slice, and a GE high speed CT scanner), and two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems with fast scanning, vascular imaging and functional imaging capabilities (a 3T General Electric Signa HDX system and a 1.5T Siemens Espree system). Several single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems nuclear medicine imaging systems including a GE Hawkeye SPECT/CT system as well as contract mobile services for PET/CT (positron emission tomography) imaging.  Mammography x-ray imaging includes film/screen, digital, and dedicated biopsy systems.  General radiography uses both direct digital and computed radiography cassette systems, and fluoroscopy and cardiovascular imaging consist of both image intensified and direct digital detectors.  Fully integrated picture archiving and communications system (PACS) is used for all imaging, and Terarecon image processing workstation and network system used for 3D and advanced image processing.

Master of Science in Biomedical Science:  Medical Science

The primary goal of this program is to educate and train graduate students who have completed all prerequisites required for medical school but wish to enhance their understanding of the biological sciences and potentially improve their academic credentials for  applying to medical school. Strong applicants for medical school are students who typically have an excellent overall and science grade point average (GPA), good scores on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT), strong letters of recommendation and very good interpersonal skills. Students with good overall credentials, but who need additional opportunity to demonstrate their ability to master challenging coursework will benefit from this program.

In the MSBS-Medical Sciences program, students will have the opportunity to complete coursework with medical students (being graded on the same scale), participate in other graduate college courses, and design, perform and present their own scholarly project. This curriculum will provide foundational information for continued study in the medical school curriculum. Students completing this program with strong academic performance, as indicated by high GPAs, will have confirmed their ability to perform in the medical school curriculum, and therefore greatly strengthen their overall admission package. Students enrolled in the program are guaranteed an interview for medical school at the University Of Toledo College Of Medicine. Students who successfully complete the program will also be awarded the Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences degree (MSBS). Completion of this degree is a requirement, but not a guarantee of admission into the Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree program at the University of Toledo

College of Medicine. If you have previously applied to the MD degree program at the University of Toledo College of Medicine, and

wish to re-apply after completing the MSBS-MS program, you will need to submit a new application to the medical school.

·         Applicant must be a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident
·         Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university
•          All prerequisites required for medical school must be completed prior to admission into the MSBS-MS program
o    Official MCAT score (25 or higher is recommended)
o    Official Undergraduate transcripts confirming degree submitted directly to the College of Graduate Studies
•          GPA of 3.0 or greater is recommended
·         Three letters of recommendation
o    Committee recommendation letters are accepted with all signatures
o    Recommendation Letters must include your full name
·         Personal statement
o    Personal Statements submitted from medical school admission are not accepted. A new career goals personal statement is required for MSBS-MS admission.
o    Personal Statements must include your full name
·         University of Toledo College of Graduate Studies application
·         $45 Application Fee
o    Please note that your application will not be processed until this fee is submitted
•          Please note: If you have already applied to UT Medical School you must submit written authorization to the College of Graduate Studies in order for them to access your records. Please do not make this request until you have submitted your application and fee.

Fall (17 credit hours)

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

INDI520                 Cellular and Molecular Biology                            11
PHSL505                Human Physiology                                                3
PUBH600               Biostatistics                                                            3

Spring (14 credit hours)

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

INDI555                 Anatomy and Pathophysiology                              3
INDI602                 “On Being a Scientist”                                           1
NERS581                Neuroscience                                                          6
PHYA660               Research Practicum                                                1
PUBH601               Public Health Epidemiology                                   3
                                (Block 3 with medical students)

Summer (9 credit hours)

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

INDI698                 Scholarly Project                                                    9

Total                                                                                                      40

Master of Science in Biomedical Science:  Oral Biology

Department of Dentistry

Michael Nedley, D.D.S., chair

The oral biology program is restricted to Pediatric Dentistry Residents who are completing their training at the UT College of Medicine and UTMC. The program’s curriculum is designed specific to each Dental Resident and students should consult with their advisor to create their specific plan of study.     

Summer Year 1

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

DENT691               Journal Paper Review in Pediatric Dentistry          
DENT692               Seminar in Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
INDI699                 Thesis Research

Total  9-11 are customary for master’s students                                                     

Fall Year 1

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

DENT690               Independent Study in Pediatric Dentistry
DENT691               Journal Paper Review in Pediatric Dentistry
DENT692               Seminar in Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
INDI699                 Thesis Research
PUBH600               Public Health Statistics

Total 12 are customary for master’s students                                                         

Spring Year 1

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

DENT672               Current Topics in Oral Biology
DENT691               Journal Paper Review in Pediatric Dentistry
DENT692               Seminar in Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
INDI699                 Thesis Research

Total 12 are customary for master’s students                                                         

Summer Year 2

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

DENT690               Independent Study in Pediatric Dentistry
DENT691               Journal Paper Review in Pediatric Dentistry
INDI699                 Thesis Research

Total  9-11 are customary for master’s students                                                     

Fall Year 2

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

DENT690               Independent Study in Pediatric Dentistry
DENT691               Journal Paper Review in Pediatric Dentistry
DENT692               Seminar in Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
INDI699                 Thesis Research

Total  12-15 are customary for master’s students                                                   

Spring Year 2

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

DENT690               Independent Study in Pediatric Dentistry
DENT692               Seminar in Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
INDI602                 "On Being a Scientist"
INDI699                 Thesis Research

Total  12-15 are customary for master’s students                                                   

Master of Science in Biomedical Science:  Orthopaedic Sciences

 

page top

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

Nabil Ebraheim, M.D., chair 

Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences (M.S.B.S.)

Track Name: Bone Biology and Orthopaedic Sciences

The Bone Biology and Orthopaedic Sciences track in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Education Program at the University of Toledo College of Medicine provides broad basic science research training and clinical research background for the next generation of research scientists and clinicians to improve the quality of human life. The program offers Master of Science (M.S.) only or a combination with the Medical degree (MD/MS).

Research in Bone Biology and Orthopaedic Sciences at the University of Toledo College of Medicine covers a broad spectrum of topics including:

·         Biomechanics
·         Biomineralization
·         Bone diseases
·         Bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
·         Hand and foot disorders
·         Hip and knee replacements
·         Spinal injuries and disorders
·         Sports medicine
·         Stem cell technologies
·         Trauma/fixation

Internationally recognized faculty members in these areas are well-funded by extramural grant agencies including both federal and industrial. Modern research laboratories in the Bone Biology and Orthopaedic Sciences are well-equipped to apply state-of-the-art technologies in bone biology, bone tissue engineering, and biomechanices.

Please e-mail questions, comments and suggestions to Bone Biology and Orthopaedic Sciences track director Dr. Nabil Ebraheim (nabil.ebraheim@utoledo.edu).

The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery offers graduate-level courses through the Masters of Science in Biomedical Sciences program at the University of Toledo. This is a 2 year program consisting of classes, seminars, and research.  The students work with Dr. Nabil Ebraheim, chairman of the department of Orthopaedic Surgery, and Dr. Vijay Goel, chairman of the Bioengineering department.  Each student picks a research topic for his/her thesis, works on the thesis, and finally defends the thesis in front of a panel of faculty.

Our unique partnership with the Department of Bioengineering on the main campus of University of Toledo allows our researchers and physicians to have access to not only lab and research facilities, but also to the expertise of scientists in the biomechanics field.

Currently offered credits include:

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

ORTH560               Physical Examination of the 
                                     Musculoskeletal System 
ORTH570               Orthopaedic X-ray Conference 
ORTH580               Bone Physiology
ORTH585               Sports Medicine
ORTH590               Orthopaedic Biomechanics I
ORTH591               Orthopaedic Biomechanics II
ORTH592               Orthopaedic Biomechanics III
ORTH650               Orthopaedic Basic Science Seminar
ORTH655               Journal Paper Review in Orthopaedic Science
ORTH673               Research in Orthopaedic Science
ORTH691               Independent Study (Orthopaedic Trauma)
ORTH692               Independent Study (Spine)
ORTH693               Independent Study (Orthopaedic Biomechanics)
ORTH694               Independent Study (Orthopaedic Anatomy)
ORTH695               Independent Study (Orthopaedic Radiology)
ORTH696               Independent Study (Upper Extremity and Hand)  

 

 

page top

Department of Physician Assistant Studies

Patricia A. Hogue, Ph.D, PA-C., chair

Accreditation

The UT Physician Assistant Program is fully accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA). Graduates of accredited programs are eligible to take the national certifying examination offered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA). Most states require certification in order to practice.

Masters Programs

Physician Assistants (PAs) are health care professionals, prepared and liscensed to practice medicine with physician supervision. Within the physician/PA relationship, PAs exercise autonomy in decision-making and provide a wide range of diagnostic and therapeutic services. The role of the Physician Assistant includes provision of primary and specialty care in medical and surgical practices located in rural, urban or suburban areas. Physician Assistant practice is patient care centered but may include education, research and administration duties. The American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) is the national organization that represents graduate PAs. The Student Academy of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (SAAAPA) serves the interests of PA students. The UT PA Program is a member of the Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA), which is the national organization representing Physician Assistant education.

Master of Science in Biomedical Science: Physician Assistant Studies

Physician Assistants (PAs) are health professionals, prepared to practice medicine with physician supervision. Within the physician/PA relationship, PAs exercise autonomy in decision-making and provide a wide range of diagnostic and therapeutic services. The role of the PA includes provision of primary and specialty care in medical and surgical practices located in rural, urban or suburban areas. Physician assistant practice is patient care centered but may include education, research and administrative duties.

The University of Toledo (UT) Physician Assistant Program is a graduate entry-level professional course of study enabling individuals who hold baccalaureate degrees to become PAs. The program is designed to prepare graduates for primary care practice with emphasis placed on both service to medically under served populations and the team approach to the delivery of health care. The program integrates graduate level critical thinking and analysis, problem solving, scientific inquiry, self-directed learning and the effective use of modern technology for professional practice that includes elements of research, leadership, education and continued professionalization of the physician assistant occupation.

Admission Requirements

The Physician Assistant Program will admit students each Fall Semester only.

Early submission of online CASPA.

To be considered for the Physician Assistant Program, candidates must comply with all of the following:

Completion of all admission requirements to CASPA (CASPA link) by OCTOBER 1.  CASPA will be available once the next cycle of application opens.

CASPA submissions must include:

·         Completed and signed application form
·         Application fee
·         Two letters of recommendation
·         Transcripts for all colleges/universities attended 

Applicants to the UT PA Program must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States.  Applicants who have completed any of their previous undergraduate or graduate training internationally must fulfill the requirements of the UT College of Graduate Studies for international students, which are available for viewing here. The UT PA Program requires applicants to provide foreign transcript evaluation from one of the accepted credential evaluation agencies: ECE or WES. The evaluation will be at the applicant's expense. In addition to the requirement for regular admission, all students from non-English speaking countries must achieve satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) (unless the international applicant has graduated from a US accredited college or university). All international applicants must also demonstrate that they have adequate financial resources for their graduate education before they can be admitted.  The TOEFL score requirements and a copy of the financial statement form are available for viewing here.

Applicants must have earned a Bachelor level degree with a cumulative 3.00 grade point average to be competitive AND to qualify for financial aid.  The Bachelor level degree must be completed by June 15, 2009 for those applying for entry into the UT PA class that matriculates (begins the program) in August, 2009. 

The following Minimum Prerequisites must be completed with a grade of B- or better:

1.        Human Anatomy (Lab recommended)

2.        Human Physiology (Lab recommended)

3.        Inorganic/General Chemistry with Lab

4.        Organic Chemistry with Lab

5.        Microbiology with Lab

6.        Introductory Psychology

7.        Additional Psychology Course (Lifespan Psychology recommended)

8.        College Algebra or higher mathematics 

9.        Medical Terminology (minimum 1 credit hour or pass a medical terminology test)  

Notes about Admission Requirements:

Each prerequisite course above must consist of at least three (3) SEMESTER credit hours (unless otherwise noted). All coursework identified above must be current within eight (8) years of admission to the program.  The deadline for finishing prerequisite coursework for the class entering in August, 2009 is June 15, 2009.  These are minimum program requirements.  All prerequisites must be completed with a grade of B- or better.  For courses where separate grades are assigned for lecture and laboratory sections, the candidate must receive a grade of B- or better for BOTH lecture and lab. For applicants enrolled at institutions that use a QUARTER system, credit hours are converted such that five (5) quarter hours = three (3) semester hours. 

In addition to the above minimum requirements, preference will be given to applicants that have earned a B- or better in any of the following advanced healthcare and science-related undergraduate or graduate courses, including but not limited to: genetics, biochemistry, immunology, physics, psychology, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology or mathematics.

For the class entering in August, 2009, candidates must hold at least a Bachelor level degree from an accredited college or university with a minimum 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) undergraduate cumulative grade point average (GPA). The deadline for completion of degree and all prerequisite courses is June 15, 2009. A candidate with less than a 3.0 undergraduate GPA may be considered for admission with regular student status only if he/she has completed at least 10 semester hours (15 quarter hours) of applicable coursework at the graduate level and has a minimum GPA of 3.0 in these courses.

Formal healthcare experience and/or shadowing of PAs or other healthcare providers is not required.  Candidates with formal health care experience must submit copies of any license, registration, or certification related to that field.

Prior to matriculation, candidates must present evidence that they are currently trained in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) according to American Heart Association standards. This training must be maintained throughout the program of study.

Candidates must demonstrate proof of prior Medical Terminology Course with a grade of B- or better or pass a proficiency exam administered prior to matriculation.

Preference will be given to current Ohio residents, graduates of The University of Toledo, non-traditional and diverse applicants and those with significant health care experience.

The UT PA Program does not provide advanced placement or advanced standing for any students. 

Selection Process:

Candidates for interviews will be selected from those with completed applications (both CASPA and UT PA Prerequisite Form) who meet the minimum entrance requirements.  Interviews typically occur in January and February.  The selection process is highly competitive and merely meeting minimum entrance requirements does not guarantee an interview or admission to the program.  For the UT PA class that entered in August, 2008 there were over 400 applicants and slightly over 100 interviews for 33 entering students.  Formal patient contact experience is not a requirement for entrance into the UT PA Program.  There are many factors involved in the selection process, including but not limited to: cumulative undergraduate (or completed graduate) grade point average, cumulative science grade point average, personal experiences, writing sample, reference letters, familiarity with the PA profession and the University, problem solving and teamwork. 

Based upon a point scoring system with holistic consideration of each candidate, the Admissions Committee may recommend one of the following:

Acceptance: Candidates with the highest scores (based upon the candidate’s completed CASPA application and interviews) will be recommended to the UT College of Graduate Studies for acceptance. The number of candidates recommended for acceptance will be determined annually by the PA Program class size. For the academic year starting in August, 2009, the program expects to accept 35 students.  Following interviews, candidates are informed of acceptance in March.

Alternate/Waiting List: A limited number of candidates will be listed as alternates and will be notified of this admission status. Candidates not admitted from the alternate list must reapply if they wish to be considered for the following year.  Following interviews, candidates are informed of alternate status in March and April.

Non-Acceptance: Candidates not accepted will be notified in writing. Those who applied for the August, 2011 class may contact the program after May 15, 2011 to find out how to strengthen their application. Candidates wishing to be considered for the following year must reapply.  Candidates not accepted are informed in April and May.  

Admission Criteria for "Conditional" Status

An applicant must complete the general admission requirements specified above. Circumstances which may result in a conditional admission include:

·         An applicant with a Bachelor's degree in progress (must be completed by June 15, 2009). An official transcript with the degree posted must be received prior to matriculation into the program. 
·         An applicant with an undergraduate cumulative grade point average (GPA) less than 3.0 may be admitted with conditional status. Students must achieve a 3.0 in graduate study at UT by the completion of 15 semester hours or may be subject to dismissal. In the past, candidates with undergraduate GPAs less than 3.0 have not been competitive unless they have demonstrated academic achievement through the completion of a relevant graduate level degree program.
·         An applicant who has any prerequisite courses to complete at the time of application may be admitted with conditional status, with a clear understanding that remaining prerequisites must be satisfactorily (grade of B- or better) completed prior by June 15, 2011 for matriculation into the Program. Official transcripts or other appropriate documentation will be required.
·         Candidates who are unable to pass the medical terminology proficiency examination will be required to participate in a self-study program and retest or satisfactorily complete a medical terminology course at an accredited college or university prior to matriculation in Fall courses.

Technical Standards for Admission

Our objective is to increase the opportunities for persons with disabilities, while maintaining the expectation that all students achieve the goals of the Program. The technical standards for admission establish the expectations and abilities considered essential for students admitted to the Physician Assistant Program in order to achieve the level of competency required for graduation and ultimately practice as a physician assistant. All students admitted to the PA Program are expected to be able to demonstrate the abilities specified below.

Physician Assistant Program students:

·         must have the mental capacity to assimilate and learn a large amount of complex, technical and detailed information, to solve clinical problems, and synthesize and apply concepts and information from various disciplines in order to formulate diagnostic and therapeutic plans;
·         must have the ability to maintain composure and emotional stability during periods of high stress;
·         must have the ability to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients from different social and cultural backgrounds and develop effective professional rapport with patients and co-workers;
·         must have the ability to record examination and diagnostic results clearly, accurately and efficiently;
·         must have adequate sensory function to fulfill minimum competency objectives for palpation, percussion and auscultation necessary to perform a physical examination;
·         must possess sufficient postural control, neuromuscular control and eye-to-hand coordination to use standard medical/surgical instruments and possess sufficient control of the upper extremities to meet the physical requirements for training and for performing a safe physical examination;
·         are expected to learn and perform common diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (e.g., blood drawing, suturing) and interpret the results;
·         are expected to have a the degree of coordination of motor skills necessary to respond to emergency situations quickly and appropriately.

Candidates are urged to ask questions about the program's technical standards for clarification and to determine whether they can meet the requirements with or without reasonable accommodations. Questions may be directed to the Program Director or Office of Student Services. Revealing a disability is voluntary; however, such disclosure is necessary before any accommodations may be made in the learning environment or in the Program's procedures. Information about disabilities is handled in a confidential manner. Reasonable accommodations will be made to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. These require program and institutional approval. Requests for accommodations must be submitted in writing, allowing sufficient time prior to matriculation for action on these requests pursuant to Policy 01061, Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability.

Other Requirements

Individuals selected for admission to the program must undergo a general physical examination and provide evidence of up-to-date immunization prior to the start of classes in the first year and again just prior to the beginning of clinical rotations in the second year. In addition, students are required to maintain health insurance and liability insurance coverage. Further information is contained in the College of Graduate Studies Handbook and will be reviewed in detail at orientation.

Curriculum

Note: Physician Assistant Program courses listed in the chart below may not be taken out of sequence for any reason and may require a passing grade of B or better for progression through the program.  All students must complete every course.  There is no advance standing or transfer credit to replace any of these courses. 

COURSE SEQUENCE

Semester 1 FALL             

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

ANAT500               Anatomy for Physician Assistants                         5   
PHYS505               Physiology for Physician Assistants                      3     
PHYA501               Introduction to the P.A. Profession                        1   
PHYA510               Prin. of Interviewing & Medical History               3   
PHYA514               Health Care Teams & Systems                               2   

Total                                                                                                      14

Semester 2 SPRING              

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PHYA540               Pathophysiology I                                                  2     
PHYA521               Diagnostic & Therapeutic Skills I                          2     
PHYA531               Clinical Medicine I                                                 4   
PHYA551               Pharmacology I                                                      2     
PHYA513               Patient Evaluation                                                   3     
PHYA605               Medical Ethics                                                        2     

Total                                                                                                      15 Semester 3 SUMMER         

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PHYA552               Pharmacology II                                                     2   
PHYA541               Pathophysiology II                                                 2   
PHYA534               Clinical Medicine II                                                3   
PHYA522               Diagnostic & Therapeutic Skills II                         1   
PHYA611               Health Promotion & Disease Prevention                1   
PHYA601               Basic Genetics                                                        1 
PHYA602               Long Term Care                                                     1 

Total                                                                                                      11

Semester 4 FALL      

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PHYA553               Pharmacology III                                                   2  
PHYA533               Clinical Medicine III                                              6  
PHYA523               Diagnotic & Therapeutic Skills III                         2  
PHYA613               Research & Statistics                                              2 
PHYA615               Behavioral Science                                                 2 

Total                                                                                                      14

Semester 5 SPRING      

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PHYA650               Introduction to Clinical Practice                             1  
PHYA660               Research Practicum                                                1  
PHYA661               Scholarly Project I                                                  1   
                                Clinical Practice (3 rotations)                                 6  

Total                                                                                                       9

Semester 6 SUMMER      

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

                                Clinical Practice (3 rotations)                                 6  
PHYA662               Scholarly Project II                                                1  

Total                                                                                                       7

Semester 7 FALL      

Course                    Course Name                                               Credit Hours

PHYA663               Scholarly Project III                                               1  
PHYA676               Clinical Preceptorship                                            3   
                                Clinical Practice (2 rotations)                                 2 

Total                                                                                                       6

TOTAL PROGRAM HOURS   76

Clinical Practice consists of a total eight (one-month) rotations, with one in each of the following specialties: emergency medicine, internal medicine, family medicine, long-term care, prenatal/gynecology, surgery, pediatrics, and an elective (which may be any specialty of medicine).

 

page top

Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine
Sheryl Milz, Ph.D., interim chair

Master of Public Health Program

The Northwest Ohio Consortium for Public Health (NOCPH) Master of Public Health (MPH) degree program is offered jointly by Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo. It provides advanced study beyond the bachelor degree for persons wishing to update professional skills and obtain new professional competencies in the area of public health. The program prepares students to enhance public health locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. The graduates will have acquired the knowledge to: become advocates for needed change; assess factors affecting health; critique and apply research findings; and, develop health promotion and illness and injury prevention programs. Graduates receive a degree awarded jointly by both institutions.

The NOCPH MPH degree program is fully accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) and requires a minimum of 12 to 15 months to complete as a full time student. Part time students take approximately 30 months to complete the program.

Five majors are offered:

·         Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety Sciences (ENVH): Students graduating from this major are prepared to address environmental and occupational health issues from scientific, regulatory, and administrative perspectives for private industry, health departments, regulatory agencies, consulting firms, and other organizations.

·         Health Promotion and Education (HPRO): Students graduating from this major are prepared to assist communities, organizations and individuals in working toward a healthier society by using appropriate educational, behavioral, and social change strategies.

·         Public Health Administration (PHAD): Students graduating from this major are prepared to assume applicable administrative roles in government and community agencies, health care facilities, and private industry.

·         Public Health Epidemiology (PHEP): Students graduating from this major are prepared to study the distribution of disease in large groups or from a population-based perspective. Epidemiologists attempt to quantify the distribution and establish the determinants of health problems by describing and analyzing the biological, environmental, social and behavioral factors affecting health, illness and premature death. Epidemiologists often work for local, state, and federal governments, health care organizations, private industry, and institutions of higher education.

·         Public Health Nutrition (PHNU): Students graduating from this major are prepared to advance knowledge regarding the role of nutrition in disease prevention and health promotion and apply this knowledge to planning, managing, delivering, and evaluating nutrition services and programs. Public Health Nutritionists integrate the knowledge, skills, and experience fundamental to all public health disciplines and apply this integrated knowledge to alleviate diet-related health problems among diverse population groups. Employment often includes health departments, federal and private food assistance programs, worksite health promotion programs, nutrition advocacy organizations, health centers and schools.

SINGLE MPH DEGREE AND SINGLE MAJOR PROGRAM

NOCPH MPH students designate a major upon application to the MPH program.  NOCPH MPH students may change their major at any time during the program by completing a Change of Major form

To earn the MPH degree, a student must complete 45-semester credit (scr) curriculum. The 45 scr. curriculum consists of 8 core courses (24 scr) completed by all MPH students regardless of declared major, 4-5 (12-15 scr) major specific courses, and 2-3 (6-9 scr) advised electives. All students must meet with their major advisor within their first two semesters in the program to develop a plan of study. Once developed, the plan of study is signed by the student, the student's major advisor, and a NOCPH director. The signed plan of study is then submitted to the College of Graduate Studies on the Health Science Campus.

DUAL MPH MAJOR PROGRAM

NOCPH MPH students may also pursue the requirements for two majors (i.e., dual major). The option is intended for individuals who desire to combine education and training related to one specific major of the MPH with another major within the MPH program to expand their overall knowledge and expertise. Any combination of two of the five majors is acceptable as a dual major. A dual major may be selected upon application to the MPH program or at any time once admitted to the program.

Individuals interested in completing the dual major option must be simultaneously registered for both majors for at least one semester. Dual major MPH students must complete the 45 scr curriculum described above for one major plus an additional 21 scr for the second major. The additional 21 scr consists of 4-5 major specific courses (12-15 scr) and 2-3 advised electives (6-9 scr) for the second major. All students must meet with the major advisor from each major to develop a dual major plan of study. Once developed, the plan of study is signed by the student, the student's major advisors, and a NOCPH director. The signed plan of study is then submitted to the College of Graduate Studies on the Health Science Campus.

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM

The NOCPH also offers several dual degree options. The option is intended for individuals who desire to combine education and training related to a specific major of the MPH with another degree to expand their overall knowledge and expertise. The dual degree programs combine the MPH with other master (MBA, MA, MS, MSOH) or doctoral (MD, PhD, EdD, JD) degrees offered by one or more of the two consortial institutions (BGSU and UT). The preceding list of dual degrees is only for illustration. Any graduate degree offered by the two consortial institutions may be combined with the MPH degree in a dual degree program.

Students must meet all application, retention and graduation requirements for each of the individual degrees. Individuals interested in completing the dual degree option must be simultaneously registered for both degrees for at least one semester. Students will be able to apply a maximum of 12 scr of overlapping courses to fulfill required credits for both degrees, pending approval of the NOCPH Directors and Program Coordinators of both degree programs.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Interested prospective students apply to the NOCPH MPH degree through the University of Toledo website. Applicants are required to complete an online application, as well as submit official transcripts from all institutions where they have taken courses (transcripts from institutions outside the US must be translated, evaluated, and reported on the 4.00 scale), 3 letters of recommendation (2 of which must be from persons with a graduate degree), a resume, and a letter of interest.

The GRE is not required for graduates from an accredited US institution with a GPA > 3.00. The GRE may be required by the NOCPH MPH Admissions Committee for applicants with a GPA < 3.00. The GRE is required for all students graduating from institutions outside the US.

Regular admission to the NOCPH MPH program requires:

·         An earned bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university
·         GPA > 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale)
·         Foundation courses in college-level mathematics, biology, and social sciences
o    ENVH majors must also complete college-level courses in inorganic and organic chemistry
·         GRE > 1000 (verbal and quantitative), if the test is required, with an analytical writing score > 4.0
·         TOEFL > 550 (paper-based) and > 213 (computer-based) for applicants who graduated from institutions outside the US and whose primary language is not English.
·         Provisional admission to the NOCPH MPH program may be offered with one or more of the following deficiencies:
·         Missing foundation course(s)
·         GPA < 3.00, but > 2.5

Provisional students take 4 courses (12 scr) in the MPH program. Preferably, all 4 courses will be courses, but 1 major specific course is also allowed. No electives may be taken. Students must attain a B or better in each of these courses to be admitted as a regular status student. Any student not attaining a B or better in these 4 courses could be dismissed from the program.

CORE COURSES

All NOCPH MPH students are required to take the following 8 (24 scr) core courses. These core courses are offered at both Bowling Green State University (3-4 courses, depending on major) and the University of Toledo (4-5 courses, depending on major).

·         PUBH 600 - Biostatistics (offered at UT)
·         PUBH 601 - Public Health Epidemiology (offered at UT)
·         PUBH 604 - Public Health Administration (offered at BG)
·         PUBH 605 - Introduction to Public Health (offered at BG)
o    PUBH 516 - Environmental Health Science, Regulations, and Management (offered at UT for ENVH majors only to take in place of PUBH 605)
·         PUBH 660 - Health Behavior (offered at UT)
·         PUBH 664 - Issues in Public Health (offered at UT)
·         PUBH 685 - Capstone Seminar (offered at BG)
·         PUBH 683/696 - Internship or PUBH 684/697 - Scholarly Project (offered at both BG and UT)


STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Student learning objectives for the MPH degree core curriculum (courses taken by all MPH students):

·         Provide a fundamental understanding of public health, what it does, and how it achieves its mission
·         Provide a general knowledge, skill, and ability in areas which enable performance of one or more essential public health services
·         Competent in analytical skills, including statistics, problem definition, and analysis
·         Skilled in oral and written communication
·         Develop policy
·         Promote cultural skills
·         Competent in basic public health sciences including epidemiology, environmental health, and behavioral science
·         Able to lead and apply systems thinking
·         Provide technical knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for public health programs such as infectious disease control, disease prevention, and occupational and environmental health

 

page top

Master of Public Health:  Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety Sciences (ENVH)

Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety Sciences (ENVH) specialists focus on a combination of scientific, technical and regulatory aspects of public health that relate to the assessment and control of hazards such as physical, chemical and biological agents in non-occupational and occupational environments. The major focus is recognition, evaluation and control of human exposures resulting from contact with contaminated air, water, soil and food. Emergency and disaster planning, preparation, recognition and response are also emphasized. The ENVH major expands students’ knowledge, comprehension and skills to prepare them for work as professionals involved with development, implementation, delivery and management of applicable focused or broad scope environmental and occupational health and safety programs. Examples of applicable programs include community and/or worker awareness education and training programs; environmental and occupational disease causation, prevention and remediation programs; hazardous non-occupational and occupational site investigation, sampling, assessment and control; and regulatory compliance and/or enforcement. ENVH professionals also have the education and training applicable to preparedness for, recognition of, and response to natural disaster and intentional terrorist events.

The student learning objectives for the ENVH major are to graduate professionals that are prepared to:

·         Apply the fundamental and advanced principles of statistics, epidemiology, environmental health science, and occupational health and safety science to real-world public health issues and problems
·         Objectively and subjectively assess chemical, biological, and physical agents classified as hazardous to human health (including terrorism agents)
·         Critically analyze and interpret statistical, epidemiological, toxicological and communicable disease information for prevention and remediation program
development and implementation
·         Conduct fundamental sample collection of media contaminated with hazardous chemical, biological, and physical agents
·         Collect and evaluate applicable information necessary to perform risk assessments and conduct disaster preparation/planning
·         Make administrative decisions based on recommended measures to reduce or eliminate environmental and occupational health hazards
·         Develop and present administrative, scientific, technical and/or regulatory reports

All ENVH majors are required to take the following 5 (15 scr) major specific courses. These courses are all offered at UT. In addition, all ENVH majors are required to take 2 (6 scr) advised electives.

·         PUBH 502 - Occupational Health - Science, Regulations, and Management
·         PUBH 506 - Occupational Safety - Science, Regulations, and Management
·         PUBH 531 - Chemical Agents - Toxicity, Evaluation, and Control
·         PUBH 552 - Biological Agents - Pathogenicity, Evaluation, and Control
·         PUBH 562 - Physical Agents - Effects, Evaluation, and Control

Master of Public Health:  Health Promotion and Education (HPRO)

The curriculum for the Health Promotion and Education (HPRO) major focuses on methods for planning, implementing and evaluating educational and behavioral changes as well as programs that enhance health. Students are prepared for positions that emphasize program planning, health promotion, health education, disease prevention and social action. Graduates work in business, voluntary, non-profit and governmental agencies at the local, county, state and federal levels.

The student learning objectives for the HPRO major are to graduate professionals that are prepared to:

·         Implement, administer, and evaluate health promotion and education programs
·         Demonstrate mastery of knowledge that is critical to the role of a health promotion and educational professional
·         Coordinate the provision of promotional and educational services in health
·         Assess individual and community needs
·         Apply principles of community organization, health behavior, and educational processes to plan effective health promotion and education programs
·         Apply appropriate research methods
·         Act as a health promotion and education resource

All HPRO majors are required to take the following 4 (12 scr) major specific courses. These courses are all offered at UT. In addition, all HPRO majors are required to take 3 (9 scr) advised electives.

·         PUBH 620 - Methods and Materials in Public Health
·         PUBH 630 - Community Health Organizations
·         PUBH 646 - Health Promotion Programs
·         PUBH 680 - Evaluation of Health Programs

Master of Public Health:  Public Health Administration (PHAD)

The curriculum for the Public Health Administration (PHAD) major is designed to prepare students to assume administrative responsibilities in healthcare agencies, government, community organizations and private industry. The course work provides instruction in several key administrative areas. Many of the courses are similar to the required courses in a Master of Business Administration (MBA) program with the difference that the PHA major curriculum focuses on applications and issues in healthcare.

The student learning objectives for the PHAD major are to graduate professionals that are prepared to:

·         Supervise subordinates using techniques endorsed by human resource experts
·         Manage a public health organization using contemporary standards and practices
·         Comply with applicable legal standards and federal requirements pertaining to public health, employees and organizations
·         Develop and administer an organizational budget
·         Evaluate the financial and economic health of an organization, business, or practice
·         Apply relevant economic theory to organizational situations
·         Evaluate administrative personnel, organizational effectiveness, economic stability, regulatory compliance, and related supervisory programs and practices

All PHAD majors are required to take the following 4 (12 scr) major specific courses. These courses are all offered at BG. In addition, all PHAD majors are required to take 3 (9 scr) advised electives.

·         PUBH 621 - Management
·         PUBH 622 - Finance and Budgets
·         PUBH 628 - Economics, Marketing, and Human Resources
·         PUBH 635 - Public Health Law

 

page top

Master of Public Health:  Public Health Epidemiology (PHEP)

The Public Health Epidemiology (PHEP) major prepares students for careers involving the study of the distribution of disease in large groups or from a population-based perspective. It involves factors affecting disease and disability in populations. As a fundamental science of public health and preventive medicine, epidemiology research has traditionally focused on questions of disease causation through population studies for both infectious and chronic diseases. Epidemiologists attempt to quantify the distribution and establish the determinants of health problems by describing and analyzing the biological, environmental, social and behavioral factors affecting health, illness and premature death. Descriptive and analytic techniques are used to gather information on disease occurrence, extend basic knowledge about the physical, mental and social processes affecting health, and develop effective disease-control measures. The products of such inquiries are also used in the formulation of health policies. Quantitative skills, including biostatistics and computer applications, are emphasized in this major. Epidemiologists work closely with other health professionals including physicians, environmental health personnel, behavioral scientists, demographers, biostatisticians, and administrators of health agencies. Epidemiologists often work for local, state, and federal governments, health care organizations, private industry, and institutions of higher education.

The student learning objectives for the PHEP major are to graduate professionals that are prepared to:

·         Define and calculate measures of disease frequency and measures of association between risk factors and disease
·         Describe the major epidemiologic research study designs and their advantages and limitations
·         Describe the major sources of bias in epidemiologic research (confounding, selection bias, and measurement error) and the ways to evaluate and reduce bias
·         Apply criteria to support whether an association is causal
·         Understand the basic terms and methods used in outbreak investigation, infectious disease epidemiology, chronic disease epidemiology, disease prevention
trials, and evaluation of screening tests
·         Review the scientific literature with competence, synthesize findings across studies, and make appropriate public health recommendations based on current knowledge
·         Design an epidemiologic study to address a question of interest
·         Interpret results of an epidemiologic study, including the relation to findings from other epidemiologic studies, potential biologic and/or social mechanisms, limitations of the study, and public health implications
·         Write a clear description of the rationale, methods, results, and interpretation of an epidemiologic investigation
·         Apply epidemiologic skills in a public health setting, specifically in the formulation or application of public health programs or policies

All PHEP majors are required to take the following 5 (15 scr) major specific courses. These courses are all offered at UT. In addition, all PHEP majors are required to take 2 (6 scr) advised electives.

·         PUBH 603 - Advanced Epidemiology
·         PUBH 606 - Advanced Biostatistics
·         PUBH 612 - Infectious Disease Epidemiology
·         PUBH 655 - Chronic Disease Epidemiology
·         PUBH 607 - Genetic Epidemiology or PUBH 617 - Molecular Epidemiology

Master of Public Health:  Public Health Nutrition (PHNU)

Public Health Nutritionists integrate the knowledge, skills and experiences fundamental to all public health disciplines and apply this integrated knowledge to alleviate diet-related health problems among diverse population groups. Graduates will be prepared to advance knowledge regarding the role of nutrition in disease prevention and health promotion and apply this knowledge to planning, managing, delivering, and evaluating nutrition services and programs. Employment often includes health departments, federal and private food assistance programs, worksite health promotion programs, nutrition advocacy organizations, health centers and schools. An understanding of human nutrition is important to maximize the health of individuals in a diverse society that faces nutrition-related diseases of both deficiency and excess. A complete understanding of human nutrition is built on knowledge of its fundamental biological and biochemical bases. It also involves an understanding of societal, psychological, cultural and behavioral influences that affect food consumption, and therefore, human well being. Public health nutrition advances knowledge regarding the role of nutrition in disease prevention and health promotion and applies this knowledge to planning, managing, delivering and evaluating nutrition services and programs. The MPH major in public health nutrition trains students to integrate the knowledge, skills, and experience fundamental to all public health disciplines and to apply this integrated knowledge to alleviate diet-related health problems among diverse population groups. The program is designed to train professionals to assume leadership positions in assessing community-nutrition needs and in planning, directing and evaluating the nutrition component of health-promotion and disease-prevention efforts.

The student learning objectives for the PHNU major are to graduate professionals that are prepared to:

·         Identify and assess diet-related health problems of undernutrition and overnutrition among diverse population groups
·         Identify the social, cultural, economic, environmental, and institutional factors that contribute to the risks of undernutrition and overnutrition among diverse populations
·         Develop educational and other population-based intervention strategies to improve food security
·         Develop policies to reduce barriers to food insecurity and to improve the food choices and nutritional status of diverse populations
·         Describe techniques to guide consumers in selection of food and nutritionally adequate diets
·         Communicate nutrition related issues skillfully, utilizing different media in varied settings
·         Apply the principles of management to community-nutrition programs
·         Participate in advocacy efforts to improve the nutritional status of various populations
·         Monitor and recommend public policies to protect and promote nutritional status and health of diverse populations
·         Contribute to the body of nutrition knowledge through active research of an applied nature

All PHNU majors are required to take the following 4 (12 scr) major specific courses. Courses are offered at both BG and UT. In addition, all PHNU majors are required to take 3 (9 scr) advised electives.

·         PUBBH 625 - Nutritional Epidemiology
·         PUBH 652 - Public Health Nutrition
·         Two of the following four courses
o    FDNU 535 - Life Cycle Nutrition: Pregnancy to Adolescence
o    FDNU 536 - Life Cycle Nutrition: The Middle and Later Years
o    FDNU 609 - Micronutrients
o    FDNU 610 - Macronutrients

 

page top

Master of Science in Occupational Health Program

The Master of Science in Occupational Health (MSOH) degree program is available in Industrial Hygiene. Industrial hygiene professionals are involved in understanding and implementing scientific, technical, and regulatory aspects that focus on preventing and controlling workers' exposures to factors and agents that can cause them harm. The profession focuses on prevention of exposure or occurrence and mitigation of factors and agents that contribute to worker harm, as work-related illnesses and injuries.

The comprehensive and flexible curriculum provides a solid foundation of information for students with limited or no background in industrial hygiene, while simultaneously offering students with professional experience the opportunity to expand the scope of their knowledge and skills. The program offers classes during evenings and weekends to facilitate graduate study for those engaged in full-time daily employment. The schedule also permits students without applicable practical experience to complete an internship.

The MSOH degree is fully accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology - Applied Science Accreditation Commission (ABET-ASAC) and requires a minimum of 12 months to complete as a full-time student. Part time students take approximately 30 months to complete the program.


ADDMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Applicants are required to complete an online application, as well as submit official transcripts from all institutions where they have taken courses (transcripts from institutions from outside the US must be translated, evaluated, and reported on the 4.00 scale), 3  letters of recommendation (2 of which must be from persons with a graduate degree), a resume, and a letter of interest.

The GRE is not required for graduates from an accredited US institution with a GPA > 3.00. The GRE may be required by the NOCPH MPH Admissions Committee for applicants with a GPA < 3.00. The GRE is required for all students graduating from institutions outside the US.

Regular admission to the MSOH program requires:

·         An earned bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university
·         GPA > 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale)
·         Foundation courses in college-level mathematics (preferably calculus), inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, biology, and English/writing
o    Also considered work experience based on applicability and duration and applicable certifications such as CIH or CSP
·         GRE > 1000 (verbal and quantitative), if the test is required, with an analytical writing score > 4.0
·         TOEFL > 550 (paper-based) and > 213 (computer-based) for applicants who graduated from institutions outside the US and whose primary language is not English.

Provisional admission to the NOCPH MPH program may be offered with one or more of the following deficiencies:

·         Missing foundation course(s)
·         GPA < 3.00, but > 2.5

Provisional students take 4 courses (12 scr) in the MPH program. Preferably, all 4 courses will be courses, but 1 major specific course is also allowed. No electives may be taken. Students must attain a B or better in each of these courses to be admitted as a regular status student. Any student not attaining a B or better in these 4 courses could be dismissed from the program.

 

page top

CURRICULUM DESIGN

The 40 scr curriculum incorporates the general areas of science, technology, management, and communication within the context of the core courses and thesis requirements for the MSOH degree.

All MSOH students take the following courses. For those students not requiring an internship, 1 advised elective is added.

·         PUBH 502 - Occupational Health - Science, Regulations, and Management
·         PUBH 506 - Occupational Safety - Science, Regulations, and Management
·         PUBH 516 - Environmental Health Science, Regulations, and Management
·         PUBH 526 - Hazardous Materials and Emergency Response
·         PUBH 531 - Chemical Agents - Toxicity, Evaluation, and Control
·         PUBH 541 - Air Contaminant Modeling, Ventilation, and Respiratory Protection
·         PUBH 552 - Biological Agents - Pathogenicity, Evaluation, and Control
·         PUBH 562 - Physical Agents - Effects, Evaluation, and Control
·         PUBH 570 - Risk Assessment, Management, and Communication
·         PUBH 600 - Biostatistics
·         PUBH 601 - Public Health Epidemiology
·         PUBH 696 - Internship (required if < 1 year experience)
·         PUBH 697 - Scholarly Project or PUBH 699 - Thesis

 

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Student learning objectives for the MSOH degree program:

·         Identify agents, factors, and stressors generated by and/or associated with defined sources, unit operations, and/or processes
·         Describe qualitative and quantitative aspects of generation of agents, factors, and stressors
·         Describe physiological and/or toxicological interactions of physical, chemical, biological, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors with the human body
·         Assess qualitative and quantitative aspects of exposure assessment, dose-response, and risk characterization based on applicable pathways and modes of entry
·         Calculate, interpret, and apply statistical and epidemiological data
·         Recommend and evaluate engineering, administrative, and personal protective equipment controls and/or other interventions to reduce or eliminate hazards
·         Demonstrate an understanding of applicable business and managerial practices
·         Interpret and apply applicable occupational and environmental regulations
·         Describe fundamental aspects of safety and environmental health

 

 

page top

Certificate in Biostatistics and Epidemiology

The 15 scr graduate Certificate in Biostatistics and Epidemiology focuses on the development of the qualitative and quantitative knowledge and skills to collect, organize, analyze, and interpret data associated with epidemiologic investigations, health surveys, injury and illness recognition, and human exposure assessment. The Certificate in Biostatistics and Epidemiology provides learners with an expanded scope and depth of quantitative knowledge and skills, as compared to the Certificate in Epidemiology. NOCPH MPH students may not take this certificate concurrently while earning the MPH.

CURRICULUM

Certificate in Biostatistics and Epidemiology students take the following courses.

·         PUBH 600/800 - Biostatistics
·         PUBH 601/801 - Public Health Epidemiology
·         PUBH 603/803 - Advanced Epidemiology
·         PUBH 606/806 - Advanced Biostatistics
·         PUBH 611/811 - Categorical Data Analysis

 

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Student learning objectives for the Certificate in Biostatistics and Epidemiology:

·         Select and apply appropriate biostatistical and epidemiological methods and interpret basic and applied research data
·         Define and calculate measures of disease frequency and measures of association between risk factors and disease
·         Describe the major epidemiologic research study designs and their advantages and limitations
·         Define the basic terms and apply methods used in outbreak investigation, infectious disease epidemiology, chronic disease epidemiology, disease prevention trials, and evaluation of screening tests
·         Review the scientific literature with competence, synthesize findings across studies, and make appropriate public health recommendations based on current
knowledge
·         Design an epidemiologic study to address a question of interest
·         Write a clear description of the rationale, methods, results, and interpretation of an epidemiologic investigation.
·         Apply epidemiologic skills in a clinical or public health setting, specifically in the formulation or application of health-related programs or policies

 

 

page top

Certificate in Epidemiology
The 12 scr graduate Certificate in Epidemiology focuses on the development of the qualitative and quantitative knowledge and skills to collect, organize, analyze, and interpret data associated with epidemiologic investigations, health surveys, injury and illness recognition, and human exposure assessment. NOCPH MPH students may not take this certificate concurrently while earning the MPH.

CURRICULUM

Certificate in Epidemiology students take the following courses.

·         PUBH 600/800 - Biostatistics
·         PUBH 601/801 - Public Health Epidemiology
·         PUBH 603/803 - Advanced Epidemiology
·         PUBH 606/806 - Advanced Biostatistics

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Student learning objectives for the Certificate in Epidemiology:

·         Select and apply appropriate biostatistical and epidemiological methods and interpret basic and applied research data
·         Define and calculate measures of disease frequency and measures of association between risk factors and disease
·         Describe the major epidemiologic research study designs and their advantages and limitations
·         Define the basic terms and apply methods used in outbreak investigation, infectious disease epidemiology, chronic disease epidemiology, disease prevention trials, and evaluation of screening tests
·         Review the scientific literature with competence, synthesize findings across studies, and make appropriate public health recommendations based on current knowledge
·         Design an epidemiologic study to address a question of interest
·         Write a clear description of the rationale, methods, results, and interpretation of an epidemiologic investigation.
·         Apply epidemiologic skills in a clinical or public health setting, specifically in the formulation or application of health-related programs or policies

 

page top

Certificate in Global Public Health

The 15 scr graduate Certificate in Global Public Health will contribute to the development of public health practitioners who understand disparities in health and well-being in underdeveloped regions of the world, and who can develop effective programs to reduce such inequalities and improve the lives of the impoverished. NOCPH MPH students may take this certificate concurrently while earning their MPH.

CURRICULUM

Certificate in Global Public Health students (non-MPH majors) take the following courses.

·         PUBH 503 - Issues in Global Health
·         PUBH 612 - Infectious Disease Epidemiology
·         PUBH 655 - Chronic Disease Epidemiology
·         PUBH 697/684 - Scholarly Project (supervised global public health project in an international setting or extensive literature analysis of a topic related to global public health)
·         Advised elective

Certificate in Global Public Health students (MPH majors) take the following courses.

·         PUBH 503 - Issues in Global Health
·         PUBH 612 - Infectious Disease Epidemiology or PUBH 655 - Chronic Disease Epidemiology
·         PUBH 697/684 - Scholarly Project (supervised global public health project in an international setting or extensive literature analysis of a topic related to global public health)

 

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Student learning objectives for the Certificate in Global Public Health:

·         Summarize the major types and magnitude of global health and environmental problems in developing nations
·         Describe the roles of government, globalization, politics, war, famine, disaster, climate change, migration, and other factors on the health, environment, and
well-being of people of developing nations
·         Summarize the different roles of large and small organizations and institutions in addressing global health problems
·         Develop and apply effective programs, methods, and approaches to improve global health and the environment
·         Appreciate the cultural differences between Americans and developing nations and be sensitive to other cultures

 

page top

Certificate in Occupational Health

The 15 scr graduate Certificate in Occupational Health provides education and training focused on scientific, technical, regulatory, and administrative principles and practices for preventing and controlling worker and community exposures to physical (e.g., noise, radiation), chemical (e.g., toxic), and biological (e.g., infectious, allergenic, intoxicating) agents and ergonomic factors that can cause human illness. The profession focuses on prevention of exposure or occurrence and mitigation of factors and agents that contribute to illness and jury to workers and other members of the community. Occupational health professionals also have the education and training applicable to preparedness for, and response to natural disaster and intentional terrorist events. NOCPH MPH students may take this certificate concurrently while earning their MPH, except for ENVH majors.

CURRICULUM

Certificate in Occupational Health students take the following courses.

·         PUBH 502 - Occupational Health - Science, Regulations, and Management
·         PUBH 531 - Chemical Agents - Toxicity, Evaluation, and Control
·         PUBH 541 - Air Contaminant Modeling, Ventilation, and Respiratory Protection
·         PUBH 562 - Physical Agents - Effects, Evaluation, and Control
·         One of the following five courses
o    PUBH 506 - Occupational Safety - Science, Regulations, and Management
o    PUBH 516 - Environmental Health Science, Regulations, and Management
o    PUBH 526 - Hazardous Materials and Emergency Response
o    PUBH 600 - Biostatistics
o    PUBH 601 - Public Health Epidemiology 

STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Student learning objectives for the Certificate in Occupational Health:

·         Identify agents, factors, and stressors generated by and/or associated with defined sources, unit operations, and/or processes
·         Describe qualitative and quantitative aspects of generation of agents, factors, and stressors
·         Describe physiological and/or toxicological interactions of physical, chemical, biological, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors with the human body
·         Recommend and evaluate engineering, administrative, and personal protective equipment controls and/or other interventions to reduce and eliminate hazards
·         Demonstrate an understanding of applicable business and managerial practices
·         Interpret and apply applicable occupational and environmental regulations

 

page top

Certificate in Public Health and Emergency Response

The 12 scr graduate Certificate in Public Health and Emergency Response focuses on the characteristics and human health impacts of biological, chemical, and radiological agents; personal protective equipment and decontamination; site monitoring instrumentation and methods; epidemiological investigation and surveillance; and , applicable regulatory standards and recommended professional guidelines for incident recognition, response, and control.

CURRICULUM

Certificate in Public Health and Emergency Response students take the following courses.

·         PUBH 526 - Hazardous Materials and Emergency Response
·         PUBH 600 - Biostatistics
·         PUBH 601 - Public Health Epidemiology
·         One of the following five courses
o    PUBH 531 - Chemical Agents - Toxicity, Evaluation, and Control
o    PUBH 552 - Biological Agents - Pathogenicity, Evaluation, and Control
o    PUBH 570 - Risk Assessment, Management, and Communication
o    PUBH 603 - Advanced Epidemiology
o    PUBH 612 - Infectious Disease Epidemiology


STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Student learning objectives for the Certificate in Public Health and Emergency Response:

·         Apply fundamental and advanced principles of statistics, epidemiology, environmental health science, and occupational health science to real-world public health issues and problems

·         Objectively and subjectively assess chemical, biological, and physical agents classified as hazardous to humans health (including terrorism agents)

·         Conduct fundamental sample collection of media contaminated with hazardous chemical, biological, and physical agents

·         Critically analyze and interpret statistical, epidemiological, toxicological, and communicable disease information for prevention and remediation program development and implementation

·         Collect and evaluate applicable information to conduct disaster preparation/planning

 

page top

Certificate in Contemporary Gerontological Practice

Barbara Kopp-Miller, Ph.D., chair

The Graduate Certificate in Contemporary Gerontological Practice at the University of Toledo is designed to provide knowledge about contemporary issues in gerontology and geriatrics and prepare individuals for working with older adults and their families in the current health care system.

A unique feature of the Certificate Program is the delivery system. Recognizing that individuals continually balance personal and professional responsibilities, the courses will be accessible "24/7" through distance education methods.  The 5 course curriculum is focused on meeting the educational needs of health care professionals and students through effective and innovative educational methods.

Curriculum

Semester I - Fall

Course                    Course Name                                                                               Credit Hours

GERO540               Health and Aging                                                                                   3
GERO541               Issues in Contemporary Gerontological Practice                                   3

Semester II - Spring

Course                    Course Name                                                                               Credit Hours

GERO542              Grief and Bereavement Issues in Older Adulthood                                3
GERO543              Funding and Resource Generation for Older Adult Programming         3

Semester III - Fall, Summer, Spring

Course                    Course Name                                                                               Credit Hours

GERO544               Guided Independent Study in Gerontological Practice
(Offered Fall, Spring and Summer)                                                  3

Admission Requirements

Students are admitted for Fall or Spring semesters. The application deadline is November 1 for Spring admission and June 15 for Fall admission. To be considered for admittance into the program, a candidate must:

•          Hold a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university with a minimum 3.0 undergraduate grade point average. Degrees in progress will be considered. Official transcripts are required;
•          Submit 2 online letters of recommendation
•          Submit a completed online application and  the accompanying application fee.

Only online applications through the College of Graduate Studies are accepted.

Students who are currently enrolled in a program at the University of Toledo may apply to the Graduate Certificate Program by submitting an online application for admission and 2 online letters of recommendation.  The student must be in good standing in his or her current degree program.  (The accompanying application fee is waived.)

 

page top

Certificate in Medical and Health Science Teaching and Learning

Constance Shriner, Ph.D., chair

Description: The graduate certificate program Medical Health and Science Education focuses on the fundamentals of teaching and learning. It is a multi-disciplinary, longitudinal curriculum focused on the development of knowledge and skills in the areas of teaching and assessing learners in health and medical science disciplines. The program is open to students pursing the PhD degree in areas of biomedical or health sciences, MD students, and faculty members responsible for teaching courses in medicine, biomedical, and/or health sciences.   

Rationale:  There is a need to better prepare PhD and MD students intending to pursue careers in academe that will involve teaching as one area of responsibility. In relation, it is common for faculty members already in academe who  despite a high level of competence in the medical health and science professions have limited or no formal education and training relative to teaching and assessing learners. Completion of this certificate will help address the increased need for the applicable education and training.

Delivery: The 13-credit graduate certificate program is offered via a combination of conventional classroom and web-based modes. 

Program Contact:     

Dr. Constance Shriner
University of Toledo College of Medicine
(constance.shriner@utoledo.edu)

Required Core Courses (10 credits)                                                                                                                                        Credits

FACD 635  Teaching and Learning in Health and Medical Sciences (Fall ’08)                                                             3
FACD 625  Learning and Instructional Theories Applied to Health Science Education (Spring ’09)                            3
FACD 670  Teaching Improvement Practicum       (variable terms; prerequisite FACD 635)                                                       1      
FACD 697  Teaching and Learning Project (variable terms; prerequisite FACD 635 and 625)                                    3

Advised Elective Course (3 credits)                                                                                                                                         3

Select one approved elective course related to:
Educational Leadership (College of Education)
Nursing Education (College of Nursing)
Educational Research in Health/Medical Science Education (College of Medicine)

                                                                                                                                                                        TOTAL           13 Semester Credits

Admission Requirements:

Maximum enrollment six students for academic year 2008-09
Completed application form
Official transcript of bachelor, medical, or graduate degree
$45 Application Fee (waived for MD and PhD students)
Minimum Grade Point Average 3.0/4.0
One letter of recommendation from advisor (PhD and MD students) or department chairperson (faculty member)

 

page top

Certificate in Sophomore Medical Student Pathology

Amira Gohara, Ph.D., chair

Pathology for Post-Second Year Medical Students Certificate

“Pre-Clinical Pathology Fellowship”

Admission Requirements

·         Successful completion of a second year medical school curriculum from an LCME accredited medical school with grades equivalent to a GPA ≥ 3.0.
·         GRE exam not required

Core Courses

Course #

Course Title

Credits

Fall

 

 

PATH606

Introduction to Surgical Pathology & Cytology

2

PATH607

Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Medicine

2

PATH608

Introduction to Postmortem Pathology

2

PATH689

Independent Study in Pathology

1

Spring

PATH606

Introduction to Surgical Pathology & Cytology

2

PATH607

Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Medicine

2

PATH608

Introduction to Postmortem Pathology

2

PATH689

Independent Study in Pathology

1

Summer

PATH606

Introduction to Surgical Pathology & Cytology

2

PATH607

Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Medicine

2

PATH608

Introduction to Postmortem Pathology

2

Students from LCME accredited medical schools who have completed their second year and are in good academic standing are eligible to apply for this program.  While the American Board of Pathology gives up to 1 year credit toward certification for time spent as a Fellow, the Fellowship is not limited to those planning to make pathology a career.

Student Learning Objectives

At the end of the fellowship, the students will be able to:

Autopsy Service

·         perform a complete autopsy including evisceration, dissection and examination of the various organs including brain
·         describe grossly and microscopically all organs from a given autopsy and provide a clinicopathologic correlation as to the cause of death

Surgical Pathology

·         Perform gross and microscopic examinations on surgical specimens
·         cut, stain and review frozen sections
·         interpret frozen sections
·         interpret gross and microscopic surgical pathology specimens

Clinical Pathology

·         interpret peripheral blood smears
·         provide clinicopathologic correlations for chemistry, microbiology and immunology tests
·         perform phlebotomies on in- and out-patients

Electives and Scholarly Activities

·         analyze scientific articles
·         interpret EM specimens
·         prepare and present scientific papers at annual scientific day

Teaching

·         teach second year medical school labs

Assessment

Data Collection

Data Review Process

Evaluation instrument / Source of Data

Internal/external Direct/indirect

Frequency of data collection

Who analyzes and reviews the data?

How often?

Student Assessment

 

 

 

1.      by direct observation

Monthly

Director

Monthly

2.      student evaluation and feedback on teaching labs

Monthly

Director

Monthly

3.      oral presentations

Weekly

Director

Monthly

4.      scientific day activities

Annually

Director

Annually

5.      tumor board and other conferences oral presentation

Weekly

Director

Monthly

6.      lab rotations

Monthly

Director

Monthly

7.      autopsy write-up

Monthly

Director

Monthly

8.      research forum presentations

When presented

Director

Annually

9.      publications and abstracts

When published

Director

Annually

10.  journal club

When presented

Director

Quarterly

11.  presentations at external mtgs

When attended

Director

Annually

12.  graduate exit interview

Annually

Director

Annually

Program Assessment

 

 

 

1.      monthly new innovation eval tool through the GME office

Monthly

Director

Monthly

2.      evaluation of individual faculty members

Monthly

Director

Monthly

 

 

Last Updated: 6/26/15