Provost's Office

College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences

College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences
G
raduate Programs

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Curriculum
Internships
Requirements
Requirements for the Master’s Program
Eligibility
Academic Standards


Department of Communication

Richard Knecht, Graduate Adviser

Certificate in Communication Studies

The graduate certificate in communication studies is designed to provide advanced study in professional and organizational communication. The certificate of communication studies requires the successful completion of 15 credit hours in communication studies. The certificate can be earned separately or as a part of the master of liberal studies degree. See the master of liberal studies program for details on the master of liberal studies with a certificate in communication studies.

 

Application

Those applying to work on the certificate alone must be admitted to the Graduate School and submit an application form and letter of interest to the department of communication. Those applying to complete the certificate and the masters of liberal studies should also contact the director of the master of liberal studies program.

 

Requirements

The certificate consists of 15 credit hours of graduate courses in communication studies. Students may use the courses completed for the certificate in the electives portion of the master of liberal studies degree.

 

Curriculum

COMM 6210 Principles and Practices of Visual Communication

COMM 6220 Communication, Technology, and Society COMM 6230 Communication, Propaganda, and Persuasion COMM 6240 Communication, Ethics, and the Workplace

COMM 6250 Correcting Conflict Communication in Organizations

COMM 6260 Business, Communication and Technology

COMM 6270 Special Topics in Communication Studies


Department of Economics

 Michael Dowd, Chair
D
avid Black, Director of Graduate Studies

Requirements for the Master’s Program

 The economics department offers the master of arts in economics degree, the master of arts in economics degree with an applied econometrics specialization, and the master of arts in economics and education degree. In all cases, students must complete a minimum of 30 hours of graduate work that includes the following:

1.    At least 21 hours of graduate credit in economics (excluding ECON 6930) must be included within the total of 30 hours presented for any graduate degree. The minimum of 21 hours in economics must include at least one course from each of two different fields, in addition to the following basic theory requirements (or their equivalents):

(a) ECON 5150 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory

(b)ECON 5200 Advanced Microeconomic Theory

(c) ECON 5300 Introduction to Mathematical Economics

(d)ECON 5810 Econometrics Models and Methods I

The graduate adviser may waive the ECON 5300 requirement for students who have an adequate background in mathematics.

2.    Credits in excess of seven hours in economics courses numbered 6000 through 6990 will not ordinarily be applicable to the 30 hours.

3.    Candidates for either degree are required to pass a comprehensive written examination in macroeconomics and microeconomics. In addition, the department may require an oral examination.

4.    In addition to the 30 hours of course work, candidates must satisfy a writing requirement of either a thesis or a seminar paper.

A candidate who elects the thesis option must submit a thesis for review by a committee of at least three faculty members and satisfy Graduate School thesis requirements. Such a candidate may receive a maximum of seven credit hours following the successful defense of that thesis. A candidate who elects the non-thesis option must submit a seminar paper, or its equivalent, for review by at least two faculty members. No credit hours will be earned for the seminar paper.

Early Admission to Master’s Degree Program in Economics

A special opportunity exists for undergraduate students at the University of Toledo interested in pursuing a Master’s of Arts Degree in Economics. Being evaluated by the same criteria as graduate students, undergraduate students have the opportunity to apply advanced-level work to their undergraduate degree requirements while, at the same time, securing a significant “head start” toward satisfying the requirements for a master’s degree in Economics. Qualifying undergraduate students are allowed to apply particular courses (and associated credit hours) towards both their undergraduate and graduate degree requirements.

If accepted into this program undergraduate students may register for up to 3 graduate-level Economics courses (9 credit hours). Because the M.A. degree in Economics requires 30 credit hours of graduate-level work, students who complete 9 of those hours as an undergraduate student have to complete only 21 additional credit hours as a graduate student to receive their master’s degree.

 Undergraduate students with a declared major or minor in Economics and a cumulative GPA in Economics courses of 3.3 or higher are eligible for this program. Students accepted into this program must consult and receive prior approval from the Department of Economics’ graduate director as to which courses at the University of Toledo may be applied for dual credit toward both undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. Students interested in this program are encouraged to speak with the Department of Economics’ Chair, graduate director, or undergraduate advisor for additional information and the application form for this program

Specialization in Econometrics

The master’s program with an applied econometrics specialization is designed to afford interested, well-qualified candidates for the master’s in economics an opportunity to study econometrics on a more intensive and applied basis. The applied econometrics specialization would enable candidates to develop applied econometric skills through hands- on research combined with textbook-lecture learning.

The specialization in applied econometrics is an option in the M.A. program in economics. Students who elect the specialization option will normally need two full years of study to complete the program. In the first year, an M.A. candidate in the specialization will complete the regular M.A. core requirements, an additional econometric course (ECON 5820), and field/related course work. Further, the M.A. candidate is required to pass a written comprehensive examination in econometrics, as well as the usual written comprehensive examinations required of all students. In the second year of the program, the candidate will enroll in a sequence of two applied econometrics seminars (ECON 6810 and ECON 6820) and engage in thesis work.

Internships

The department offers a public service internship, requiring seven credit hours of ECON 6940. In addition to ECON 6940, the intern is allowed to include up to three credit hours of either ECON 6900 or 6990 toward the 30 credit hours required for a master of arts degree.

Master of Arts and Education

For the degree of master of arts and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service graduate section of this catalog.

Department of English Language and Literature

Sara Lundquist, Chair
C
hristina Fitzgerald, Director of Graduate Studies

Requirements for the Master’s Program

M.A. in English with a Concentration in Literature

The M.A. degree (literature concentration) requires 33 hours of course work. Graduate students who are accepted into the program as teaching assistants are further required to take ENGL 6010 Seminar in English Instruction: Composition, an additional three-hour course, for a total of 36 hours earned separately from the degree.

All students working toward the master of arts with a concentration in literature must satisfy the following requirements:

(a)    The course work shall include ENGL 5100 History of the English Language; either ENGL 5750

History of Literary Criticism or ENGL 5780 Contemporary Literary Theories and Criticism; ENGL 5790 Approaches to Research in English; and two seminars (excluding instructional seminars – see schedule of classes for seminar listings). Students who have completed any of these course requirements or their equivalents at the graduate level before admission to the Graduate School may petition the director of graduate studies in English for substitutions.

(b) Of the remaining 18 hours of course work for the degree, students may take a maximum of two courses from other departments in the humanities, fine arts or social sciences, as approved by the director of graduate studies. Students may count two creative writing courses and one independent study course toward the degree.

(c) Students are required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. Passing a special examination administered by the department of foreign languages will satisfy this requirement. International students with a native language other than English will be considered to have satisfied the requirement, as will any student having achieved a grade of C or better in an upper-division or graduate literature course offered by the department of foreign languages (excluding courses where texts are read in English translation). Students may also fulfill this requirement by achieving a B or better in both ENGL/LING 5110 Old English and ENGL/LING 5120 Middle English.

(d) Candidates must successfully pass the MA Exam and submit a satisfactory MA Portfolio, details of which can be found on the department web site.

 

Certificate in the Teaching of Writing

A certificate in the teaching of writing can be earned as part of the master’s degree in English (literature concentration). The certificate also can be earned separately from the degree.

The certificate is designed to offer continuing education for regional high school teachers of English and composition; to offer specialized education in composition to those earning master’s degrees who wish to pursue work as teachers of writing at regional community colleges and area universities; and to provide graduate students with the opportunity to earn job credentials in composition, as well as in literature.

 

Application

Those applying for both the M.A. in English and the certificate in the teaching of writing program should submit an application form for each to the Graduate School office, along with their other application materials.

Those applying to work on the certificate alone must hold an undergraduate degree in English and submit an application form, a letter of interest, all college and graduate school transcripts, and two letters of recommendation.

 

Requirements

Fifteen hours of course work are required for completion of the certificate:

Theory

ENGL 5780   Literary Theories and Criticism
ENGL 5090   Current Writing Theory

Pra xi s

ENGL 6010   Instruction in Composition

This course assumes experience in teaching. Those not presently teaching will be asked to work with a teacher to gain that experience.

Methods

ENGL 6180   Methods in Composition Course Design and Assessment

Research

ENGL 6890   Certificate Capstone

Those students working on the master’s degree also must fulfill all requirements of that degree.

No transfer of credits from other institutions will be allowed, although those students who complete ENGL 4090 while undergraduates at The University of Toledo will not be required to take ENGL 5090 if they received a grade of B or higher.

M.A. in English with a Concentration in English as a Second Language (E.S.L.)

The M.A. in E.S.L. includes 33 to 35 hours of course work.

Students working toward the master of arts degree with a concentration in E.S.L. must satisfy these specific requirements:

(a) The course work shall include ENGL 5100, 5150, 6940, 6150, 6160 and 6170, and one course to be prescribed by the adviser.

(b) The remaining 12 hours required for the degree must include CI 5430, ENGL 6190 and an additional six hours (including no more than one additional course outside of English and linguistics) as approved by the graduate adviser. Students who have completed any of the above required courses or their equivalent before their admission to the Graduate School may petition the graduate adviser in the department of English language and literature for substitutions. Students may count up to one independent study course toward the degree.

(c) Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language by having earned a grade of C or better in a course at the 3000-level or above, or by passing an examination administered by the department of foreign languages.

(d) Candidates must also complete a thesis (ENGL 6960, one to three hours).

 

Master of Arts and Education

For the degree of master of arts and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service graduate section of this catalog.

M.A. and Ed. Degree in Literature

The master of arts and education in literature degree can include either 30 or 36 hours of course work.

The literature program has the following requirements: a minimum of 18 hours shall include ENGL 5100, either ENGL 5750 or 5780, and two seminars (excluding instructional seminars); and the completion of a capstone experience in either the College of Education (a thesis or a project) or the Department of English (the MA Exam and MA Portfolio).They also must satisfy the requirements specified by the College of Education

M.A. and Ed. Degree in English as a Second Language (E.S.L.)

The M.A. and Ed. degree in E.S.L. includes from 33 to 35 hours of course work.

The English as a second language program requires the following: a minimum of 10 hours in linguistics, including ENGL substituted in consultation with the graduate studies adviser); a minimum of 10 hours in E.S.L. which must include ENGL 6170 and 6060 and CI 5430; a thesis or project (one to three hours); and reading proficiency.

in one foreign language as required by the master of arts degree. Students also must satisfy the requirements specified by the College of Education.

Students should obtain from the department of English language and literature the appropriate information pamphlet that describes in detail departmental regulations and procedures for the M.A. or the M.A. and Ed. degree, and includes the reading list.

Department of Foreign Languages

Ruth A. Hottell, Chair
R
uth Hottell, French Graduate Adviser
A
n Chung Cheng, Spanish Graduate Adviser
F
riederike Emonds, German Graduate Adviser

Requirements for the Master’s Program in French, German and

Spanish
Students must complete a minimum of 30 semester credit hours for the master of arts and a minimum of 30 semester credit hours for the master of arts and education.

 For the degree of master of arts or master of arts and education with a major in French, German or Spanish, students must meet the following departmental requirements: present an undergraduate major in the language of interest from an accredited college or university; satisfactorily complete at least 18 hours of graduate credit in the major language (including courses 5010 and 5020 in French and German, 5010 and 5110 in Spanish); satisfactorily complete an additional 12 hours in the major language or in approved, cognate courses; pass a comprehensive examination; and demonstrate a reading proficiency in a foreign language other than the major. This may be done either by earning a passing grade in a foreign language course at or above the 3000 level, by passing an examination administered by the department of foreign languages, or by successfully completing a graduate reading course offered by the department. A thesis may be presented for an additional six hours of credit in lieu of the comprehensive examination.

Master of Arts and Education

 For the degree of master of arts and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service graduate section of this catalog.

Department of Geography and Planning

Patrick L. Lawrence, Chair
Daniel J. Hammel, Graduate Adviser

Requirements for the Master’s Program

 For the master of arts degree, students must meet the following departmental requirements, including 36 credit hours of graduate work:

1.          16 of the 36 minimum hours must taken in the department at the 6000 level. Fifteen additional elective hours may be taken at the 5000 or 6000 level within the major. The 6100, 6150, 6910, and 6920 courses are mandatory. This 15-hour requirement may not include the following courses: 6700, 6910, 6940 and 6960.

2.          A minimum of one graduate-level (at least three hours) course or seminar, approved by the adviser, must be taken in a related area outside the department. This may not include an independent study or research course.

3.          The selection of geography and planning courses and related courses should comprise a unified program chosen in consultation with the graduate adviser.

 4.          At the end of the second semester of full-time work, the student takes a comprehensive written and oral exam upon completion of at least nine course credits, maintaining a B grade or better in 6100 and 6150, and a B average or better for all graduate work. Successful completion of the comprehensive exam entitles the student to become a formal candidate for the M.A. degree.

 5.          The student then seeks approval of a thesis topic, formulates a thesis committee, and submits the proposal for approval.

 6.          The student should research and write an approved thesis under the direction of a thesis committee composed of departmental faculty members. The student may select an applied or traditional thesis option.

 7.          Upon completion of the thesis, an oral examination on the student’s research, as it relates to general professional competence, will be required.

 8.          A minimum enrollment to qualify for the master’s degree is two hours of thesis credits, but there may be as many as six hours within the 36 semester hours of graduate work.

 The master’s program is designed to provide a quality multidisciplinary education, foster theoretical and applied research in geography and planning, promote multicultural understanding, complement interdisciplinary work, and support local community outreach programs and grass-roots organizations. Faculty interests and research facilities offer opportunities to pursue intensive programs in community and urban planning, economic geography, geographic information science, environmental geography and planning, or cultural and behavioral geography.

 


Certificate in GIS and Applied Geography

Requirements for completion
Student enrolled full-time can complete the requirements for this 15-credit program in one year. Students admitted into the program for the fall semester should be able to enroll in all the necessary courses within the academic year and can complete their final project by the end of the spring semester.

Specific requirements
Students enrolling in the program will be required to complete a minimum of 12 credits from the list of approved GIS technical courses;

• Students must complete a final three credit project workshop based on a terminal project related to a research problem specific to their discipline;

• Students must maintain a minimum "B" average to complete the certificate program.

• Course selection and the sequence of courses will be agreed upon by the student and the program coordinator to help students complete the program and gain the necessary skills.


Course List

GEPL 5490 Remote Sensing of the Environment

GEPL 5500 Digital Image Analysis

GEPL 5510 Geographic Information Systems

GEPL 5520 Analytical and Computer Cartography

GEPL 5180 Geographic Information System Applications

GEPL 6190 Advanced Geographic Information Systems Seminar

GEPL 6950 Applied Geographics Project Workshop

 


Master of Arts and Education

For the degree of master of arts and education, students must meet requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science and Human Service graduate section of this catalog.

Department of History

William O'Neal, Chair

Cynthia Jo Ingham, Director of Graduate Studies

Admission

All students seeking admission to graduate study are required to provide transcripts, GRE scores, three academic letters of recommendation, and a statement of research interests.  The applicant’s research interests should correlate to the expertise of the history department faculty.  In addition, students whose native language is not English must submit TOEFL scores.  For additional information, see the History Department’s graduate handbook on the departmental website or contact the director of graduate studies.

The History Department graduate committee reviews applications in March, and admitted students begin their programs in the fall. Students accepted by the College of Graduate Studies for spring admission are considered non-degree-seeking students, and their applications will be reviewed by the department in March.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree

The student may earn the M.A. degree by completing either 30 graduate credits, including a thesis; or 36 graduate credits with an examination in lieu of a thesis.  The choice between the two options will lie with the student’s advisor and will be made no later than the second semester of study.  The student must maintain a B average in all graduate work.  Each candidate for the M.A. degree must include within the program one course in historiography and two seminars.

Requirements for the Master of Arts and Education Degree

For the degree of master of arts and education, students must meet the requirements for the degree as stated in the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science, and Human Service graduate section of this catalog.  The master of arts and education degree in history requires at least 21 hours of graduate credit in history or social studies (including historiography and a history seminar) within the total of 36 hours presented for the degree.  To complete the program, students may choose either a written examination or a final project supervised by the student’s advisor in the department of history.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

The doctor of philosophy degree in history requires a minimum of 62 hours beyond the master’s degree, including 24 hours for the dissertation.  Doctoral students must complete four seminars, a course in historiography, and a workshop on teaching.

General Field

The student must stand for examination, written and oral, over one general field, such as U.S. history or modern European history.  See the departmental Graduate Handbook for additional details.

Secondary Concentration

The student must stand for examination in one major area of concentration.  This normally will be the area in which the student will write the dissertation and in which the student has completed seminars and course work.

Minor Field

The student will be examined in a minor area outside the general field.  Selection of this field will be made by the student in consultation with the advisor.

Foreign Language Competency

Every student, before taking the comprehensive examination, must pass an examination in a foreign language.  The choice of the language required will lie with the student’s advisor.

Master of Liberal Studies Program

Jerry Van Hoy, Director

Richard Knecht, Adviser for Communication Studies

The Master of Liberal Studies (MLS) Program at The University of Toledo seeks to provide an intellectually challenging and academically rigorous education to non-traditional students with bachelor’s degrees who desire additional study in the liberal arts. By its very nature, the MLS Program encourages interdisciplinary thinking and respects diverse philosophical and methodological approaches to knowledge. After a series of core seminars, a student creates his or her own program of study under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The master of liberal studies program works cooperatively with the various departments and undergraduate interdisciplinary studies programs to offer meaningful experiences for students. The MLS degree may be completed via distance learning or on campus. For further information, please see the master of liberal studies web page at http://www.utoledo.edu/llss/mls or contact the director at jerry.vanhoy@utoledo.edu.

A certificate in communication studies is available through the master of liberal studies program. See the department of communication for details.

Admission

All students seeking admission to the master of liberal studies program must file an application with the College of Graduate Studies. Application materials consist of an application form, a statement of purpose, writing sample, post-secondary transcripts (not necessary for applicants with a UT degree), and three letters of reference. Students with an undergraduate GPA of less than 2.70 must also submit GRE scores to be considered for admission. Applicants may request or may be requested to have an interview with the director.

Requirements for the Master of Liberal Studies Degree

For the master of liberal studies degree, students must complete the following requirements, totaling 33 hours of study:

 Core seminars (12 hours):

• MLS Seminar in the Humanities (MLS 6010).

• MLS Seminar in the Social Sciences (MLS 6020).

• MLS Seminar in the Natural Sciences (MLS 6030).

• MLS Seminar in the Visual and Performing Arts (MLS 6040).

Electives, chosen in consultation with the director and an adviser (15-18 hours).

  1. Capstone Requirement (3-6 hours)

Thesis option: A thesis is a written report on original independent research conducted by the student under the supervision of his or her thesis adviser and thesis committee. The thesis must be written in scholarly format, with the appropriate citation format and extensive references. The literature review developed for the thesis proposal should serve as the initial component of the thesis. Typical thesis length: 50 to 70 pages including all tables, figures, and references.

Project option: A project is an applied or creative work. Generally a project will include a product that contributes knowledge via applied research or creative accomplishment (such as video, a course of study, short stories or essays). Projects must include an explanatory essay that includes an explanation of the methods and theory involved. In addition, the document will describe, in summarized fashion, the project development process. The literature review developed for the project proposal may serve as the basis of the explanatory essay. Typical explanatory essay length: 20 to 30 pages, including references.

Elective requirements for the MLS / Communication Studies Certificate

The electives above must be chosen from designated courses offered by the department of communication (15 hours).

Department of Philosophy

John Sarnecki, Chair
M
adeline Muntersbjorn, Graduate Adviser

The Department of Philosophy offers a two-year program of study towards the completion of Master of Arts degree in Philosophy. Admissions are not restricted to students with undergraduate degrees in philosophy. Qualified students from other majors or concentrations will also be considered for admittance. This program

is designed to prepare students for higher level graduate work and success within a top flight Ph.D. program in philosophy as well as prepare students to teach philosophy in graduate school or at a community college level.

Requirements for the Master’s Program

Our degree program includes both a thesis option (which includes an extended written treatment of a topic in the candidate’s area of specialization) and a non-thesis option (which involves additional courses and a qualifying exam in an area of specialization). Both tracks require a minimum of 33 credit hours, though students have the opportunity to pursue additional credits. Students may opt for either track, though students who do not pass the thesis qualifying examination must satisfy the non-thesis requirements to complete their MA.

For the degree of master of arts, students must meet the following departmental requirements:

Thesis option: Completion of at least 27 semester hours of graduate credit in courses offered by the department of philosophy, excluding readings and research courses; pass a qualifying or prospectus examination in the area of the student’s thesis; a written thesis for 6 semester hours of credit; and an oral examination covering the material of the student’s thesis and a general competency in the subject areas relevant to the thesis.

Non-thesis option: Completion of 33 semester hours of graduate credit in courses offered by the department of philosophy, excluding readings and research courses; and completion of an examination in one sub-field or area of competency in contemporary philosophy chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty.

For both options: Completion of PHIL 3000 or 6000 (or its equivalent or satisfied as an undergraduate); completion of PHIL 3210 and 3230 (or their equivalents or satisfied as an undergraduate); and completion of at least 42 semester hours of graduate and undergraduate credit in philosophy.

Students must also satisfy the requirements of the graduate college as specified in the graduate student handbook.

Department of Political Science and Public Administration

Mark E. Denham, Chair
L
ynn Bachelor, Director, M.P.A. Program
R
enee J. Heberle, Director, M.A. Program

Master of Arts in Political Science (M.A.)

The master of arts program is designed to help students become thoroughly grounded in the knowledge base and research methods of political science. The department offers study in five areas of the discipline -- American government (including state and local politics), comparative government, international relations, political theory and methodology.

Admission Requirements

Requirements for admission are a bachelor’s degree from an accredited educational institution, acceptable scores on the GRE General Test, and three letters of recommendation from those in a position to judge the academic qualifications of the applicant. Official results should be sent to the Graduate School. While the Graduate School allows a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.7, those near this threshold should have demonstrated significant improvement in the last two years of their undergraduate work.

Those admitted to the M.A. program normally begin their study during the fall semester. Applications for admission and financial aid should be submitted by March 15, although applications for admission alone are welcome at any time.

Degree Requirements

The requirements for the master of arts in political science are 30 semester credit hours and include:

a.   One required course: PSC 6110 (3 hours);

b.   Three seminars or lecture courses open only to graduate students: several 5000-level courses (3 hours) and    any 6000-level course (3 hours each);

c.   A required master’s thesis: PSC 6960 (6 hours); and

d.   Two courses (6 hours) may be taken outside of the department.

Academic Standards

M.A. students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 overall and in their political science courses. Only those classes with a grade of C or higher may be counted toward the degree. A student receiving two grades below a B (i.e., of 2.67 or less) may be removed from the program.
 

Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.)

The master of public administration (M.P.A.) is a professional degree for those pursuing administrative careers in government and nonprofit organizations. The program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), and serves part-time and mid-career, as well as full-time students.

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the M.P.A. program must satisfy the following requirements:

a.   An undergraduate degree with a minimum GPA of 3.0 calculated on a 4.0 basis;

b.    Scores from the GRE. A combined score of 1,000 in the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE is preferred, and the examination must have been taken in the past two years. With permission, the applicant may substitute scores for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) or the Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT);

c.    Three or four letters of recommendation, which must be academically or employment related. These should be from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic abilities and professional goals. Applicants who obtained their undergraduate degrees in the last five years must submit at least two academic letters; and

d.   A thoughtfully drafted statement of purpose.

Early Admission to M.A. in Political Science and Master of Public Administration Programs

Description

The Early Admission option allows advanced undergraduates with a major or minor in political science or public administration to enroll for graduate level credit in up to 9 hours of 4/5000 level classes. Students accepted in the Early Admission option receive both graduate and undergraduate credit for these classes; undergraduate instructional fees will apply to these three courses.

Eligibility

To be eligible for the Early Admission program, students must have a major or minor in political science or public administration, be within one year of graduation, have a cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher , and submit an application no earlier than three semesters prior to expected completion of the B.A. program.

Application Process

To apply for the Early Admission program, students should complete an Application for Early Admission (available from the Department of Political Science and Public Administration), submit three letters of recommendation (from an undergraduate advisor and two undergraduate course instructors), a one page biographical sketch, and a regular graduate application form to the Chair of the Department of Political Science and Public Administration, MS 511, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606

Students accepted into this option will initially be granted provisional graduate admission to allow them to enroll in 5000-level courses in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration. To receive dual

(undergraduate and graduate credit), the following conditions apply:

•    Courses must be taken at The University of Toledo after acceptance into the Early Admission option

•    Only 5000-level courses in Political Science and Public Administration may be included

•    Must complete all graduate level requirements in the course and be evaluated by the same criteria as graduate students

•    Must complete graduate plan of study indicating courses that will receive graduate and undergraduate credit

 

Degree Requirements

All students must satisfy the following University and program requirements:

a.    Program prerequisites: PSC 3420 (or equivalent), PSC 3110 (or equivalent).

b.   General course work requirements: 12 graduate courses (36 hours), including at least five courses open only to graduate students, of which three must be at the 6000 level, with a minimum GPA of 3.0. This does not include prerequisites or experiential learning (Research Report for In-Service Students or Internship for Pre-Service Students).

c.   Common core requirements:

PSC 5140    Intermediate Social Science Statistics .............................. 3

PSC 5430    Public Personnel Administration .................................... 3

PSC 5440    Budgeting and Financial Administration.......................... 3

PSC 5470    Public Organization Theory ........................................... 3

PSC 6410    Proseminar in Public Administration .............................. 3

PSC 6420    Quantitative Methods in Decision Making ...................... 3

PSC 6430    Seminar in Public Policy Theory & Analysis ................... 3

d.    Electives: Students must take a minimum of five additional courses (15 hours from the list of elective courses in general management, criminal justice, economics and financial administration, health administration, human resources management, nonprofit organizations and urban administration). Electives should be selected in consultation with the M.P.A. adviser and may be used to develop an area of specialization.

e.    Experiential learning: All M.P.A. candidates must demonstrate the application of public administration theory, methods and techniques to a practical job situation. Those employed in a governmental or nonprofit agency at the professional level (in-service students) must complete PSC 5950. Those without government or nonprofit job experience at the professional level (pre-service students) must complete six credit hours of PSC 6940. At the end of the internship, the intern submits a final report and the agency supervisor submits an evaluation of the intern. Pre- service students should begin planning their internships with the program adviser before they expect to receive their degree.

f.    Comprehensive examination: Students must pass a written comprehensive examination. A student who fails the examination may retake it once.

Certificate Program in Management of Non-Profit Organizations

This program is intended both for professionals already working or volunteering in the nonprofit sector, and for students without professional experience who seek to prepare themselves for nonprofit careers.

The fundamental organizational and management principles provided by this program can be used by leaders in the nonprofit sector to strengthen both their systems and service delivery. The Certificate will prepare students tolead and administer nonprofit organizations as paid staff, directors, board members, philanthropists or volunteers in human-service, cultural, educational, religious and community organizations. In addition, students in the MPA and other graduate programs can use their elective hours to earn this certificate.

The program consists of four required courses from the department of political science and public administration and marketing, and one elective selected from an approved list available from the Program Director.

Required courses: Mgmt. of Nonprofit Org (PSC 5410), Budgeting & Financial Admin (PSC 5440), Public Personnel Admin (PSC 5430), Marketing for Nonprofit Org (MKTG 5170), or Marketing Systems (MKTG 5410).

Undergraduate Prerequisite: PSC 3420, Principles of Public Administration or equivalent, or permission of Program Director.

Certificate Program in Municipal Administration

The primary purpose of this certification is to strengthen the professional management skills of personnel in responsible local government administrative positions. These include supervisors, department heads, administrative assistants and others who need more management training to enhance their career prospects. Students in the M.P.A. program may also use their electives to receive this certificate. In addition, this certificate program is appropriate for graduate students in geography and planning and civil engineering who wish to improve their knowledge of administration.

Certificate Program in Health Care Policy and Administration

This program is intended for students who are interested in pursuing mid-level careers in the health-care field or for those already working in the field who want to expand their knowledge without pursuing a formal graduate degree program in health administration. The program is composed of five courses in the departments of political science and public administration, health education, finance, and related areas.

• Health Care Policy (PSC 5330) or Issues in Public Health (PUBH 664)

• Health Care Delivery Systems (PSC 5350) or PUBH 664

• Health Systems Management (PSC 6440)

• Two additional courses chosen from the Departments of Health and Rehabilitative Services, Economics, Sociology, Finance, or Management, in consultation with a faculty adviser from the MPA program.

Joint J.D./M.P.A. Degree

The J.D./M.P.A. dual degree program offers graduate students the opportunity to earn two graduate degrees evidencing the completion of the curriculum for the juris doctor (J.D.) from the College of Law and the curriculum for the master of public administration (M.P.A.) from the College of Arts and Sciences department of political science and public administration. The program is administered jointly by the College of Law and the department of political science and public administration. The program is designed for students who wish to be effective in administrative and regulatory positions in public and in private, nonprofit organizations.

Admission Standards and Requirements

To be admitted to the J.D./M.P.A. program, a student must first be admitted to both the College of Law and the M.P.A. program in the department of political science and public administration. The student must qualify for admission to each degree program, make separate application for admission to each program, and be admitted to each program in order to be eligible for the J.D./M.P.A. program.

After admission to the College of Law and the M.P.A. program in the department of political science and public administration, the student must be admitted to the J.D./M.P.A. program by the coordinating committee.

Requirements for Degrees and Continued P articipation in the Program

Juris Doctor: In order to qualify for the juris doctor from the College of Law, a student must comply with all the academic and nonacademic rules of the college, with respect to the admission process and during the period after initial enrollment in the college until the granting of the degree. The College of Law will grant credit toward the J.D. for certain courses taken in the department of political science and public administration under the J.D./M.P.A. program, as detailed below.

Master of Public Administration Degree: In order to be eligible for the M.P.A. degree from the department of political science and public administration in the College of Arts and Sciences, a student must complete at least 12 graduate-level courses (36 credit hours), including at least five courses open only to graduate students, of which three must be at the 6000 level, with an overall minimum GPA of 3.0. A student must complete any prerequisite courses and all required courses, and the M.P.A. experiential learning requirement. The department of political science and public ad-ministration will grant credit toward the M.P.A. degree for certain courses taken in the College of Law, as detailed below.

Course Requirements

College of Law Credit for Certain Political Science Courses in the J.D./M.P.A. Program: Under the J.D./M.P.A. program, up to 12 semester credit hours of approved graduate M.P.A. courses may be applied toward the completion of the total credit hours required for the J.D. The student must earn a grade of B (3.0) or better in an M.P.A. course for the course to be credited toward the J.D.

The 12 hours of approved M.P.A. courses are as follows:

PSC 5430   Public Personnel Administration ............................................ 3

PSC 5470   Public Organization Theory ................................................... 3

PSC 6420   Quantitative Methods in Decision Making ............................. 3

PSC 6430   Public Policy Analysis ........................................................... 3

On written application by the student, and for good cause shown, the associate dean of the College of Law may substitute another graduate PSC course for one on the approved list.

Political Science Credit for Certain College of Law Courses in the J.D./M.P.A. Program: Under the J.D./M.P.A. program, up to 12 semester credit hours of approved upper-level courses in the College of Law may be applied toward the completion of the 36 credit hours required for the M.P.A. degree. In College of Law graded courses, the student must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better; and in College of Law ungraded courses, the student must earn a Pass or better for the course to be granted credit toward the M.P.A. degree.

Scheduling: A full-time student entering the College of Law must enroll full time exclusively in the College of Law beginning in the fall, for the first academic year. A part-time student entering the College of Law must enroll exclusively in the College of Law beginning in the fall of the first year, for two academic years.

After the initial first year or two years (as the case may be) in the College of Law, a student in the J.D./M.P.A. program is required to maintain his or her status as a student in the College of Law by taking at least one course for credit in the college during each academic year until the course requirements for the J.D. are completed.

Department of Psychology

J. D. Jasper, Chair
R
ickye S. Heffner, Associate Chair
Andrew L. Geers, Experimental Area Coordinator
Laura D. Seligman, Director of Clinical Training

Requirements for the Master’s Program

Students enrolled in the doctoral program earn the M.A. degree in partial fulfillment of requirements for the Ph.D. degree.

A minimum of 35 semester hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required. Each student must complete specific course requirements and must complete a master’s thesis. Although the program is designed to provide broad training in general psychology, it is expected that the thesis will be conducted within one of the following domains: clinical psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, psychobiology and learning, or social psychology.

Requirements for the Doctoral Program

Applicants must satisfy admission requirements of the Graduate School, the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences, and the department. Each applicant must submit an application, transcripts of previous academic work, three letters of recommendation, and GRE scores (including the advanced psychology test).

A minimum of 92 semester hours of course work is required in the Ph.D. program in psychology, 47 hours of core requirements, and a minimum of 45 hours in one of two areas of concentration – experimental or clinical psychology. Training in clinical psychology, which is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association, provides students with a broad educational foundation in the science and the practice of clinical psychology. Training in experimental psychology allows students to focus on various aspects of cognitive psychology and language, developmental psychology, psychobiology and learning, and social psychology.

The purpose of the doctoral program is to prepare students for careers in academia (teaching, research, clinical work), in mental health programs, in clinical intervention settings, as well as in other settings. Doctoral training emphasizes the inculcation of scientific attitudes with regard to the gathering and evaluation of information; the solving of basic and applied research problems; and clinical assessment and psychotherapy. Each student must complete specific course requirements, a master’s thesis, doctoral examinations, and a doctoral dissertation. An individual plan of study is developed by the student in consultation with the academic adviser and advisory committee.

Applicants must satisfy admission requirements of the Graduate School and the department. Each applicant must submit an application, transcripts of previous academic work, three letters of recommendation, and GRE scores (including the advanced psychology test). A brief biographical sketch also is required from each applicant.

Spatially Integrated Social Science (SISS)

Peter S. Lindquist, Director

The Spatially Integrated Social Science (SISS) Ph.D. Program is a multidisciplinary degree program offered jointly by a consortium of academic departments in the College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences that include Geography and Planning, Economics, Political Science and Public Administration, and Sociology and Anthropology. This program is designed around the application of geographic information science, spatial statistics, spatial econometrics and spatial analysis to study the spatial dimension of human and social dynamics, including interaction of individuals and society, government, and market participants.

Students entering this program must have completed a master’s degree, preferably in a Social Science discipline. In addition, all students admitted into the program must have completed two courses covering geographic information systems and one course in multivariate statistics. New graduate students who are deficient in these requirements must complete prerequisites prior to entering the program. All students seeking admission are required to provide transcripts, GRE scores, three academic letters of recommendation, and a statement of purpose. All students applying from universities outside of the U.S. are also required to submit TOEFL scores. Completion of the Ph.D. takes up to four years of study beyond the master’s degree. The doctoral degree requires 60 semester hours beyond the Master’s Degree with 36 course credits and 24 dissertation credits.

Requirements for the Ph.D.

Course Work. The doctoral degree requires 60 semester hours beyond the Master’s Degree with 36 course credits and 24 dissertation credits. 18 credits (six courses) are mandatory core courses (SISS 7010, 7020, 8010, 8020, 8030, 8040). Two advanced seminar courses (6 credits) selected from SISS 7030, 8150, 8160, 8170, 8180, 8190, 8200, 8210). Two elective courses (6 credits) selected within one of the allied social science departments participating in the program: Geography and Planning, Economics, Political Science and Public Administration, or Sociology and Anthropology. Two additional courses (6 credits) from advanced seminar courses or electives. All courses must be approved by the program director or dissertation advisor. Enrollment for dissertation credit is reserved for the third and fourth years of the program after course work has been completed and the qualifying exam has been passed. Students are eligible to take a minimum of six credits of dissertation in a semester.

Comprehensive Examination. A comprehensive examination will be scheduled for the summer following the end of the first year of the graduate program and will cover material presented in the first five core courses of the program.   To qualify, a student must have a "B" or better in all five core courses. Upon successful completion of the examination, the student can begin taking the advanced seminars and electives in the second year of residence.

Dissertation. Each student must complete 24 credit hours of dissertation. In the Spring Semester of the second year of residence, students can begin to establish a Dissertation Advisory Committee. Students will also enroll in the final core course (SISS 8040:   Research Design). It is during this time that the student should begin to focus on establishing a dissertation topic. A Qualifying Exam will be administered at the beginning of the Fall Semester of the student's third year. The Qualifying Exam will test each student on the basis of their knowledge and skills in the area(s) of their dissertation topic. Upon completion of the qualifying exam, students will prepare a dissertation proposal and defend it by end of semester. Upon successful completion of the defense, each student will work on their dissertation for the remainder of Year 3 and up to Year 4.

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Rubin Patterson, Chair
Eli
as T. Nigem, Graduate Director, Adviser

Requirements for the Master’s Program

Regular admission to the master of arts and master of arts and education degree programs in sociology requires meeting the admission requirements of the Graduate School, including presentation of scores on the aptitude sections of the GRE.

The master of arts in sociology requires a minimum of 37 credit hours of study. These hours are made up of required courses in theory, methods, and statistics (see B below); elective course work (see C below); and completion of a thesis, an internship or additional course work (see D below).

 

The program requirements are:

 

A.   Required background courses (0-9 hours)

(For students who have not completed these or equivalent undergraduate courses):

SOC 5040 Classical Theory ............................................................... 3

SOC 5270 Social Research Methods .................................................. 3

SOC 5290 Social Research Statistics ................................................... 3

 

B.   Core courses required of all students (10 hours)

SOC 6000 Introduction to Graduate Studies in Sociology ..................... 1

SOC 6040 Advanced Sociological Theory or

SOC 6050 Advanced Social Theory & Political Economy ................... 3

SOC 6270 Advanced Social Research Methods .................................. 3

SOC 6290 Advanced Social Research Statistics................................... 3

 

C.   Program electives (21 hours): These may be completed by choosing from 5000- and 6000-level courses offered in sociology. Students must take a minimum of two of these courses at the 6000 level.

Students in the M.A. degree program may choose to use their elective hours to focus on a substantive area of the discipline. The faculty offers four areas of concentration – health and medicine; class, race and gender; law and society; and social change/ globalization.

D.   Thesis/Internship/Course Work: Students may choose to complete a thesis (six hours), an internship (six hours) or six additional hours of course work with adviser approval. Organized and presented in a fashion consistent with Graduate School guidelines, the master’s thesis is an original piece of research developed in collaboration with a full-time member of the departmental faculty who serves as thesis committee chair. Two additional full- time faculty members (at least one of whom is a member of the departmental faculty) may also serve as advisers to the student and are members of the thesis committee. Students should enroll in SOC 6960 for thesis credit; these hours will be graded on a S/NC basis.

Students selecting the internship must develop this option in concert with two members of the full-time faculty, one of whom will serve as chair. A third member of the committee will come from the field in which the internship is located. Examples of internship settings include community organizations, health facilities, criminal justice facilities and government offices. Internships must place students in a position to make sociological observations about the setting. These observations will be the basis for an internship report to be filed with the graduate adviser, after approval by the internship committee. Students should enroll in SOC 6940 to receive credit for the internship; these hours will be graded on a S/NC basis.

E.   Independent Research: Generally, students may take no more than three hours of independent study or research (5990, 6900, 6990) to complete their degree requirements. Exceptions may be approved by the graduate adviser to a maximum of six hours.

Typically, students may apply no more than three hours taken outside the department toward completion of the degree requirements. Exceptions may be approved by the graduate adviser.

Students should consult with the graduate adviser for additional information about program requirements and options.

Last Updated: 3/23/15