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Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service

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Graduate Programs

The Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service (JHCEHSHS) offers flexible programs leading to a range of master’s, education specialist, and doctoral degrees in both academic and professiounal fields. The Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service collaborates with other colleges in the university and with the Northwest Ohio Consortium for Public Health to offer specialized degrees. All students are encouraged to discuss academic programs with graduate faculty in their respective departments.

Admission to Graduate Programs

Program specific requirements are described under the individual graduate programs. General graduate program admission requirements are described in a prior section of the College of Graduate Studies. Admission to graduate study in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service is open to graduates of accredited colleges and universities meeting the minimum admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies as well as any additional, specific admission requirements of the college, department, and/or program.

Previously admitted students wishing to transfer to a different program within the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service must apply for admission to the new program. Admission to one program does not guarantee admission to another program.

Administration of Programs

All graduate programs in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service are administered jointly by the college and the College of Graduate Studies of The University of Toledo. Students should visit the program website and/or contact specific programs for further information on admission requirements or programs. The Associate Dean for Graduate Affairs coordinates graduate policies within the college.

Advising

Students are assigned a faculty member for the purpose of advising and developing a plan of study. It is the student’s responsibility to meet all requirements for the degree as specified by the graduate program, the department, the College of Graduate Studies and The University of Toledo. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the plan of study and other required forms, in consultation with their advisors, during the first semester of matriculation.

GRADUATE DEGREES in JHCEHSHS

A list of degree programs offered in the JHCEHSHS is below. To the right of each degree is the department that offers that degree program. Program descriptions are provided in the information under each department.

Master’s Degree Programs                                                          DEPARTMENT                                                                                                 

Master of Arts and Education                                                       Curriculum and Instruction 

      Education and anthropology  
      Education and classics 
      Education and economics         
      Education and English  
      English as a second language (ESL)  
      Education and French     
      Education and geography       
      Education and German     
      Education and history     
      Education and mathematics  
      Education and political science    
      Education and sociology                           
      Education and Spanish                                

Master of Arts in Counselor Education                                         Sch Psy, Legal Specialties & Counselor Ed                       
 
Clinical Mental Health Counseling      
  School Counseling

 Master of Arts in Criminal Justice                                                  Criminal Justice and Social Work        
also offered: joint MA in Criminal Justice/Juris Doctor                                                                                                

 Master of Arts in Recreation and Leisure Studies                         Health and Recreation Professions     

Recreation administration  
Recreational therapy      
Recreational therapy and therapeutic arts     

 Master of Arts in School Psychology                                              Sch Psy, Legal Specialties & Counselor Ed

 Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology                              Rehabilitation Sciences     

Master of Education                                                                                                                                                        

      Art education                                                                               Curriculum and Instruction  
      Career and technical education                                                      Curriculum and Instruction  
      Curriculum and instruction                                                            Curriculum and Instruction  
      Early childhood education PreK-3                                                   Early Child, Physical & Special Ed      
      Educational administration and supervision                                     Educational Found & Leadership         
      Educational psychology                                                                 Educational Found & Leadership         
      Educational research and measurement                                          Educational Found & Leadership         
      Educational technology                                                                 Curriculum and Instruction  
      Educational theory and social foundations                                       Educational Found & Leadership         
      Health education                                                                           Health and Recreation Professions      
      Higher education                                                                           Educational Found & Leadership         
      Middle childhood education (LAMP only)                                          Curriculum and Instruction  
      Physical education                                                                         Early Child, Physical & Special Ed      
      School health education with school nurse licensure                         Health and Recreation Professions      
      Secondary education (LAMP only)                                                   Curriculum and Instruction  
      Special education                                                                          Early Child, Physical & Special Ed      
                                                                                                            Curriculum and Instruction

Master of Music Education                                                                                                   
Music education Dept. of Music, College of Visual and Performing Arts                        

 Master of Public Health: Health Promotion and Education Program            Health and Recreation Professions     

 Master of Science and Education                                                                    Curriculum and Instruction 

      Education and biology      
      Education and chemistry    
      Education and geology        
      Education and mathematics     
      Education and physics        

 Master of Science in Exercise Science                                                             Kinesiology

      Applied biomechanics                                                                                                                                                  
      Clinical kinesiology                                                                                                                                                       
      Exercise physiology                                                                                                                                                      
      Athletic training                                                                                                                                                            

Master of Social Work                                                                                         Criminal Justice and Social Work       

Educational Specialist Degree Programs                                                                       DEPARTMENT

Educational Specialist in Administration and Supervision                                        Educational Found & Leadership      
Educational Specialist in Curriculum and Instruction                                              Curriculum and Instruction 
Educational Specialist in School Psychology                                                            Sch Psy Legal Specialties & Coun Ed        

Doctoral Degree Programs                                                                                              DEPARTMENT

Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education                                                 School Psychology, Legal Specialties 
                                                                                                                        and Counselor Education                                           
 

Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Science                                                        Kinesiology                       

Doctor of Philosophy in Health Education                                                        Health and Recreation Professions     

 Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Education
   in Curriculum and Instruction with concentrations in:

      Curriculum and instruction                                                                             Curriculum and Instruction  
      Educational media                                                                                         Curriculum and Instruction  
      Elementary                                                                                                   Early Child, Physical & Special Ed      
      Gifted and talented (Ph.D. only)                                                                     Early Child, Physical & Special Ed      
      Secondary                                                                                                    Curriculum and Instruction  
      Special education                                                                                          Early Child, Physical & Special Ed     

 Doctor of Education in Educational Administration and Supervision              Educational Found & Leadership        

 Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Education in Foundations
of Education with concentrations in:                                                                 
Educational Found & Leadership       

      Educational psychology
         Areas of focus may include learning/cognition or human development                                                                   
      Educational sociology
      Foundations of education
      History of education
      Philosophy of education
      Research and measurement
         Areas of focus may include statistics, measurement, or evaluation
      Higher education (Ph.D. only)

Doctor of Physical Therapy                                                                                   Rehabilitation Sciences     

Occupational Therapy Doctorate                                                                           Rehabilitation Sciences     

Endorsements

  Adaptive Physical Education                                                                                 Early Child, Physical & Special Ed
  Career-Tech Worksite Coordinator                                                                        Curriculum and Instruction
  Career-Tech Worksite Teacher/Coordinator                                                           Curriculum and Instruction
  Career-Based Intervention                                                                                   Curriculum and Instruction
  Early Childhood Generalist                                                                                   Early Child, Physical & Special Ed
  Literacy Specialist                                                                                               Curriculum and Instruction
  Reading (PreK-12)                                                                                               Curriculum and Instruction
  Teaching English as a Second Language (PreK-12)                                                  Curriculum and Instruction
   Transition to Work                                                                                               Early Child, Physical & Special Ed

Licensure Alternative Master’s Degrees 

Graduate Certificates                                                                                                            DEPARTMENT

      Elder Law Certificate                                                                                                Sch Psy, Legal Spec & Counselor Ed  
      Juvenile Justice                                                                                                       Criminal Justice and Social Work        
      Patient Advocacy Certificate                                                                                     Sch Psy, Legal Spec & Counselor Ed 

Department of
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
LEIGH CHIARELOTT, chair

Master’s, specialist and doctoral degrees are housed within this department. In addition, graduate licensure programs in Middle Childhood Education, Adolescent and Young Adult Education, Career and Technical Education and Foreign Language Education as well as special programs in Literacy and Educational Technology are available.

Admission to Master’s Degree Programs

In addition to the College of Graduate Studies admission requirements, master’s programs housed in the department of Curriculum and Instruction (CI) require the following:

 An overall grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.7 on a 4.0 scale in all undergraduate work. Students who fail to meet this requirement may be considered for provisional admission, provided they demonstrate excellent promise for graduate study.

 Three letters of recommendation regarding the prospective graduate student's potential for doing master's level work, which may come from such sources as the undergraduate major adviser, current employer, school principal or others who are knowledgeable about the applicant’s ability to engage in graduate work in the desired program.

 A well-written statement describing the students' background and goals as well as the importance of the degree In achieving those goals.

 Some programs have selective admissions and may admit a limited number of students. Thus, meeting all formal criteria does not guarantee admission.

Requirements for Master’s Degree Programs

Master’s programs housed in the department of Curriculum and Instruction require a minimum of 30 or 36 semester hours (depending on program) of approved graduate course work. No more than six semester hours of credit from any combination of workshops (5950), problems or special topics courses (5980 or 6980), and independent studies (5990 or 6990) may be included in the degree program.

Programs leading to licensure or endorsement may require additional semester hours to fulfill the licensure credential as well as degree requirements.

Licensure Alternative Master’s Program (LAMP)

The Licensure Alternative Master's Program (LAMP) is a unique program for providing an initial license for those individuals who are seeking a career change and are interested in becoming teachers. The LAMP provides a sequence of courses applicable to teacher licensure from the State of Ohio and may be combined with an appropriate master’s degree. Licensure may be obtained in the following areas: Adolescent education (grades 7-12), middle childhood education (grades 4-9), art education (grades K-12) and music education (grades K-12). The program is designed to provide the student with opportunities to spend time in school settings and to put these experiences into perspective through on-campus reflective seminars.

Admission requirements for Licensure Alternative Master's Program:

All applicants must have a minimum 2.7 overall undergraduate GPA and a minimum 2.7 GPA in the licensure area. Other admission requirements may include (but are not limited to) application, writing samples, interviews, and recommendation letters. Students must be fully admitted to the College of Graduate Studies to be eligible. Students must consult with the appropriate LAMP adviser prior to applying.

LAMP (Licensure Alternative Master's Program) in Middle Grades (MGE) and Adolescent/Young Adult Education

LAMP is a highly selective master's program that combines licensure in the middle grades (grades 4-9) with a master's degree in Middle Childhood Education (MIDD) or licensure in adolescent/young adult education (grades 7-12) with a master's degree in Secondary Education (SECE). The LAMP program in these two master's degree with licensure areas is a one calendar year (August to August) full-time cohort-based program. Please see the LAMP website link from the Curriculum and Instruction web page for further details on both programs. Application deadline for this LAMP program is April 1st.

Licensure at the Graduate Level (LGL) program

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction also offers programs in Middle Grade (MGE) and Adolescent/Young Adult (AYA) Education for those persons whose primary interest is in obtaining licensure in MGE (grades 4-9) or AYA (grades 7-12) within their content area specialties. This program can be completed on a part-time basis, and students can be admitted at any time during the calendar year. Students may also receive a master's degree in Middle Childhood Education (MIDD) or Secondary Education (SECE) while completing licensure requirements by taking additional coursework. Coursework for the master's degree must be completed within six years. Please see the LGL website link from the Curriculum and Instruction web page for further details on this program.

LAMP programs in Art Education and Music Education

Licensure in both art education and music education are available for persons with appropriate fine arts backgrounds. 


Master of Arts and Education


 

This degree program is offered by the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service in collaboration with the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences. This degree is designed for students who wish to enhance their knowledge in a humanities or social sciences field and in education. As a general rule, students will have an adviser in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service and in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences who will jointly plan and direct the program. Students who wish to complete their culminating experience in education will work with their Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service adviser. Students who wish to complete their culminating experience in their humanities or social sciences field will work with their College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences adviser.

A.    Foundations core.......................................................................... 12

     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

  • Curriculum : CI 6800, CI 6810, CI 6830, CI 6840, CI 5860, CI 5870 or SPED 5000

B.     Specialization ............................................................................... 21

Select a minimum of 15 semester hours in one of the following areas:

anthropology, classics, economics, English, English as a second language, French, German, history, political science, sociology or Spanish.

See College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences for specific course requirements. Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.     Seminar, project, or thesis .............................................................. 3

The master of arts and education ordinarily requires licensure as a prerequisite.

 

Master of Education in Art Education (LAMP available)

A.    Foundations core......................................................................... 12

     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

        •   Curriculum: AED 5500 or 5320

B.     Specialization .............................................................................. 21

        AED 5000, 5320 or 5500 and 18 hours........................................ 3

        Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser............... 18

C.     Culminating experience............................................................... 3

        AED 5000, 6920, 6940 or 6960

Requirements for initial teacher licensure may be met as part of the M.Ed. degree. See the description of the Licensure Alternative Master’s Program (LAMP) section. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

 

Master of Education in Career and Technical Education

A.    Foundations core (see general requirements)................................ 12

     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

        •    Curriculum: CTE 5160 , 5830, or 6900

B.     Specialization............................................................................... 15

        Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.     Project, thesis or practicum............................................................ 3

        CTE 6920, 6960, or 5940

 

Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction

A.    Foundations core........................................................................... 12

     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

  • Curriculum: CI 6800, CI 6810, CI 6830, CI 6840, CI 5860, CI 5870, or SPED 5000

B.     Specialization   ............................................................................. 12
       
Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.     Theory and Research Requirement

        CI 6490, 6590, 6690, 6790, or 5980............................................... 3

D.    Seminar, project or thesis................................................................ 3

        CI 6900, 6920 or 6960

 

Master of Education in Educational Technology and Performance Technology

A.   Foundations core .......................................................................... 12

     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230,

      5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

             Curriculum: ETPT 5100

B.   Specialization................................................................................. 15

      Areas of focus may include instructional technology, educational
      computing or instructional design.
     
Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Seminar, project, practicum, or thesis.............................................. 3

      ETPT 6900, 6930, 6940, or 6960  

 

Master of Education in Middle Childhood Education (LAMP only)

A.   Foundations core............................................................................ 12

     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

      •     .............................................................. Curriculum: SPED 5000

B.   Specialization.................................................................................. 12

      Areas of focus can be English/language arts, mathematics, science,

      or social studies. Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Theory and research requirement..................................................... 3

CI 6490, 6590, 6690 or 6790

D.   Seminar, project or thesis................................................................. 3

CI 6900, 6920 or 6960

Most requirements for initial teacher licensure may be met as part of the M.Ed. degree. See the description of the Licensure Alternative Master’s Program (LAMP) section. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

 

Master of Education in Secondary Education (Adolescent/Young Adult Education, LAMP only)

A.   Foundations core .......................................................................... 12

     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

  • Curriculum: CI 6800, CI 6810, CI 6830, CI 6840, CI 5860, CI 5870 or SPED 5000

B.   Specialization................................................................................. 15

      Areas of focus can be English/language arts, mathematics, science, or social studies.

      Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Theory and research requirement..................................................... 3

CI 6490, 6590, 6690 or 6790

D.   Seminar, project or thesis................................................................. 3

CI 6900, 6920 or 6960

Most requirements for initial teacher licensure may be met as part of the M.Ed. degree. See the description of the Licensure Alternative Master’s Program (LAMP) section. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

Master of Music in Music Education

A.   Foundations core .......................................................................... 12

Curriculum core must be MED 536

B. Specialization ...................................................................................... 21

 

MUS 5900, MUS 5340 MED 5370, Music Ensembles (2 hours), Music Electives
Courses must be approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Project or thesis (choose one).......................................................... 3

        MED 6920 or 6960

Students will be required to pass comprehensive written and oral examinations, normally given during the last semester of work.

Requirements for Initial teacher licensure may be met as part of the M.Ed. degree. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

Master of Science and Education

This degree program is offered by the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service in collaboration with the College of Natural Science and Mathematics. The degree is designed for students who wish to enhance their knowledge in a science field or in mathematics and in education. As a general rule, students will have an adviser in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service and in the College of Natural Science and Mathematics who will jointly plan and direct the program. Students who wish to complete their culminating experience in education will work with their Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service adviser. Students who wish to complete their culminating experience in their science field or mathematics will work with their College of Natural Science and Mathematics adviser.

A.   Foundations core ........................................................................... 12

     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

    Curriculum: CI 6800, CI 6810, CI 6830, CI 6840, CI 5860,CI 5870 or SPED 5000

B.   *Specialization................................................................................ 21

             Select a minimum of 15 semester hours in biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics or physics

             * Refer to Graduate Programs in College of Natural Science and Mathematics for specific course requirements for dual degree programs.

             Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Project or thesis ............................................................................... 3

The master of science and education ordinarily requires licensure as a prerequisite.

 

Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) Degree Programs

Educational specialist (Ed.S.) degree is available through a post-master’s graduate program that provides students an area of educational specialization with emphasis on practice. Specific areas represented are curriculum and instruction, educational technology, elementary education, secondary education, and career and technical education.

The Ed.S. in curriculum and instruction is designed to meet the needs of individuals involved with the curriculum, teaching, and supervision aspects of discipline-centered areas of study. The degree provides patterns of study for teachers and supervisors who want an education beyond the master’s degree as a specialist, but who are not interested in a doctoral degree. For the program and requirements of a specific area, contact a faculty adviser.


Admission to Educational Specialist Degree Programs


 

Admission requirements to the Ed.S. programs include a bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year institution and a master’s degree from an accredited institution.

       The letters of recommendation are expected from academic professionals to support the applicant's ability and character to succeed in the graduate degree.

  • A statement of purpose is required to demonstrate writing ability and to describe the applicant’s goals and how the educational specialist degree supports those goals.

Requirements for Educational Specialist Programs

       Completion of a minimum of 32 semester hours of approved graduate coursework beyond the master’s level with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

       Students are required to develop a plan of study with their adviser that specifies the coursework that must be completed to fulfill degree requirements. This plan must be filed prior to the completion of 15 semester hours and must be approved by the adviser, the department chairperson, and the college associate dean for graduate affairs.

       All course work for the Ed.S. must be taken within a six-year periodimmediatelypreceding the date the degree is awarded.

       Programs require the completion of a culminating experience, which may include field experiences, internships, or other professional projects.

       No more than a total of six semester hours of credit from any combination of workshops (7950), problems or special topics courses (7980) or independent studies (7990 or 8990) may be applied to a specialist’s program.

Doctoral Degree Programs

The department offers a doctoral degree with concentrations in curriculum and instruction, educational media and secondary education. In addition, these doctoral programs are also available as minor areas of study to support other programs. Students should discuss these alternatives with their advisers.

Admission to Doctoral Programs

Individuals applying for admission to doctoral study must meet the admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies as well as specific program requirements.

       Acceptable GRE scores with 1050 or above preferred.

       Evidence in prerequisite academic work that the applicant can successfully complete the doctoral program in the area of study.

       An autobiographical sketch that describes why the applicant wishes to pursue the selected doctoral program.This sketch also should include information on previous study, educational experience, professional accomplishments, immediate and future professional goals, a proposed time schedule for completing the degree, and any other information that the applicant believes is relevant for admission into the desired program.

       Evidence of research and writing ability, if required by the doctoral program. Such evidence may include a master’s thesis, proctored writing sample, a written research report, one or more reprints of publications, a paper presented to a professional society, or similar evidence of competence in this respect.

Requirements for Doctoral Programs

A minimum of 60 hours beyond the master's degree is required. Each doctoral student is expected to:

       Identify a concentration in one area of specialization (i.e., a major) and pass a written examination (major examination) that covers the major area of concentration;

       Demonstrate proficiency in tools of research;

       Depending on the program, pass a separate written examination for each minor area of concentration;

       After passing the written major examination and any written minor examination, pass an oral examination that covers the relevant coursework;

       Present dissertation proposal;

       Present and defend a completed dissertation in a public forum.

Academic Advising Committee

The student is assigned a temporary adviser upon admission to a program. This adviser guides the student in forming a doctoral program committee.

The doctoral program committee shall be formed before the student completes 18 hours of credit. The doctoral program committee has a minimum of three members who are selected from the membership of the graduate faculty of the University. The doctoral program committee is responsible for assisting the student in the development of a plan of study and assuring competence by overseeing the doctoral major exam, any minor exam(s) and doctoral program orals.

The plan of study must be approved by the doctoral program committee, the department chairperson, and the associate dean for graduate affairs of the college. The plan of study must be filed before 18 semester hours of the doctoral program are completed. After completion of the academic requirements, the student must form a dissertation committee to guide the development of the dissertation.

The dissertation committee must include a minimum of four graduate faculty members including one who is not in the discipline major. The student must work closely with the committee to develop a research proposal for the dissertation. Once the committee approves the research design, the student must obtain Institutional Research Board approval before beginning the research study. A public defense of the dissertation is required.

Licensure Programs

Adolescent and Young Adult (7-12)
Art Education (multi-age)
Foreign Language (multi-age)
Middle Grade (4-9)
Music Education (multi-age)

Endorsements

 Career-Based Intervention
 Career-Tech Worksite Coordinator
 Career-Tech Worksite Teacher/Coordinator
 Literacy Specialist
 Reading (PreK-12)
Teaching English as a Second Language

Department of
CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND SOCIAL WORK
MORRIS JENKINS, chair

The department of criminal justice and social work offers individual master's degrees in each of the professions. A certificate in juvenile justice is available in association with the master's degree in criminal justice.

Criminal Justice Program

The department of criminal justice and social work offers a graduate program leading to a master of arts in criminal justice as well as an optional certificate in juvenile justice. In addition, the department of criminal justice and social work with the College of Law offers a joint degree program leading to the master of arts in criminal justice and the juris doctor.

Master of Arts in Criminal Justice

The master of arts in criminal justice is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the criminal justice system, social control and the nature of crime, in addition to developing and improving skills necessary to critically assess criminal justice problems and develop meaningful responses to these problems. The program also provides students with the skills to conduct applied research and evaluation, as well as the ability to understand empirical scholarly publications. The program allows students to develop a plan of study that will help prepare for leadership roles in the field of criminal justice and to pursue criminal justice doctoral studies. The program allows a person to be either a full-time or part-time student. A full-time student can complete the program in one year, while a part-time student should be able to complete the program in two or three years.

Admission

In addition to the College of Graduate Studies and Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service requirements, evaluation of applicants for the criminal justice graduate program is based on the following criteria:

  • application
  • three letters of recommendation
  • personal statement
  • official transcripts
  • GPA of 3.0 or above on a 4 point scale is preferred; GPA of at least 2.7 on a 4 point scale will be considered on a case by case basis
  • Applicants with less than 2.70 must take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

Meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee entrance into the program. Admission is competitive and is dependent on the availability of space within the program. Under special circumstances, the graduate admissions committee may choose to admit a promising applicant as a provisional student in the program.

Program of Study

The master of arts in criminal justice requires a minimum of 33 semester hours including core and elective course work. Students should meet with the director of the graduate program in criminal justice to develop a plan of study. Any electives taken outside of criminal justice must be preapproved by the director of the graduate program in criminal justice. A student may complete a thesis or must pass a comprehensive exam to earn the degree. Within the first semester of graduate study, a student may elect to complete a thesis in lieu of 3 credit hours of elective course work.

Program of study for the master of arts in criminal justice

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Year

1

CRIM6100 Metro Problems 3

CRIM5200 Data Analysis 3

CRIM4600 Research Methods 3

CRIM Elective in CRIM 3

 Total 12 hours

 

CRIM6420 Adv. Criminal Procedures 3

CRIM6000 Adv. Criminal Justice Theories 3

*Elective in CRIM 3

*Elective 3

*Elective 3

 Total 15 hours

*Elective in CRIM 3

*Elective 3

 

 

 

Total 6 hours

*Note: A maximum of 9 hours of elective work must be done in graduate level Criminal Justice courses. A maximum of 9 hours may be done in graduate level course work outside of CJ with pre-approval of the graduate advisor.

Joint M.A. in Criminal Justice/Juris Doctor

This program is administered jointly by the College of Law and the criminal justice program. The program is designed for students who wish to have theoretical and practice knowledge in the law and in the field of criminal justice.

Admissions

  • Be accepted by the University of Toledo College of Law
  • Successfully complete of the first year of law school
  • Be a student in good standing at the University of Toledo College of Law
  • Complete an application for the master of arts in criminal justice

Program of Study

To complete the master of arts in criminal justice, the student must meet the degree requirements. Students in the joint program may substitute a law school course in criminal procedures for the core course CRIM 6420. Additionally, nine hours of law courses may be applied as electives in the master of arts in criminal justice.

To qualify for the juris doctor degree, a student must comply with all the academic and non-academic rules of the College of Law. Under the joint program, up to 12 semester hours taken for the master of arts in criminal justice may be applied toward the completion of credit hours for juris doctor degree. The student must earn a grade of B or better in those courses to be credited toward the juris doctor.

Social Work Program

The department of criminal justice and social work offers the professional master of social work degree (MSW). The graduate program in social work is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Master of Social Work

The master of social work degree has an advanced generalist perspective, preparing students to create change at all system levels, from individuals to communities. Students may select a concentration in either mental health or in child and family services.

An advanced standing program exists for students who meet specific criteria including a baccalaureate social work degree from an undergraduate social work program accredited by CSWE. Students with related degrees will not be admitted under advanced standing status.

Admission

In addition to the admission criteria established by the College of Graduate Studies at The University of Toledo, the applicant to the MSW program must submit

  • three letters of recommendation from both employers and prior faculty members
  • a personal statement that speaks to her/his commitment to social and economic justice as well as the applicant’s professional goals over the next 10 years

Additional requirements for admission mission to the advanced standing program include

  • a baccalaureate degree in social work from a CSW-accredited social work program
  • minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0
  • minimum GPA of 3.3 in the social work program

Since the program is not designed to prepare graduates for work in private practice, an applicant indicating that private practice is his/her professional goal will be advised to consider other programs, such as counselor education at UT that will be better suited to meet this goal.

The personal statement and references from both employers and prior faculty members will be evaluated for a “fit” with the social work profession and our program’s focus on social and economic justice. Applicants must convey their adherence to the values and ethics of the profession. Applicants with no evidence of the above will not be admitted to the program.

The Council on Social Work Education does not permit programs to provide course credit for work experience. It is our hope that each class admitted would have a mixture of students who have experience as well as those without extensive professional experience. We encourage diversity among the students accepted to the program. This includes diversity of gender, age, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, ability and experience in the profession, etc. Prospective applicants are urged to review information on the program website.

Program of Study

The complete MSW Program requires 60 semester hours for graduation that is consistent with MSW programs across the country. Foundation course work is offered in the first year of the program and advanced course work in the second year.

Students must enroll in 16 credit hours of field education to obtain the required 900 hours required by CSWE. Six (6) of these hours are taken during the foundation year and ten (10) during the advanced year. While every effort is made to accommodate students with full-time jobs, applicants to the program must be aware that field placements primarily take place during business hours. We are unable to guarantee a night or weekend field placement.

Students who are awarded admission with advanced standing must complete 33 credit hours to obtain the MSW degree. The advanced standing program focuses on the advanced generalist courses and field placements. Courses at the 6000 level are required for the advanced stranding program.

Program of study for the master of social work

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year

1

SOCW5110 Social Work Practice I 3

SOCW5210 Micro Perspectives of HBSE 3

SOC5330 Policy Issues & Analysis in SW 3

SOC5010 SW Research Methods & Analysis 3

SOC5900 Foundation SW Field Lab 3

 Total 15 hours

SOCW5120 Social Work Practice II 3

SOCW5130 Social Work Practice III 3

SOCW5220 Macro SW Perspectives HBSE 3

SOCW6140 Advanced SW Assessment 3

SOCW5910 Foundation SW Field Placement 3

 Total 15 hours

Year

2

 

 

 

 

SOCW6110 Advanced Generalist Practice I 3

Research Elective* 3

Field of Practice – Practice** 3

Social Work Journal Review Seminar I 1

SOCW6900 Advanced SW Field Placement I 5

 Total 15 hours

 

SOCW6120 Advanced Generalist Practice II 3

SOCW6130 Advanced Generalist Practice III 3

Field of Practice – Policy*** 3

Social Work Journal Review Seminar II 1

SOCW6910 Advanced SW Field Placement II 5

 Total 15 hours

*      Students may choose between Research Methods for Micro Social Work Practice and Research Methods for Macro Social Work Practice.

**    Students may choose among Social Work Practice in Mental Health, Social Work Practice in the Aging Community, and Child and Family Social Work Practice.

***  Students may choose among Social Work Policy Issues in Mental Health, Social Work Policy Issues in Aging, and Social Work Policy Issues: Child and Family.

Certificate in Juvenile Justice

An optional certificate program in juvenile justice is offered as part of the master of arts in criminal justice degree program. This certificate is designed to provide a student with a more in-depth study of juvenile justice issues. The certificate requires the successful completion of the requirements for the master of arts in criminal justice degree and a minimum of 12 credit hours in juvenile justice courses which may be counted as criminal justice electives or general electives.

Admission

  • Must be admitted to the master of arts in criminal justice degree program
  • Meet with the director of the graduate program in criminal justice
  • Apply for admission to the certificate program

Program of Study

The juvenile justice certificate is only available as part of a master's degree program in criminal justice. Upon completion of the certificate requirements and the requirements for the master of arts in criminal justice, the certificate will be awarded.

Juvenile Justice Certificate (12 hours)

CRIM          6310            Juvenile Justice in the Metropolitan Community

Select 9 credit hours from the below list:

CRIM          5370            Disproportionate Confinement of Minority Youth

CRIM          5400            Criminal Justice Field Studies (Must be a placement in the community with an agency/program that deals with juvenile                                                      delinquents, troubled youths, or youths at risk)

CRIM          6940            Criminal Justice Internship  (Must be a placement in the community with an agency/program that deals with juvenile delinquents, troubled youths, or youths at risk)

CRIM          6980            Special Topics in Criminal Justice (Must be approved by the graduate coordinator and be a course which                                        focuses on an aspect of the juvenile justice system.

CRIM          6990            Independent Study in Criminal Justice (Must be on an area dealing with juvenile delinquents, troubled youths, or youths at risk)

 

Department of
EARLY CHILDHOOD, PHYSICAL AND SPECIAL EDUCATION
RICHARD WELSCH, chair

Programs housed in this department include graduate programs in early childhood education, physical education, and special education (intervention specialist licenses in early childhood, mild/moderate, moderate/intensive; MR/DD early intervention certificate). In addition, teacher licensure requirements may be obtained in early childhood education or special education in conjunction with the master’s degree. These programs are available at the master, education specialist (6th year program) and doctoral level (Ed.D. or Ph.D.). Endorsements are also available in the areas of (adapted physical education, early intervention, pre-school special needs, and transition to work).

Admission to Master’s Degree Programs

In addition to the College of Graduate Studies admission requirements, master’s programs housed in the department of Curriculum and Instruction (CI) require the following:

       An overall grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.7 on a 4.0 scale in all undergraduate work. Students who fail to meet this requirement may be considered for provisional admission, provided they demonstrate excellent promise for graduate study through other objective measures.

       Three recommendations regarding the prospective graduate student's potential for doing master's level work, which, depending upon the student’s status at the time, may come from such sources as the undergraduate major adviser, current employer, school principal or others who are knowledgeable about the applicant’s ability to engage in graduate work in the desired program.

       A statement describing the student's background and goals as well as the importance of the degree in achieving those goals.

       Some programs have selective admissions and may admit a limited number of students. Thus, meeting all formal criteria does not guarantee admission.

Requirements for Master’s Degree Programs

        Master’s programs housed in the department of Curriculum and Instruction (CI) require a minimum of 30 or 36 semester hours (depending on program) of approved graduate course work. No more than a total of six semester hours of credit from workshops (5950), problems or special topics courses (5980 or 6980), and independent studies (5990 or 6990) may be included in the degree program.

      All students completing one of the master’s degrees in this department must fulfill core requirements by completing one course from each of the following four foundations core areas within the first 21 semester hours of course work.

       The completion of a thesis, project, seminar, or field experience (practicum) is noted in specific program descriptions.

Programs leading to licensure or endorsement may require additional semester hours to fulfill licensure credential as well as degree requirements.

Licensure Alternative Master’s Program (LAMP)

The Licensure Alternative Masters Program (LAMP) is a unique program for providing an initial license for those individuals who are seeking a career change and are interested in becoming a teacher. The LAMP provides a sequence of courses which lead to teacher licensure from the State of Ohio and a master’s degree in education. Licensure may be obtained in early childhood education (grades PreK-3), physical education or special education (K-12). The program is designed to provide the student with many opportunities to participate in school settings and to put these experiences into perspective through on-campus reflective seminars.

Admission requirements for LAMP

All applicants must have a minimum 2.7 overall GPA (combined undergraduate GPA). Other admission requirements may include (but are not limited to) application, writing samples, interviews, and recommendation letters. Students must be fully admitted to the College of Graduate Studies to be eligible. Students must consult with the appropriate LAMP adviser prior to applying.

Master of Education in Early Childhood Education PreK-3
A.    Foundations core .......................................................................... 12

•     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

             Curriculum core: CIEC 5340 or 6310

B.     Specialization................................................................................ 18

        Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.     Theory and research requirement ................................................... 3

        CIEC 6950

D.    Seminar, project or thesis................................................................ 3

        CIEC 6900, 6920 or 6960

Requirements for initial teacher licensure may be met as part of the M.Ed. degree. See the description of the Licensure Alternative Master’s Program (LAMP) section. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

Master of Education in Physical Education

A.   Foundations core .......................................................................... 12

•     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

  • Curriculum core: PED 5250 or PED 5170 (selected in consultation with faculty adviser).        

B.   Specialization................................................................................. 21

      Areas of focus may include adapted physical education or teacher development.

      Specialization in Adapted Physical Education leads to endorsement by the

      State of Ohio. Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Seminar, project or thesis................................................................. 3

CIEC 6900 or PED 6920 or 6960

Requirements for initial teacher licensure may be met as part of the M.Ed. degree. See the description of the Licensure Alternative Master’s Program (LAMP) section. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

Master of Education in Special Education

A.   Foundations core........................................................................... 12

•     RESM 5110, 5210 or 5310.

•     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210 or 5310

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

  • Curriculum core: Students with an undergraduate degree
  • outside of special education take SPED 5000, 5160, 5180,

5250, or 6070. Students with an undergraduate degree in

special education take SPED 5820, 5860, 6470, 6490, 6590,

6800, 6810, 6830, CIEC 5340, CIEC 6310, or CIEC 6340.

B.   Specialization ................................................................................ 18

Areas of focus may include, but are not limited to, general special education, early childhood special education, transition to work, or behavior disorders, or gifted and talented.

Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Culminating experience ................................................................... 6

SPED 6930 and one of the following: SPED 6930 (exam) or SPED 6920, or SPED 6960

Requirements for initial teacher licensure may be met as part of the M.Ed. degree. See the description of the Licensure Alternative Master’s Program (LAMP) section. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

Doctoral Degree Programs

The department offers a doctoral degree in curriculum and instruction with a focus on special education or early childhood education.

Admission to Doctoral Programs

Individuals applying for admission to doctoral study must meet the admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies as well as specific program requirements.

       A minimum 3.25 cumulative GPA, using a 4.0 scale, on all previous graduate academic work with a completed master's degree.

       Acceptable GRE scores 50 percentile or higher.

       Evidence in prerequisite academic work that the applicant can successfully complete the doctoral program in the area of study.

       An autobiographical sketch that describes why the applicant wishes to pursue the selected doctoral program.This sketch also should include information on previous study, educational experience, professional accomplishments, immediate and future professional goals, a proposed time schedule for completing the degree, and any other information that the applicant believes is relevant for admission into the desired program.

       Evidence of research and writing ability. Such evidence may include a master’s thesis, proctored writing sample, a written research report, one or more reprints of publications, a paper presented to a professional society, or similar evidence of competence in this respect.

       Evidence of successful teaching experience is preferred.

Requirements for Doctoral Programs

A minimum of 60 hours beyond the master's degree is required. Each doctoral student is expected to:

       Identify a concentration in an area of specialization (i.e., a major) and pass a written examination (major examination);

       Demonstrate proficiency in tools of research;

       After passing the written major examination, pass an oral examination that covers the relevant coursework;

       Present a dissertation proposal;

       Present and defend a completed dissertation in a public forum.

Academic Advising Committee

The student is assigned a temporary adviser upon admission to a program. This adviser guides the student in forming a doctoral program committee.

The doctoral program committee is be formed before the student completes 18 hours of credit. The doctoral program committee has a minimum of three members who are selected from the membership of the graduate faculty of the University. The doctoral program committee is responsible for assisting the student in the development of a plan of study and assuring competence by overseeing the doctoral major exam and doctoral program orals.

The plan of study must be approved by the doctoral program committee, the department chairperson, and the Associate Dean for Graduate Affairs of the college. The plan of study must be filed before 18 semester hours of the doctoral program are completed. After completion of the academic requirements, the student must form a dissertation committee to guide the development of the dissertation.

Dissertation

The dissertation committee must include a minimum of four graduate faculty members including one who is not in the discipline major. The student must work closely with the committee to develop a research proposal for the dissertation. Once the committee approves the research design, the student must obtain Institutional Research Board approval before beginning the research study. A public defense of the dissertation is required.

Licensure Programs

Licensure Programs housed in the Department of Early Childhood, Physical, and Special Education:

Early Childhood Education (PreK-3)
Early Childhood Intervention Specialist
Intervention Specialist: Mild/Moderate
Intervention Specialist: Moderate/Intensive 

Endorsements

             Adapted Physical Education
             Early Childhood Generalist (4-5)
             Early Intervention
             Pre-School Special Needs
             Transition to Work

EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS AND LEADERSHIP
WILLIAM GRAY, interim chair

Introduction

The mission of the department of educational foundations and leadership is to prepare and develop educational leaders and scholars to be agents of transformation on all levels of educational systems. A learning paradigm informs our graduate programs, which are student-centered, inquiry-based, and integrated in terms of theory and practice. The department offers graduate programs (Master’s, Ed.S, Ed.D., and Ph.D.) in Educational Administration and Supervision, Educational Psychology, Higher Education, Research and Measurement, Social Foundations of Education (including philosophy, sociology, and history of education), and graduate study in Foundations of Education.

The department is also the home of the John H. Russel Center for Educational Leadership and the Center for Nonviolence and Democratic Education (CNDE).

Admission to Master’s Degree Programs

In addition to the College of Graduate Studies admission requirements, master’s programs housed in the department of educational foundations and leadership require the following:

       An overall grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.7 on a 4.0 scale in all undergraduate work. Students who fail to meet this requirement may be considered for provisional admission, provided they demonstrate excellent promise for graduate study. The GRE is required for students with less than a 2.7 undergraduate grade point average.

       Three letters of recommendation regarding the prospective graduate student's potential for doing master's level work, which, depending upon the student’s status at the time, may come from such sources as the undergraduate major adviser, current employer, school principal or others who are knowledgeable about the applicant’s ability to engage in graduate work in the desired program.

       A statement describing the students' background and goals as well as the importance of the degree in achieving those goals.

       Some programs have selective admissions and may admit a limited number of students. Thus, meeting all formal criteria does not guarantee admission.

Requirements for Master’s Degree Programs

        Master’s programs housed in the department of Educational Foundations and Leadership require a minimum of 30 or 36 semester hours (depending on program) of approved graduate course work. No more than a total of six semester hours of credit from workshops (5950), problems or special topics courses (5980 or 6980), and independent studies (5990 or 6990) may be included in the degree program.

Master of Education in Educational Administration and Supervision

A.    Foundations core ......................................................................... 12

•     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

  • Curriculum: CI 5860, 5870, 6800, 6810, 6830, 6840, SPED 5000, CIEC 5340 or CIEC 6310

B.     Specialization............................................................................... 21

        Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.     Seminar, project or thesis.............................................................. 3

        EDAS 6900 or 6920 or 6960

Programs leading to the M.Ed. degree in educational administration and supervision also may meet some of the requirements for the principal and/or administrative specialist license in Ohio. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

Master of Education in Educational Psychology

A.   Foundations core .......................................................................... 12

•     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

           .............. Curriculum: CI 5860, 5870, 6800, 6810, 6830 or 6840

B.   Specialization................................................................................. 21

      Areas of focus may include learning/cognition or human development.

      Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Project or thesis............................................................................... 3

      EDP 6980 or 6960

Master of Education in Educational Research and Measurement

A.   Foundations core .......................................................................... 12

•     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

    Curriculum: CI 5860, 5870, 5800, 6810, 6830 or 6840

B.   Specialization................................................................................. 21

Areas of focus may include statistics, measurement or evaluation.

Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Project or thesis.............................................................................. 3

      RESM 6980 or 6960

 

Master of Education in Educational Theory and Social Foundations

A.   Foundations core ........................................................................... 12

•     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

           .............. Curriculum: CI 5860, 5870, 5800, 6810, 6830 or 6840

B.   Specialization.................................................................................. 21

      Areas of focus may include historical foundations, philosophical foundations, sociological foundations, multicultural or urban education.

      Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

C.   Project or thesis.............................................................................. 3

      TSOC 6980 or 6960

Master of Education in Higher Education

A.   Foundations core............................................................................ 12

•     Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 5310, 5320, or 5330

•     Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

•     Social Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

            Curriculum: HED 6410, CI 5860, 5870, 6810, 6820, 6830, 6840, SPED 5000 or HEAL 6280

B.   Introduction to Master's Study in Higher Education......................... 1

      HED 5920

C.   Specialization .................................................................................. 18
Must take HED 6510 and 6640, plus 12 hours of electives.

       Areas of focus may include college student personnel, community college administration or general administration.

      Courses must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser.

D.   Practicum.......................................................................................... 2
HED 6940

E.   Project, thesis or seminar................................................................. 3
HED 6920, 6960, or 6980

 

Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) Degree Programs

Educational specialist (Ed.S.) degree is a post-master’s graduate program in administration and supervision that provides students an area of organizational leadership or educational specialization with emphasis on practice. This 32 hours degree is designed to meet the needs of individuals whose career goals include licensure for advanced administrative positions in public and private schools (e.g., district administrator, building administrator).

 


Admission to Educational Specialist Degree Program

Admission requirements to the Ed.S. programs include a bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year institution and a master’s degree from an accredited institution.

       The letters of recommendation are expected from academic professionals to support the applicant's ability and character to succeed in the graduate degree.

  • A statement of purpose is required to demonstrate writing ability and to describe the applicant’s goals and how the educational specialist degree supports those goals.

Requirements for Educational Specialist

       Completion of a minimum of 32 semester hours of approved graduate coursework beyond the master’s level with a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. All course work for the Ed.S. must be taken within a six-year periodimmediatelypreceding the date the degree is awarded.

       Students are required to develop a plan of study with their adviser that specifies the coursework that must be completed to fulfill degree requirements including EDAS 8640 and EDAS 7920. This plan must be filed prior to the completion of 15 semester hours and must be approved by the adviser, the department chairperson, and the college associate dean for graduate affairs.

       No more than a total of six semester hours of credit from workshops (7950), problems or special topics courses (7980) and independent studies (7990 or 8990) may be applied to a specialist’s program.

       The program requires the completion of a culminating experience, which may include field experiences, internships, projects, etc.

 

Doctoral Degree Programs

The department offers several doctoral degrees: the doctor of education degree in Education Administration and Supervision, the doctor of philosophy degree in Higher Education, and in the Foundations of Education majors of Educational Psychology, Educational Research and Measurement, Educational Sociology, Foundations of Education, History of Education, and Philosophy of Education. Most doctoral programs are available as minor areas of study for other doctoral programs that require a minor. Additional areas of study for the minor are available within the college, as well as areas from other colleges at The University of Toledo. Students should discuss these alternatives with their advisers.

Admission to Doctoral Programs

Individuals applying for admission to doctoral study in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service must meet the admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies, the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service, and the specific degree program the individual chooses. The following is a composite of the College of Graduate Studies and the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service admission requirements.

       A minimum 3.25 cumulative GPA, using a 4.0 scale, on all previous graduate academic work and completed master's degree from an accredited institution.

       Acceptable GRE scores, as determined by individual programs.

       Evidence in prerequisite academic work that the applicant can successfully complete the doctoral program in the area of study.

       An autobiographical sketch that describes why the applicant wishes to pursue the selected doctoral program. This sketch also should include information on previous study, educational experience, professional accomplishments, immediate and future professional goals, a proposed time schedule for completing the degree, and any other information that the applicant believes is relevant for admission into the desired program.

       Evidence of research and writing ability, if required by the doctoral program. Such evidence may include a master’s thesis, proctored writing sample, a written research report, one or more reprints of publications, a paper presented to a professional society, or similar evidence of competence in this respect.

       A personal interview, if required by the doctoral program.

 

Requirements for Doctoral Programs

A minimum of 60 hours beyond the master's degree is required. Each doctoral student is expected to:

       Concentration in one area of specialization (i.e., a major) and pass a written examination (major examination) in the major area of concentration;

       Proficiency in tools of research;

       Depending on program, pass a separate written examination for each minor area of concentration;

       After passing the written major examination and any written minor examination, pass an oral examination that covers the relevant coursework;

       Orally present and defend a dissertation proposal;

       Orally present and defend a completed dissertation in a public forum.

Academic Advising Committee

The student is assigned a temporary adviser upon admission to a program. This adviser guides the student in forming a doctoral program committee.

The doctoral program committee shall be formed before the student completes 18 hours of credit. The doctoral program committee has a minimum of three members who are selected from the membership of the graduate faculty of the University. The doctoral program committee is responsible for assisting the student in the development of a plan of study and assuring competence by overseeing the doctoral major exam, any minor exam(s) and doctoral program orals.

The plan of study must be approved by the doctoral program committee, the department chairperson, and the Associate Dean for Graduate Affairs of the college. The plan of study must be filed before 18 semester hours of the doctoral program are completed. After completion of the academic requirements, the student must form a dissertation committee to guide the development of the dissertation.

Dissertation

The dissertation committee must include a minimum of four graduate faculty members including one who is not in the discipline major. The student must work closely with the committee to develop a research proposal for the dissertation. Once the committee approves the research design, the student must obtain Institutional Research Board approval before beginning the research study. A public defense of the dissertation is required.

 


Licensure Programs

Licensure Programs housed in the Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership:

Administrative Specialist
Career and Technical Administration
Personnel Administration
School Community Relationships
School Principal (PreK-6)
School Principal (4-9)
School Principal (5-12)
School Superintendent

 

HEALTH AND RECREATION PROFESSIONS
JOSEPH DAKE, chair 

Introduction

The department of health and recreation professions offers a variety of degree options and graduate courses. In health, a master of education in school health education and a master of public health track in health promotion and education are available as well as the doctor of philosophy degree in health education. For students admitted to the occupational therapy doctorate, a dual doctoral degree program leading to the doctor of philosophy in health education is also available. Please see information about this dual program located in the department of rehabilitation sciences.

In recreation professions, the master of arts in recreation and leisure studies with specializations in recreation administration, in recreational therapy or in recreational therapy and therapeutic arts are available. 

Health Education Program

The program in health provides coursework leading to a master of education in health education, a master of education in school health education with school nurse licensure, a master of public health track in health promotion and education, and a doctor of philosophy in health education.

Master of Education in Health Education

The master of education in health education is designed for several different possible students. First, the degree can be used to advance the education of licensed health education teachers by providing additional insight into educational cultural foundations, research foundations, curriculum, educational psychology foundations, and health content and pedagogy. Second, the program can be used for teachers who are certified in another academic area and wish to gain knowledge, experience, and licensure in health education (should licensure be desired, additional courses and advising is required). Finally, students can enroll in the master of education program if they are interested in working in a tangential area and want to learn more about how school health education can impact the health and academic outcomes for children and adolescents.

Admission

Requirements for regular admission include:

  • an undergraduate degree in a health related area (or special permission by the program);
  • an application;
  • three letters of recommendation;
  • a personal statement;
  • official transcripts with a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.70 on a 4 point scale.

Program of Study

The master of education in health education requires a minimum of 30 credit hours. The degree includes four foundations courses, a minimum of 18 credits in health education courses including two required health educational courses, and a culminating experience.

Program of study for the master of education in health education

Foundation Requirements (12 semester hours)

Students must complete one course from each of the following foundations areas within the first 21 semester hours of course work:

a.   Psychological Foundations: EDP 5110, 5120, 5210, 5220, 5230, 55310, 5320, 5330, or 6340

b.   Research Foundations: RESM 5110, 5210, 5310, or 5330

c.   Social (Cultural) Foundations: TSOC 5100, 5110, 5200, 5210, 5230, 5300, or 5400

d.   Curriculum Foundations:CI 5870, CI 6300, CI 6810, CI 6820, CI 6830, CI 6840, HEAL 6850, or SPED 5000

 

Required Health Courses (6 hours)

HEAL     6500        Issues in School Health

HEAL     6600        Health Behavior

Specialty Courses (15 hours)   

 

Required Project/Thesis (3 hours)

HEAL     6920        Master’s Research Project in Health Education OR

HEAL     6960        Master’s Research Thesis in Health Education (3 hours)

Requirements for initial teacher licensure may be met as part of the master's degree with additional coursework. Students should consult their adviser for detailed information.

 

Master of Education in School Health Education with School Nurse Licensure

The master of education in school health education with school nurse licensure prepares a nurse for the specialized practice of school nursing in order to be a successful member of a school health team. School nurses are responsible for the health and well-being of students and school faculty and staff. This is accomplished through direct provision of health services as well as through supporting a safe and healthy learning environment. After completion of this program, graduates will be eligible for an Ohio school nurse license.

Admission

Regular admission requires:

  • a bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) or an equivalent four-year nursing degree;
  • an application;
  • three letters of recommendation;
  • a personal statement; and
  • official transcripts with a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.70 on a 4 point scale

Program of Study

The master of education in health education with school nurse licensure requires a minimum of 36 credit hours. The degree includes five foundations courses, a minimum of 18 credits in health education courses, and a culminating experience.

Program of study for the master of education in school health education with school nurse licensure

Required Foundation Courses:

Cultural Foundations (3 hours): TSOC 5200 or TSOC 5230

Research Foundations (3 hours): RESM 5110

Curriculum (6 hours): HEAL 6850 and SPED 5000

Psychology Foundations (3 hours): EDP 5210 or EDP 5220

 

Required Health Courses (18 hours)

HEAL     5400        Professional Issues in School Nursing
HEAL     5950        School Nurse Workshop
HEAL     5940        School Health Internship  
HEAL     6500        Issues in School Health
HEAL     6530        Drug Use and Misuse  

Required Project/Thesis (3 hours)

HEAL     6920        Master’s Research Project in Health Education OR
HEAL     6960        Master’s Research Thesis in Health Education (3 hours)

Master of Public Health: Health Promotion and Education Program

The master of public health (MPH) degree is offered via the Northwest Ohio Consortium for Public Health (NOCPH), a collaboration of Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and the University of Toledo (UT). The MPH program is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).

The curriculum for the health promotion and education(HPE) major specialization focuses on methods for planning, implementing and evaluating educational and behavioral changes as well as programs that enhance health. Students are prepared for positions that emphasize program planning, health promotion, health education, disease prevention and social action. Graduates work in business and in voluntary, non-profit and governmental agencies at local, county, state and federal levels.

Admission

Applications for the MPH program are processed on the Health Science Campus of the University of Toledo. 

Applicant may qualify for "Regular Admission" if he/she satisfies all of these requirements: 

      •   Completed bachelor degree, including foundation courses. It is expected that all applicants will have successfully completed college-level mathematics and biology and course work in the social sciences.

     •   GPA of at least 3.0 (or equivalent)

     •   TOEFL 550 (not applicable if English is applicant's primary language)

     •   Recommended by three references 

Applicant may qualify for "Conditional Admission" if he/she has one or more of the following deficiencies:

      •   Must complete necessary foundation course(s)

     •   GPA higher than 2.7 but lower than 3.0 (or equivalent)

 

Program of Study

The master of public health degree requires a minimum of 45 semester credits that includes 18 credits of core courses (in the area of public health), specific courses in the health promotion and education specialization, and options for the capstone experiences.

Program of study for the master of public health, health promotion and education

Core Courses (18 semester credits)

PUBH 6000 Public Health Statistics (3) (UT – Fall)
PUBH 6010 Public Health Epidemiology (3) (UT – Spring)
Prerequisite: PUBH 600
PUBH 6040 Public Health Administration (3) (BGSU – Fall)
PUBH 6050 Concepts and Issues in Environmental Health (3) (BGSU – Summer)
PUBH 6600 Health Behavior (3) (UT – Spring)
Prerequisite: PUBH 600
PUBH 6640 Issues in Public Health (3) (UT – Fall, occasionally Spring)

Required Major Courses (12-15 semester credits depending on Major) (all courses offered at UT):

PUBH 6200 Methods and Materials in Public Health (Fall, Spring)
PUBH 6300 Community Health Organization (Fall, Spring)
PUBH 6460 Health Promotion Programs (Fall, Spring)
PUBH 6360 Evaluation of Health Programs (Fall, Spring)

Core Capstone Courses (6 semester credits)

PUBH 6850 Integrative Seminar in Public Health (3) (BGSU – Fall, Spring)
PUBH 6960 Internship in Public Health OR
PUBH 6970 Project in Public Health

Doctor of Philosophy in Health Education

The doctoral degree program in health focuses on advanced study and research in community/health education. The program prepares advanced students to contribute to the field of health through research. Although research and health courses are required, the program is individualized through selection of a cognate and elective courses to develop each student for leadership roles in universities, public service or the private health sector.

Admission

Admission to the program includes completion of a master’s degree from an accredited institution. In addition to the College of Graduate Studies requirements, evaluation of applicants is based on the following criteria:

  • completion of the GRE;
  • a clearly defined statement of purpose that specifies the area of specialization within the degree program;
  • a minimum of three letters of reference from faculty members with specific expertise in health who have worked with the applicant in an academic setting;
  • evidence of research and/or writing ability through a master’s thesis, project, paper, report, publication or paper presented to a professional society will be considered;
  • international applicants must submit a TOEFL score of 550 or higher

Prospective students should contact the department for further information.

Program of Study

The program requires 12 credits of research core courses, 25 hours of specified health education courses, 12 hours from a related field to fulfill the cognate, approved electives based on the student's needs and interests, and a dissertation that contributes to the field of health education.

Program of study for the doctor of philosophy in health education

General Core Requirements (12 credit hours)

HEAL     8880        Scientific Writing in Health
RESM     8120        Quantitative Methods II
RESM     8320        Research Design
RESM 7330, 8130, 8160, 8350 or PUBH 801  (select one)

Required Courses (25 hours)

HEAL     8000        Professional Issues in Health Education
HEAL     8200        Methods and Materials in Public Health
HEAL     8300       Community Health Organization
HEAL     8360        Applied Survey Research in Health
HEAL     8460        Health Promotion Programs
HEAL     8600       Health Behavior
HEAL    8640        Issues in Public Health
HEAL    8800        Evaluation of Health Programs
HEAL     8900        Grant Writing

Elective Courses (11 hours)

        Student must consult with adviser and program committee to select elective courses.

Cognate Area (12 hours)

        Student must consult with adviser and program committee to specify courses for cognate area.

Doctoral Dissertation (10 hours)

An opportunity exists for graduate students interested in pursuing a joint OTD/PhD degree in Occupational Therapy and Health Education. This joint degree program provides occupational therapy students with the clinical practice, advocacy, leadership, research, and scholarship skills needed to pursue careers in higher education. The occupational therapy program provides detailed description of the application process and curriculum. Opportunities also exist for students to take related graduate level courses across campus that lead to certification (e.g., biostatistics and epidemiology, gerontological practice, occupational health, public health and emergency response).

Recreation Professions Program

Master of Arts in Recreation and Leisure: Recreation Administration, Recreational Therapy, or Recreational Therapy and Therapeutic Arts

The recreation and leisure studies (RLS) program offers advanced study beyond the baccalaureate level in recreation and leisure studies with emphasis in one or more of the following areas: Recreation Administration or Recreational Therapy.   The graduate degree offers students the ability to focus on areas of interest while obtaining skills beyond the entry level.  Advanced coursework challenges the student to investigate personal philosophies as they relate to the delivery of leisure services.

Admission

Students enrolling in the master of arts in recreation and leisure must meet the following minimum admission requirements:

  • A bachelor’s or professional degree earned from a department of approved standing and granted by an accredited college or university.
  • A 2.70 or equivalent Grade Point Average (GPA) for all previous undergraduate academic work.
  • Prerequisite academic work that indicates the applicant should be able to pursue effectively the master of arts in recreation and leisure studies.
  • Proof of health and accident insurance.
  • Satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) if from a country where English is not the primary language.         

Program of Study

The program leading to the master’s degree allows students to choose service learning projects, internships, or research activities that will prepare them for successful careers in the field.  The program includes a research core, recreation core, and specific courses and electives in the student's area of concentration. A minimum of 36 credits is required for the degree. For further information, please contact r.kucharewski@utoledo.edu.

Program of study for master of arts in recreation and leisure

Recreation and Recreation Therapy Core (9 Hours)

RCRT      5210        Leisure Theory and Popular Culture
RCRT      6000        Issues and Trends in Recreation and Recreational Therapy
RCRT      6020        Financial Resources of Recreation and Recreational Therapy

Specialization Area (9-12 hours)

Select courses from the recreational therapy support area with pre-approval of courses by graduate academic adviser.

Electives (3-6 hours)

Approved by adviser to accommodate a total of 36 hours.

NOTE:    Prerequisite coursework may be required, specifically for the recreation therapy or recreation therapy and therapeutic arts degrees.

Research Core (Select A, B, or C from the following Culminating Research Options) (9-12 hours)

Research Culminating Experience: Option A (9 credit hours)
RCRT      5940        Internship
RCRT      5420        Leisure Program Research Techniques

 

Research Culminating Experience: Option B (9 credit hours)

RCRT      6920        Master’s Project in Recreation & Leisure
RCRT      5420        Leisure Program Research Techniques      

Select one (1) Research/Statistics course from the following:

HSHS     6000        Statistics and Research for Health Science and Human Service Professionals
RESM     5110        Quantitative Methods I                                
SOC        5290        Social Research Statistics
HEAL     6750        Applied Biostatistics 

Research Culminating Experience: Option C (12 credit hours)

RCRT      6920        Master’s Thesis
RCRT      5420        Leisure Program Research Techniques

        Select one (1) Research/Statistics course from the following:

        HSHS     6000        Statistics and Research for Health Science and Human Service Professionals
        RESM     5110        Quantitative Methods I
        SOC                5290 .................................................. Social Research Statistics
        PUBH     6750        Applied Biostatistics (3 credit hours)

 

Program Sequence for Master of Arts with emphasis in Recreational Therapy

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Year

1

RCRT5420 Leisure Prog. Research Techniques 3

RCRT5310 Leisure Theory & Popular Culture 3

RCRT5300 Rec. & Adapt for Special Populations 3

RCRT5610 Adventure Therapy Programming 3

Prerequisite Course or NCTRC Elective (if needed) 3

 Total 12-15 hours

RCRT5720 Intro to Therapeutic Recreation 3

RCRT5320 Administration in Recreation & RT 3

RCRT6000 Issues & Trends in Recreation & RT 3

RCRT Interventions (6 courses) 6

 

 Total 15 hours

RCRT6020 Financial Resources in Recreation & RT 3

Prerequisite Courses or NCTRC Elective (if needed) 3-6

 

 

 

Total 6-9 hours

Year

2

RCRT5730 Medical & Clinical Aspects of TR 3

RCRT4740 Assessment & Documentation 3

RCRT Interventions (4) 4

RCRT Clinicals (2 Courses) 2

Prerequisite Course or NCTRC Elective (if needed) 3

 Total 12-15 hours

RCRT5750 Group Dynamics in RT 3

RCRT5870 Program Planning in RT 3

RCRT Clinicals (2 Courses) 2

Prerequisite Course or NCTRC Elective (if needed) 3-6

 

Total 11-14 hours

RCRT5940 Internship 6

 

 

 

 

Total 6 hours

 

Program Sequence for Master of Arts with emphasis in Recreation Administration

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Year

1

RCRT5420 Leisure Program Research Techniques 3

RCRT5310 Leisure Theory & Popular Culture 3

Concentration Electives (Advisor Approval) 6-9

(SEE BELOW)

 

Total 12-15 hours

RCRT6000 Issues & Trends in Recreation & RT 3

Concentration Electives (Advisor Approval) 9-12

(SEE BELOW)

Total 12-15 hours

RCRT6020 Financial Resources in Recreation & RT 3

Concentration Electives (Advisor Approval) 3-9

(SEE BELOW)

Total 6-12 hours

 

RCRT5300 Recreation & Adaptation for Special Pop 3

RCRT5340 Leisure Recreation & Aging 3

RCRT5400 Naturalist & Interp. Services 3

RCRT5410 Park & Recreation Planning 3

RCRT5610 Adventure Therapy Programming 3

RCRT6920 Master’s Thesis 6

RCRT6940 Internship 1-3

Research Course Elective 3

RCRT5320 Administration in Recreation & RT 3

RCRT5500 Wildlife Management 3

RCRT5610 Adventure Therapy Programming 3

RCRT6920 Master’s Project in Recreation 7 Leisure 3

RCRT6940 Internship 1-3

RCRT5940 Internship 6

RCRT5510 Wilderness Policy & Leadership 3

 

KINESIOLOGY
BARRY SCHEUERMANN, chair

Introduction

The department of kinesiology offers graduate programs leading to the master of science in exercise science (M.S.E.S.) and the doctor of philosophy in exercise science (Ph.D.) degrees. These programs involve a combination of courses, seminars, clinical experiences and research that is intended to prepare individuals for a wide range of careers that relate to exercise science. Involvement in research is emphasized throughout the program.

A dual doctoral degree program leading to the doctor of philosophy in exercise science is available for students admitted to the occupational therapy doctorate or the doctorate of physical therapy. Please see those programs located in the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences for information.

Master of Science in Exercise Science

The department of kinesiology offers programming at the graduate level leading to the master of science in exercise science (MSES) degree. Students may choose to specialize in athletic training, biomechanics, exercise physiology. These specializations involve a combination of courses, seminars, clinical experiences, and research that is intended to prepare individuals for a wide range of careers and advanced study in exercise science and related fields.

Admission

  • previous academic training – admitted students will typically have an undergraduate degree in exercise science or a closely related area
  • academic record – applicants with an undergraduate GPA above 2.75 will be considered for admission; 3.0 in the last 60 hours of the undergraduate program is recommended
  • scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE)
  • letters of recommendation – three letters are required from individuals qualified to assess the individual’s potential for success in graduate education, faculty members with specific expertise in kinesiology or closely related area are recommended
  • area of study – all applicants must identify their intended area of study within the MSES program.

Admission is competitive. A selected number of students are admitted to each specialization program area depending on space.

Program of Study

The MSES program typically requires 36 credits to complete. A student’s curriculum will include a combination of courses, seminars, independent study, and research. While many students choose to complete a thesis as part of this curriculum, a non-thesis option is available. Full-time students typically are able to complete the programs in two years.

All prospective applicants are encouraged to contact a faculty member in their area of specialization to discuss their interests and plans.

Program Sequence for Master in Athletic Training Specialization

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year

1

KINE6100 Physiology of Exercise 3

KINE6130 Biomechanics of Human Motion 3

KINE6660 Evidence Based Practice [RS6] 3

KINE6930 Clinical Experience in AT 3

Total 12 hours

KINE5100 measure & Statistics 3

KINE6200 Biomechanics Instrumentation 3

KINE6230 Scientific Writing & Research Method 3

KINE6680 Interventions in AT 3

Total 12 hours

Year

2

KINE6600 Current Issues in AT 3

KINE6930 Seminar – Anatomy for Clinic

KINE6960 Master’s Thesis 3

Total 9 hours

KINE6670 Pathomech [RS7] of Injury 3

KINE6960 Masters Thesis 3

KINE6990 Seminar – Tape and Brace 3

Total 9 hours

*Note - The above courses and sequence are typical of what most students will follow but may change from year to year.

Program Sequence for Master in Biomechanics Concentration

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year

1

KINE6100 Physiology of Exercise              3

KINE6130 Biomechanics of Human Motion 3

KINE6930 Seminar – Anatomy for Clinic    3 

 

Total 9 hours

KINE5100 Measure & Statistics                        3

KINE6200 Biomechanics Instrumentation          3

KINE6230 Scientific Writing & Research Method 3

KINE6690 Master’s Thesis                               3

Total 12 hours

Year

2

MIME5230 Dynamics of Human Motion     3

RESM6120 Quantitative Statistics II         3

KINE6300 Human Locomotion                 3

KINE6960 Master’s Thesis                       3

Total 12 hours

KINE6670 Pathomech [RS8] of Injury              3

KINE6960 Master’s Thesis                              3

 

 

Total 6 hours

*Note - The above courses and sequence are typical of what most students will follow but may change from year to year.

Program Sequence for Master in Exercise Physiology Concentration

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year

1

KINE6100 Physiology of Exercise    3

RESM6120 Quantitative Statistics I 3

KINE6930 Seminar –
Exercise Metabolism                      3

 Total 9 hours

KINE6420 Cardiopulmonary Exercise Physiology 3

KINE6560 Skeletal Muscle Biology                    3

KINE6930 Seminar – Vascular Inflam               3

KINE6990 Independent Study                         3

Total 12 hours

Year

2

KINE6130 Biomechanics of Human
Motion 3

KINE6960 Master’s Thesis 3

KINE6990 Independent Study 3

Total 9 hours

KINE6440 Exercise Metab and Endocrinology   3

KINE6960 Master’s Thesis                             3

 

Total 6 hours

*Note - The above courses and sequence are typical of what most students will follow but may change from year to year.

Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Science

The department of kinesiology provides qualified students with the opportunity to pursue coursework and research leading to the doctor of philosophy in exercise science. Students work closely with a faculty mentor to design a program that is consistent with the mentor's research focus and that meets the unique needs of the student. This includes courses, seminars, independent study and research, and may reflect a secondary area of specialization (cognate) that some students choose to pursue.   Areas of research include: muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology, biomechanics of human movement, sports injury and rehabilitation.   Typically, graduates of this program go on to pursue careers in higher education teaching and research or post-doctoral research in areas relating to their doctoral specialization.

A unique feature of the program is the possibility for students in the university’s doctorate in physical therapy and the occupational therapy doctorate programs to combine either of these programs with work leading to the completion of the doctor of philosophy in exercise science degree. This option is ideal for students who wish to pursue a career in academics and research relating to physical or occupational therapy.  

 

Admission

Prospective students are considered for admission to the doctoral program on the basis of the following:

  • The individual’s previous academic training – admitted students will typically have a master’s degree in exercise science or a closely related area.
  • The individual’s academic record – the applicant’s undergraduate and graduate academic record should demonstrate the ability for high-level scholarship.
  • The applicant’s scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) – applicants should have a combined (quantitative and verbal) GRE score of at least 1040 or above the 50 percentile.
  • The applicant’s letters of recommendation – three letters are required from individuals qualified to assess the applicant’s potential for success in doctoral education.
  • The applicant’s intended area of study – applicants must identify their intended area of study within the Ph.D. program and be selected as an advisee by faculty member working in that area.

Students enrolled in the first year of study in the doctor of physical therapy or the occupational doctorate should apply for the doctor of philosophy in exercise science. In addition to the admission criteria above, a faculty member from the student’s clinical doctoral program should provide a letter of recommendation and be willing to serve as mentor to the student.

Program of Study

The doctor of philosophy in exercise science requires a minimum of 72 post-master’s credits for completion; all students complete a dissertation as part of the degree process. All prospective applicants should contact a faculty member in the department of kinesiology to discuss their interests and plans.

Students work closely with a faculty mentor to design a program that meets the unique needs of the individual. The program of study typically requires four years of full-time study. The dual degree program with the clinical doctoral degrees in occupational therapy and physical therapy provide a limited number of courses and competencies that meet the requirements of both degrees.

Program Sequence for Ph.D. in Exercise Science

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year

1

KINE8100 Physiology of Exercise                   3

KINE8130 Biomechanics of
Human Motion                                             3

KINE8990 Independent Study                      6

 

Total 12 hours

KINE7100 Measure & Statistics                        3

KINE8200 Biomechanics Instrumentation         3

KINE8230 Scientific Writing & Research Method 3

KINE8930 Independent Study                          3

Total 12 hours

Year

2

KINE8660 Evidence Based Practice               3

KINE8930 Seminar – Anatomy for Clinic       3

KINE8960 Doctoral Dissertation                  3

Total 9 hours

KINE8670 Pathomech [RS9] of Injury               3

RESM8120 Quantitative Statistics II                  3

KINE8960 Doctoral Dissertation                       3

Total 9 hours

Year

3

KINE8930 Seminar – Adv. Lab Tech             3

KINE8990 Seminar – Teach Exercise Science 3

KINE8960 Doctoral Dissertation                   3

Total 9 hours

RESM8980 Seminar – Statistics by Comp         3

KINE8960 Doctoral Dissertation                      6

 



Total 9 hours

Year

4

KINE8960 Doctoral Dissertation                  9

Total 9 hours

KINE8960 Doctoral Dissertation                       9

Total 9 hours

*Note - The above courses and sequence are typical of what most students will follow but may change from year to year.

REHABILITATION SCIENCES
MICHELLE MASTERSON, chair

Introduction

The department of rehabilitation sciences includes clinical doctoral programs in occupational therapy and physical therapy. The master of arts is available for students interested in speech-language pathology (therapy).

Speech-Language Pathology Program

The graduate program provides students with the necessary coursework and clinical practicum experience to attain a master of arts in speech-language pathology that is applicable toward the Certification of Clinical Competence (CCC-SLP) by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and state licensure in the area of speech-language pathology. In addition to successful completion of the master’s degree requirements, the certification and licensure processes include approved undergraduate preparation, successful completion of the national specialty examination in speech-language pathology, and a clinical fellowship (professional experience year).

The speech-language pathology graduate program is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology

Admission

Undergraduate students with a degree in speech-language pathology will be considered for entry into the graduate program. Students without adequate undergraduate preparation in speech-language pathology will need to complete a series of leveling courses in the major to be considered for entry into the graduate program as an undergraduate with degree.

The deadline for completed applications for consideration for acceptance into the graduate speech-language pathology program is January 15. Applications must provide GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and transcriptions. Applicants may be selected to participate in an interview. Applications received after January 15 may not receive full consideration.

Acceptance into the ASHA accredited speech-language pathology graduate program is highly competitive.  Consequently, many factors are taken into consideration when selecting applicants for acceptance into the program as an undergraduate with degree. Preference is given to applicants who exceed factors including, but not limited to:

  • undergraduate preparation in the field
  • cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher in the major 
  • potential to successfully complete the graduate program
  • quality of reference letters (require 3)
  • stated goals and purpose
  • oral and/or written language skills
  • interview (at the discretion of the program)
  • GRE with a combined score of 950 or higher and a writing score of 4.0 or higher

Program of Study

A minimum of 36 graduate hours in speech-language pathology coursework is necessary to complete the academic requirements of the degree. Additionally, students must complete multiple clinical experiences including on-campus clinical practica as well as a minimum of two externships. Students may choose between a thesis or comprehensive examination.

Program of study for the master of arts in speech-language pathology

 

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Year

1

SLP6030 Research in SLP 3

SLP6100 Diag. of Speech & Language Disorder 3

SLP6210 Preschool Language Disorders 3

SLP6400 Neuro. Dis.: Aphasia 3

SLP6930:003 Seminar: Clinical Methodology 1

SLP6000 Advanced Practicum 2

SLP6010 Diagnostic Practicum
or
SLP6020 Audiological Practicum 2

Total 17 hours

SLP6300 Phonological/Artic Disorders 3

SLP6220 Lang. Dis. In School-Age 2

SLP6450 Neurology Dis: TBI/Dem 2

SLP6600 Voice Disorders 3

SLP6000 Advanced Practicum 2

SLP6010 Diagnostic Practicum
or
SLP6020 Audiological Practicum 2

 

 

Total 14 hours

HSHS6000 Stats 7 Res
HSHS Prof* 3

SLP6000 (SSII) Advanced
Practicum 2

SLP6500 Motor Speech Disorders 3

SLP6650 Dysphagia 2

*or RESM 5110 or RESM 5310

SLP6000 (SS1) Advanced Practicum 2

SLP6010 (SSIV) Diagnostic Practicum
or
SLP6020 (SSIV) Audiological Practicum 2

Total 14 hours

Year

2

SLP5440 Augmentative & Alternative Comm 3

SLP6700 Assess. & Rem. Of Fluency Dis. 3

SLP6940 Internship in SLP 4-8

Total 10-14 hours

SLP6800 Aural Rehabilitation 3

SLP6940 Internship in SLP 4-8

SLP6930:002 Seminar with
Comps Exam 1-3
or
SLP6960 Master’s Thesis 6

Total 10-18 hours

 

*This sequence assumes that no deficiencies in normal bases of speech/language/audiology requirements exist.

Occupational Therapy Program

The occupational therapy program provides a sequence of coursework, field placements, and capstone experiences that culminate in the occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) degree. The OTD program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education of the American Occupational Therapy Association. Graduates with the OTD are eligible to take the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy examination and to become licensed to practice as a registered occupational therapist.

Occupational Therapy Doctorate

Admission

Due to the sequential nature of the curriculum, matriculation to the OTD program occurs fall semester only. Applications may be submitted anytime after September 1st for admission the following academic year. If you have questions, please contact us at 419-530-6670.

The following criteria are used for admission

  • Bachelor degree in any field of study; minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0; must be completed prior to starting the program
  • GRE with minimum mean percentile rank of 33% across all three sections. If the undergraduate GPA is 3.5 or greater or if the applicant has a master’s degree with a GPA of at least 3.0, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required.
  • Prerequisite Courses: Biology (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Human Anatomy and Physiology (6 semester or 8 quarter credits). Introduction to Psychology (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Abnormal Psychology (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Introduction to Sociology or Anthropology (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Lifespan human development: met by either a B- or better in a lifespan human development course (3 semester or 4 quarter credits) that covers human development from birth to death or a B- or better in both a child development (3 semester or 4 quarter credits) course and a gerontology/psychology of aging course (3 semester or 4 quarter credits). Medical Terminology (course or competency test.
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Writing sample

Program of Study

The occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) is a full-time program consisting of eight semesters inclusive of two summer terms. Beginning in 2005, the University of Toledo offered the first OTD in Ohio and the first OTD program in the nation at a public institution. Unique features of the program include fieldwork opportunities in every semester; the opportunity to complete an individualized capstone to develop specialized skills in a practice area of choice, and the opportunity to complete a portion of required fieldwork at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

Program Sequence for Occupational Therapy Doctoral Program

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Year

1

OCCT700 Conceptual Framework of Therp Occup   3

OCCT701 Occupational Therapy Models Practice I   5

OCCT711 Research in Occupational Therapy I       4

OCCT721 Occupational Therapy Advocacy I          2

OCCT731 Fieldwork & Professional Dev Seminar I   1

Total 15 hours

OCCT702 Occupational Therapy Models Practice I 5

OCCT703 Occupational Therapy Models Practice II 4

OCCT812 Research in Occupational Therapy II     3

OCCT740 Conditions of Occupational Therapy      2

OCCT732 Fieldwork & Profess Dev Seminar II      1


Total 15 hours

OCCT704 Occupational therapy Models Practice IV 5

OCCT722 Occupational Therapy
Advocacy II                                                         2

OCCT733 Fieldwork & Professional Dev Seminar III 1

 

 

Total 8 hours

Year

2

OCCT805 Occupational Therapy Models of Prac V     5

OCCT806 Occupational Therapy Models of Prac VI   4

OCCT823 Occupational Therapy Advocacy III          2

OCCT834 Fieldwork & Professional Dev Seminar IV   1

OCCT813 Research in Occupational Therapy III      3

Total 15 hours

   

 

Year

3

 

OCCT836 Fieldwork Level II (continued)              3

OCCT837 Fieldwork Level II                                6

 

 

  Total 9 hours

OCCT814 Research in Occupational Therapy IV    3

OCCT838 Capstone Practicum                            6

OCCT890 Mentored Capstone Dissemination        3

OCCT891 Mentored Studies
in Capstone Area                                               3
or
Elective in Capstone area                                   3

Total 15 hours

 

Occupational Therapy Doctorate/Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Science

The dual degree of occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in exercise science is designed to meet the growing need for occupational therapy faculty members who are prepared to conduct and mentor research. The graduates of the dual degree program will not only have the credentials but also the skills needed for successful careers in academia.

Admission to the OTD/Ph.D. is a two-step process. The first step is admission to the OTD program. See the occupational therapy doctorate section for admission requirements. In the second semester of the OTD program, the student applies for admission to the Ph.D. in exercise science. If selected for admission, the student will be officially admitted to the Ph.D. program in exercise science at the beginning of the second year in the OTD program. Students may apply up to 18 credits of their OTD program for credit in the Ph.D. program. Please contact the occupational therapy program at occtherapydoctorate@utoledo.edu or the department of kinesiology for more information on the dual degree.

Occupational Therapy Doctorate/Doctor of Philosophy in Health Education

The dual degree of occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in health education is designed to meet the growing need for occupational therapy faculty members who are prepared to conduct and mentor research. The graduates of the dual degree program will not only have the credentials but also the skills needed for successful careers in academia.

Admission to the OTD/Ph.D. is a two-step process. The first step is to be admitted to the OTD program. See the occupational therapy doctorate section for admission requirements. During the OTD program, the student completes the second step by applying for admission to the Ph.D. in health education. Students may apply up to 21 credits of their OTD program for credit in the Ph.D. program. Please contact the occupational therapy program at occtherapydoctorate@utoledo.edu or the department of health and recreation professions for more information on the dual degree.

 Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program

The doctor in physical therapy (DPT) program at the University of Toledo is fully accredited by The Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).The degree consists of 92 credit hours spanning 32 months beyond the bachelor’s degree. Upon successful completion of physical therapy program, graduates are eligible to take the national licensure examination.

Doctorate of Physical Therapy

The deadline for applications for the DPT Program at UT is October 1st prior to the year of anticipated matriculation into the Program (fall enrollment only). The following courses must be completed at the time of application:

  • All biology and chemistry prerequisites
  • One (1) of the physics prerequisites
  • One (1) of the psychology prerequisites
  • One (1) of either Human Anatomy with lab, Human Physiology with lab, or Exercise Physiology with lab

The University of Toledo participates in the Physical Therapist Centralized Application System (PTCAS). Please use their website to apply to our program (www.ptcas.org).  

Admission

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0
  • Minimum prerequisite GPA of 3.0
  • Prerequisites include:

        One (1) course on a semester-based system in each of the following:

                        Human Anatomy with lab

                        Human Physiology with lab*

                        Exercise Physiology with lab*

                        Technical Writing

                        Statistics

                        **Or two courses of Human A&P combined, both with labs

 

     Two (2) courses on a semester-based system in each of the following:

                        Biology for science majors with lab

                        Chemistry for science majors with lab

                        Physics (algebra-based)

                        Psychology

  • Statement of purpose
  • Three letters of recommendation; one must be from a physical therapist and two (2) others from non-relatives
  • Interview
  • Knowledge of the field of physical therapy
  • Shadowing a physical therapist is highly recommended to obtain knowledge of the field; however, there is not a minimum number of hours of observation or shadowing required

Program of Study

This three year full-time degree includes clinical and specialty internships as well as a scholarly project.

 

Program Sequence for Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

 

Summer Semester

Year

1

PHYT500 Gross Anatomy                  4

PHYT505 Analysis of Movement         3

PHYT511 Clinical Pathophysiology     3

PHYT535 Intro to Examination         2

PHYT545 Foundations of PT             2

PHYT575 Clinical Reasoning I          1

 

Total 15 hours

PHYT506 Analysis of Movement II             1

PHYT507 Neuroscience                             3

PHYT508 Neuroscience Seminar                 1

PHYT517 Research Design & Measurement 2

PHYT527 Applied Exercise Physiology         3

PHYT528 Therapeutic Interventions I          2

PHYT 530 Principles of Therapeutic Exercise 2

PHYT585 Clinical Practicum I 1

Total 15 hours

PHYT502 Lifespan I                    2

PHYT518 Applied Biostatistics     2

PHYT 529 Therapeutic
Interventions II                         2

PHYT565 Pharmacology             1

PHYT586 Clinical Practicum II     1

Total 8 Hours

Year

2

PHYT617 Scholarly Project I                 2

PHYT626 Cardiovascular-Pulmonary PT 3

PHYT 610 Health Promotion                2

PHYT646 Teaching & Learning            2

PHYT650 Musculoskeletal Rehab I      3

PHYT660 Neuromuscular Rehab I       3

Total 15 hours

PHYT602 Lifespan II                                 2

PHYT605 Health Care Policy & Delivery       1

PHYT618 Scholarly Project II                    2

PHYT651 Musculoskeletal Rehab II            3

PHYT661 Neuromuscular Rehab II             3

PHYT672 Special Topics in PT                   2
(to meet the 2 hour
elective requirement)

PHYT675 Clinical Reasoning II                  1

Total 14 hours

PHYT685 Clinical Practicum III     4

PHYT619 Scholarly Project III      1

PHYT670 Professional Issues       1

 

 

 

Total 6 hours

Year

3

PHYT705 Practice Management             2

PHYT720 Scholarly Project IV                1

PHYT710 PT Mgmt of Complex Patients  3

PHYT762 Trauma Rehab                       2

PHYT789 Clinical Internship I               4

Total 12 hours

PHYT790 Clinical Internship II                    4

PHYT799 Specialty Internship                    4

 

 

Total 8 hours

 

Doctorate in Physical Therapy/Doctor of Philosophy in Exercise Science

There is a significant demand for physical therapists who have attained the additional doctor of philosophy degree to serve as core faculty in academic positions to educate DPT students and to serve as physical therapists with clinical expertise and research experience to expand the knowledge base of the profession.

Admission to the DPT/PhD program is a two-step process. The first step is to be admitted to the DPT program. Students interested in being considered for the PhD in exercise science degree program in the department of kinesiology will then apply to that program in the second semester of the first year of the DPT program. This process will follow the established procedures for application to the department of kinesiology’s doctoral program. If selected for admission, the student will be officially admitted to the PhD program at the beginning of the second year in the DPT Program. Students may apply up to 18 credits of their DPT to their PhD program.

 

SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY, LEGAL SPECIALTIES, AND COUNSELOR EDUCATION

MARTIN RITCHIE, chair

Introduction

The department offers a master's degree in counselor education with concentrations in school counseling and clinical mental health counseling, a master's degree and educational specialist in school psychology, and the doctorate in counselor education. In addition, graduate certificates in elder law and in patient advocacy are available in a distance learning format.

School Psychology

The graduate program in school psychology prepares students to become licensed school psychologists. The program is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Both the master of arts and educational specialist degree requirements must be completed to be licensed as a school psychologist in Ohio and for becoming a nationally certified school psychologist. The program is designed for three years of full-time study.

Admission

Application deadlines for the school psychology program are February 15 and June 15. To apply to the program, applicants must meet the minimum academic prerequisite and submit the following materials:

  • Minimum academic prerequisite: Undergraduate GPA of 2.7 (for admission to the College of Graduate Studies) and for the school psychology program, a preferred undergraduate GPA of 3.0
  • GRE scores (taken within the last five years) with a preferred combined score of 1000.
  • College of Graduate Studies application for the master’s degree in school psychology
  • Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which must address the applicant’s academic potential (i.e., from a university faculty member)
  • Statement of purpose, between two to three pages, that details the reasons the applicant would like to pursue a career in school psychology and includes personal experiences. The statement of purpose should be typed and submitted to the College of Graduate Studies as a separate word document.
  • Official undergraduate transcripts (and graduate transcripts, if applicable)
  • Professional résumé

To be consistent with national training standards and to ensure sufficient faculty members to advise and mentor students, a limited number of applicants will be admitted into the program each year. As a result, admission is competitive. Applicants are required to interview with an admissions committee. Prior to participating in the campus interview, applicants must interview a school psychologist. The list of questions to ask during the school psychologist interview as well as other information about the program can be found on the website. For more information or to ask questions, contact Wendy Cochrane, Program Coordinator 419-530-2013 or Sue Martin, Department Secretary, smartin@utnet.utoledo.edu, 419-530-2718.

Program of Study

The complete program includes approximately 79 credits, a two-semester practica experience during the second year, and a 9-month, full-time internship (minimum of 1200 clock hours) in a school setting completed during the third year. Students earn a master of arts (M.A.) after completing a minimum of 32 hours of coursework and 100 pre-practica experience hours. The educational specialist (Ed.S.) degree is earned after completion of the remaining coursework, practica experience and internship.

Program Sequence for School Psychology

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

 

Summer Semester

Year

1

RESM5110 Qualitative Methods I                            3

SPSY5030 Role and Function of School Psych          3

EDP5330 Behavior Management                            3

SPED5000 Issues in Special Education                   3

SPSY5040 Legal and Ethical Issues in School Psych 3

Total 15 hours

RESM5310 Educational Research                         3

SPSY5170 Consultation I: Theory and Practice      3

SPSY5300 Psychoed Assessment & intervention I   4

SPSY6260 Developmental Child Psychopathology   3

 Total 13 hours

SPSY5310 Psychoed Assessment & Interven II     4

SPSY7180 Consultation II: School & Home            3


Total 7 hours

Year

2

SPSY7320 Psychoed Assessment & Intervention III 4

COUN5/7140 Counseling Theories & Techniques     4

SPSY7330 School Psychology Practicum I              4

Total 12 hours

EDP5210 Child Development                              3

COUN5/7160 Cultural Diversity                          3

SPSY7340 School Psychology Practicum II          4

EDP5/7320 Instructional Psychology                  3

Total 13 hours

SPSY7190 Consultation III: School & Community 3

 

Total 3 hours

Year

3

SPSY7940 Internship in School Psychology         6

SPSY7940 Internship in School Psychology        6

SPSY7940 Internship in School Psychology        6                         

Counselor Education Program

The counselor education program offers a master of arts in counselor education with specialization in school counseling or clinical mental health counseling, and a doctoral degree in counselor education and supervision. All counselor education programs are nationally accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

Clinical mental health counseling prepares graduates for licensure in Ohio as professional counselors or professional clinical counselors and is approved by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker, Marriage and Family Therapist Board. Graduates work as counselors in community mental health agencies, hospitals, college counseling centers, or in private practice. School counselors work in K-12 schools. The doctor of philosophy in counselor education and supervision prepares graduates as counselor educators in colleges and universities, and as counselors, supervisors or directors in agencies, or as private practitioners. Counselor education programs meet educational requirements for licensure or certification in Ohio, Michigan and most other states.

Master of Arts in Counselor Education: School Counseling Program

The school counseling specialization prepares graduates to work in K-12 schools. It is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs and is approved by the Ohio Department of Education. The master's degree in school counseling meets the academic requirements for K-12 school counselor licensure in Ohio and other states. Neither Ohio nor Michigan requires applicants to have teacher certification to be licensed as a school counselor. Applicants expecting to practice outside of Ohio or Michigan should consult that state’s department of education to determine current certification or licensure requirements.

Admission

The application deadlines are September 15, January 15, or May 15. To apply to the program, applicants must meet all requirements of the College of Graduate Studies and submit the following materials to the College of Graduate Studies:

  • College of Graduate Studies application for the master’s degree in school counseling
  • Transcripts of an undergraduate degree with a 3.0 or equivalent cumulative grade point average on a 4-point scale for all undergraduate study at all institutions attended.
  • An official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score taken within the last five years. Students should contact the College of Graduate Studies regarding what constitutes an official GRE score report.
    • Applicants holding a doctoral degree from an accredited college or university are automatically excluded from the requirement to submit an official Graduate Record Examination score.
    • Applicants holding a master’s degree from an accredited college or university and whose cumulative graduate course work meets or exceeds 3.5 on a 4.0 scale are automatically excluded from the requirement to submit an official Graduate Record Examination score.
    • A typed, written personal statement (suggested length 2-3 pages) detailing significant personal and professional experiences that relate to the applicant’s decision to pursue a career in counseling (e.g., rationale for seeking degree, commitment to counseling as a profession). The personal statement should also address such topics as the applicant’s skills or knowledge, preparation through education and/or experience, strengths and weaknesses, rationale for academic deficiencies, etc.
    • A professional résumé.
    • Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which must address the applicant’s academic potential (i.e., from a university faculty member)

To be consistent with national training standards and to ensure sufficient faculty members to advise and mentor students, a limited number of applicants will be admitted into the program each year. As a result, admission is competitive. Applicants who pass the initial screening are required to interview with an admissions committee. For more information or to ask questions, contact Sue Martin, Department Secretary, smartin@utnet.utoledo.edu 419-530-2718.

Program of Study

The master's degree consists of a minimum of 48 semester hours of study, including a 600 clock hour internship in a school setting. The degree is available for full-time or part-time students.

Program of study for the master of arts in counselor education: school counseling

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year

1

COUN 5110 Career Counseling & Development  3 

COUN 5120 Individual & Group Assessment      3

COUN5140 Counseling Theories & Techniques   4

COUN5150 Counseling Across the Lifespan       3

 Total 13 hours

COUN5010 Pro Orientation to School Counseling   4 

COUN5130 Group Counseling                              4

Cultural Diversity for Counselors                         3

Consultation I                                                    3

 Total 14 hours

Year

2

COUN5190 Counseling Practicum                    4

SPSY5040 Legal & Ethical Issues                    3

HSHS6000 Statistics & Research for HSHS      3

 Total 10 hours

COUN6940 Counseling Internship                      8

Elective                                                       3-4

 

 Total 11-12 hours

Note: Most of these classes also are offered in the Summer and some are offered through Distance Learning.

School Counseling Licensure Endorsement Program

Any licensed or license-eligible professional counselor or professional clinical counselor or any student in the clinical mental health counseling program who wants school counselor licensure, but is not seeking admission to the master’s degree in school counseling, must apply for admission to the school counseling licensure endorsement program. The application consists of an application form, official transcripts of graduate work in counseling, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement clarifying the reasons the applicant wishes to become a licensed school counselor. The applicant may be required to appear for an interview. Students must be admitted to the endorsement program before they will be permitted to enroll in the required 600 clock-hour internship.

Master of Arts in Counselor Education: Clinical Mental Health Counseling

The master's degree in the area of clinical mental health counseling is a prerequisite for licensure as a professional counselor or professional clinical counselor in Ohio and other states. It is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs as a Community Counseling program and is approved by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker, Marriage and Family Therapist Board. This degree prepares students to work in mental health agencies, substance abuse agencies, private practice, and a wide variety of settings including hospitals, colleges, and the criminal justice system. Applicants expecting to practice outside Ohio or Michigan should consult that state’s counseling board to determine current certification or licensure requirements.

Admission

The application deadlines are September 15, January 15, or May 15. To apply to the program, applicants must meet all requirements of the College of Graduate Studies and submit the following materials to the College of Graduate Studies:

  • College of Graduate Studies application for the master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling
  • Transcripts of an undergraduate degree with a 3.0 or equivalent cumulative grade point average on a 4-point scale for all undergraduate study at all institutions attended.
  • An official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score taken within the last five years. Students should contact the College of Graduate Studies regarding what constitutes an official GRE score report.
    • Applicants holding a doctoral degree from an accredited college or university are automatically excluded from the requirement to submit an official Graduate Record Examination score.
    • Applicants holding a master’s degree from an accredited college or university and whose cumulative graduate course work meets or exceeds 3.5 on a 4.0 scale are automatically excluded from the requirement to submit an official Graduate Record Examination score.
    • A typed, written personal statement (suggested length 2-3 pages) detailing significant personal and professional experiences that relate to the applicant’s decision to pursue a career in counseling (e.g., rationale for seeking degree, commitment to counseling as a profession). The personal statement should also address such topics as the applicant’s skills or knowledge, preparation through education and/or experience, strengths and weaknesses, rationale for academic deficiencies, etc.
    • A professional résumé.
    • Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which must address the applicant’s academic potential (i.e. from a university faculty member).
    • To be consistent with national training standards and to ensure sufficient faculty members to advise and mentor students, a limited number of applicants will be admitted into the program each year. As a result, admission is competitive. Applicants who pass the initial screening are required to interview with an admissions committee. For more information or to ask questions, contact Program Coordinator or Sue Martin, Department Secretary, at smartin@utnet.utoledo.edu or 419-530-2718.

Program of Study

The curriculum leading to the master of arts degree in counselor education with a specialization in clinical mental health counseling consists of a minimum of 60 semester hours of training. Applicants seeking licensure as professional counselors or professional clinical counselors in Ohio need to insure that at least 20 of their 60 semester hours of study meet the five areas of clinical practice required by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker, and Marriage and Family Therapist Board.

Program of study for the master of arts degree in counselor education: clinical mental health counseling

The curriculum leading to the master’s degree in counselor education: clinical mental health counseling consists of the following:

Program Sequence for Master of Arts in Counselor Education: Clinical Mental Health Counseling

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year

1

COUN5020 Pro Orientation to Community Counseling 3

COUN5110 Career Counseling & Development          3

COUN5120 Individual & Group Assessment              3

COUN6240 Diagnosis & Mental Health                     4

Total 13 hours

COUN5130 Group Counseling                          4

COUN5140 Counseling Theories & Techniques   4 

COUN5150 Counseling Across the Lifespan       3

COUN5160 Cultural Diversity for Counselors     3

Total 14 hours

Year

2

COUN5190 Counseling Practicum                      4

COUN7540 Advanced Personality Assessment    4

HSHS6000 Statistics & Research for HSHS        3

Elective                                                        3-4

 Total 14-15 hours

COUN6940 Counseling Internship                  8

COUN6210 Psychopathology                         4

Elective                                                 3-4

Elective                                                 3-4

 Total 18-20 hours

Note: Most of these classes also are offered in the Summer and some are offered through Distance Learning.

Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education

The doctor of philosophy degree (Ph.D.) in counselor education and supervision and prepares students for careers in community agencies, schools, colleges and universities, and private practice. Opportunities exist within this program to create areas of specialization that are relevant to the academic, professional, or research interests of the student.The program objectives and curricular experiences of the doctoral program reflect an extension of those offered in the master’s programs.

Admission

Persons applying for admission to doctoral study must meet the admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies, the Judith Herb College of Education Health Science and Human Service, and the counselor education program. These requirements include an application for graduate admission, one set of official transcripts from each institution attended showing any and all undergraduate/graduate credits and degrees attained, three letters of recommendation, and a non-refundable application fee that must be submitted to the College of Graduate Studies to begin the admission process. In addition, counselor education program requirements for admission to the doctoral program are:

  • A minimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0-point scale for all graduate-level academic work
  • A master’s degree in counseling from a program that is approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Applicants with degrees from non-accredited programs must demonstrate their equivalency to approved programs or make up any deficiencies that may be present in their training.
  • GRE scores (taken within the last five years) with a preferred combined score (verbal plus quantitative) of 1000
  • A résumé and autobiographical statement of three to five pages in length
  • One writing sample. The writing sample consists of responses to questions about your academic and professional background and goals. The writing sample is designed to determine your writing ability and your suitability to the profession and to the doctoral program.
  • A personal interview with program faculty to determine the personal and professional suitability and leadership potential of the applicant. Applicants will be notified if they are selected for an interview.
  • Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which must address the applicant’s academic potential (i.e. from a university faculty member).

Applicants are interviewed and admitted to doctoral study during the fall, spring, or summer semesters of each academic year.

For more information or to ask questions, contact Nick Piazza, Doctoral Program Coordinator at 419-530-4721 or email npiazza@utnet.utoledo.edu or contact Sue Martin, Department Secretary, at 419-530-2718 or smartin@utnet.utoledo.edu

Program of Study

The curriculum leading to the doctor of philosophy degree in counselor education consists of a minimum of 60 semester hours. While the degree allows the student to focus on areas of interest, scholarly preparation resulting in a culminating research dissertation is required.

Program Sequence for Ph.D. in Counselor Education (60 Semester hours beyond Master's in Counseling)

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year

1

COUN7510 Supervision in Counseling & Sch Psy    3

COUN7530 Adv Theories Counseling Interventions 4

COUN7220 Child, Adolescent, Family Therapy       3

RESM8120 Quantitative Research II                    3

Total 13 hours

COUN7520 Education & Leadership in MH Prof                4

COUN7930 Doctoral Research Seminar                          3

COUN8410 Adv Practicum in Counseling Interventions    4

RESM7330 Qualitative Research I                                 3

Total 14 hours

Year

2

COUN8940 Counseling Internship                    4

RESM8320 Research Design                           3

RESM Elective                                            3-4

Elective                                                      3-4

Total 13-15 hours

COUN8940 Counseling Internship                                 4

COUN8480 Adv Training Prof, Legal, Ethical                   3

Elective                                                                     3

Total 10 hours

Year

3

COUN8960 Doctoral Research Dissertation           5

  Total 5 hours

COUN8960 Doctoral Research Dissertation                         5

Total 5 hours

Graduate Certificates

The elder law and the patient advocacy certificates are offered on-line as stand-alone certificates that are available to persons holding bachelor degrees. The coursework may be used as part of a degree program but a separate application for the certificate must be made.

Elder Law Certificate

The Elder Law Certificate is an online graduate certificate consisting of 15 credit hours. The program is designed to enhance the professional credentials of individuals working with an elderly population. Students are admitted for the summer semester and must complete an on-line application. A minimum of 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (GPA) is required as well as two letters of recommendation.

The program of study consists of courses offered in summer and fall semesters.

        LGL        6100        Legal Issues for the Elderly

        LGL        6200        Elder Health Law and Ethical Issues

        LGL        6980        Guided Study in Elder Law Topics

        GERO     540          Health and Aging

        GERO     541          Issues in Contemporary Gerontological Practice

Patient Advocacy Certificate

The 12-semester credit graduate certificate program in Patient Advocacy is offered online and is designed to enhance the professional credentials of those working with patients in today's health care environment. The four-course sequence provides knowledge about contemporary legal and health care issues in the field of Patient Advocacy and is offered online in a program that can be completed in two semesters. Students are admitted for the fall semester and must complete an on-line application. A minimum 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (GPA) is required, as well as two [RS18] letters of recommendation.

The program of study consists of four courses offered in fall and spring semesters.

       LGL       6300       Introduction to Patient Advocacy

       LGL       6400       Health Issues and Patient Advocacy

       LGL       6500       Legal Issues in Patient Advocacy

       LGL       6600       Guided Study in Patient Advocacy Topics

 

 

 

Last Updated: 3/23/15