Judith Herb College of Education

/education/depts/efl/

Welcome

/education/

Follow Us





Contact Us

Department of Educational Foundations & Leadership
The University of Toledo
Main Campus
Gillham Hall, 5th floor
mapGoogle maps
carGuest parking 

 

Mailing address:
The University of Toledo
Main Campus
MS 921
Toledo, OH 43606-3390

Department Secretary:
Ruth Ann Easterwood
Gillham Hall Room 5000
419.530.2461
ruthann.easterwood@
utoledo.edu

Staff Webpage


Interim Chair
Dr. Gregory Stone
Gillham Hall Room 5400-M
gregory.stone@utoledo.edu

Department of Educational Foundations & Leadership

Nancy Staub

Nancy Staub Dr. Nancy Staub
Assistant Professor
Educational Administration and Supervision Program
Department of Educational Foundations & Leadership

 

Gillham Hall 4000-N 
2801 West Bancroft St., Mail Stop 921
Toledo, OH 43606
Phone: 419.530.2145
nancy.staub@utoledo.edu

 

 

Dr. Nancy Staub currently serves as assistant professor in the Educational Administration and Supervision Program at The University of Toledo. She brings 26 years of Pre K -12 administrative experience to the position. Much of her work is focused on the development of principals through the use of technology and performance-based assignments.

Dr. Staub earned her Bachelor of Science Degree in Early Childhood and Elementary Education at Central Michigan University (1978), a Master of Science Degree (1982) from the Eastern Michigan University in Educational Leadership and a Doctorate of Education (1994) in Educational Foundations, Policy, and Administration at The University of Michigan.

 

 

Teaching Philosophy
_______________________________________

The Educational Administration and Supervision program prepares graduate students to become school principals. Our role as professors is to facilitate students’ understanding of the theoretical knowledge that shapes the practices necessary for leadership. In the process students must also recognize their own dispositions that fit into leadership practices and the specific leadership areas for personal growth. My courses are designed, with this focus in mind, to integrate four major components: theory; standards; principles of learning; and performance-based assessment.

Theoretical frameworks provide the foundation that students can return to when needed. By understanding the theory behind leadership models, personnel structures, supervision frameworks, etc., students recognize the bigger picture and thus, learn to make connections to all of the pieces before acting. I present theory to the students in this way by providing them with case studies and personal examples from my own years as an educational leader in order to facilitate their understandings and expand their perspectives.

The selection of theoretical models is informed by the standards--the Ohio Principal Standards and the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC). The ISLLC standards are developed in collaboration with the National Policy Board on Educational Administration. Both sets of standards reflect a strong research base with an eye on school reform and contemporary schools. Objectives for my courses are based on these standards to guide my selection of materials and design of lessons.

A significant component to my teaching philosophy is a set of principles for learning grounded in theory (Newman, F. & Wehlage, G., 1993). The four principles I consider when designing lessons are relevancy to the learning, higher order thinking, substantive conversation, and performance assessment. In each of these areas I look for technology solutions that will aid in my ability to achieve the course objectives. Relevancy to learning allows students to make the connections about what is being learned to what it looks like in a school environment. This is accomplished by modeling for students the actual practice, e.g. I take the role of principal and lead the students as faculty members through the process to create a vision statement for our fictitious school. Case studies and simulations also assist with the connection between what is being learned and practices in schools. Decision-making simulations have become the focus of my research work. These simulations are integrated into my courses in order to provide students an almost realistic situation where they have to select from different options to solve a problem and then learn the consequences of their decision as it would play out in a school setting. Additional online components are integrated into my courses. In The Administrative Experience: Improving schools I use the Ohio Leadership Advisory Council Modules OLAC). The OLAC modules align well with the course outcomes and the school improvement process used in Ohio. In this case students learn about how to improve schools while at the same time, learn what is specific to Ohio where the majority of students will apply for licensure. In the course Leading Systems Change I access an online software program entitled ETIPS—Educational Theory into Practice Software. This program allows me to design the elements of a school that students are then expected to investigate, make assumptions about the data they uncover, and then take action as an administrator.

Higher order thinking (Bloom, 1956) ensures that the learning graduate students are doing in the course occurs at a much higher level. Students are expected to analyze what they are learning in relationship to other models. Many of these models are structures within their own school districts but other times, it is the analysis of information or data to achieve deeper understanding. Many of the course assessments I design require students to develop a new way of solve a problem or create a model of school structure that has not been presented before in their current district.

Students learn from each other, the instructor, guest speakers, and interviewees. Participation is expected in my classes so that students have the opportunity to talk with other people, reflect on their learning, and articulate their thoughts. I achieve this not only from class discussions but assignments where students are required to interview someone in the field of education. An example of this is expecting students to interview a parent advocate for special education. This assignment is intended to dispel a myth about parent advocates as a problem for school administration and instead, to establish a new pattern of a relationship with a parent advocate that is carried over into the student’s job as a principal.

Performance assessments allow students to demonstrate what they know and can do as a result of the course. My course assessments specifically address a leadership practice in the field that integrates the course content. In doing so, students are demonstrating that they can perform this skill as a principal. A rubric is associated with the performance assessments that provide specific objectives to be addressed in the assessment.

The final result of my thinking as an overall philosophy for teaching and learning is a strong connection to theory and practice where students are at the center of their learning.

[back to top]

 

  Educational Background
_______________________________________

2011

Professional Training: State of Ohio Principal Evaluation System

1994

Doctor of Education
in Educational Foundations, Policy, and Administration
The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Dissertation Title: Principals' Knowledge, Understandings, and Influence in the First Year of Teaching

1982

Master of Science
in Educational Leadership
Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI

1978

Bachelor of Science
Child Development and Elementary Education
Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI

[back to top]

 

 

  Scholarly Interests
_______________________________________

  • Pre K-12th grade Administration
  • Development of principals through the use of technology and performance-based assignments

[back to top]

 

 

  Publications
_______________________________________

Referred Publications

Staub, N. & Bravender, M. (2014).Principal candidates create decision-making simulations to prepare for the JOB, International Journal of Educational Leadership Preparation. National Council of Professors of Educational Administration, 9 (1).

Berry, J. & Staub, N. (2011). Technology pedagogy: Software tools for teaching and learning. AASA Journal of Scholarship & Practice, 8(1), 24-33.

Staub, N. (1995).Assignments for seminar in Galura, J., Howard, J., Waterhouse, D. & Ross, R., Eds. Praxis III. Voices in Dialogue, p. 45, OCSL Press, Ann Arbor, MI.

Referred Publications in Press

Staub, N. & Bravender, M. (In press, October 2014). The construction of simulations as an instructional activity for graduate students in an education leadership program. Leadership and Research in Education: The Journal of the OCPEA. Ohio Professors of Educational Administration.

 

Referred Book Chapter

 

Staub, N. (2014). How cultural competency led to meaningful change between a Maya Village and a Midwest School in the United States. In S. Harris & J. Mixon (Eds.), Building cultural community through global educational leadership (pp.228-240). Ypsilanti, MI: National Council of Professors of Educational Administration.

 

Simulations Published

Staub, N. (2011). Web based Budget Simulation, NexLearn. http://ilu.nexlearn.com/VerticalMarkets/BUDGETSIM/index.html

Conference Proceedings

 

Staub, N.A. & Bravender, M. (2014). Authoring Online Simulations: Will it Make Me a Better Principal?. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 (p. 2983). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

 

Invited, Non Peer-Reviewed Publications

Staub, N. (August, 2005). Finding function in formative assessment, Scholastic Administrator, (5) 1, pp. 17-18, 49.

Staub, N. (1996, 1997) Livingston County Press. Monthly Column in Education.

Manuscripts in Progress

Staub, N. (ND). How technology changes the way we teach. (In revision to submit to Kappa Pi Delta Record per editor’s recommendation.)

Staub, N. & Bravender M. (ND). A comparison of online simulation processes in educational leadership Courses.

Staub, N. & Pull, R. (ND). Influence of technology on instructional decision-making.

Alotabi, S. & Staub, N. (ND). Participation of women completing high school in an online learning environment.

Simulations in Progress

Student Disruption, Category: Special Education: http://goo.gl/Eyjy1i

Yellow Ribbons, Category: Crisis Management http://goo.gl/aqnktJ

Cell Phone, Category: Teacher Guidelines http://goo.gl/0gYrVo

Band Concert, Category: After School Activities http://goo.gl/P0GM5W 

Student Engagement, Category: Teacher Evaluation http://goo.gl/3hKoIT 

[back to top]

 

 

Software/Creative and Other Works
_______________________________________

Staub, N. (2011). Web based Budget Simulation, NexLearn. http://ilu.nexlearn.com/VerticalMarkets/BUDGETSIM/index.html 

Staub, N. (2005). Developed a teacher and principal exchange program that included professional development for Guatemalan teachers between a local school district and a village school in Santa Cruz La Laguna, Guatemala.

[back to top]

 

 

  Presentations
_______________________________________

Refereed Presentations

Bravender, M. & Staub, N. (2014). What would you do? Student experiences with online simulations." Proposal accepted for presentation at the Lilly Conference On Evidenced-Based Teaching and Learning, October 2014, Traverse City, MI.

Staub, N. & Bravender, M. (2014). Technology Innovation in Leadership Preparation -New Online Branching Simulations for Principals, Part 2. Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the National Council for Professors of Educational Administration, August 2014,CamarilloCA.

Staub, N. & Bravender, M. (2014). Engaging school leaders to validate novices’ decision-making as expressed in their simulations. Presented at the World Conference on Educational Media and Technology, June 2014, Tampere, Finland.

Staub, N. (2013). Cross cultural influences. Presented at the Annual Meeting for the National Association of Multicultural Education, November 2013, Oakland, CA.

Staub, N. & Bravender, M. (2014). Will it Make Me a Better Principal? Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, March 2014, Jacksonville, FL.

Staub, N. & Bravender, M. (2012). Technology innovation and leadership preparation. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the University Council of Educational Administration, November 2012, Denver, CO.

Staub, N. (2012). The influence of technology on instructional decision-making. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Council for Professors of Educational Administration, August 2012Kansas City, MO.

Staub, N. (2102). The influence of technology on instructional decision-making. Paper accepted for presentation at the World International Conference on Scientific Educational Research and Technology, April 2012, Ontario, Canada. Did not present.

Staub, N. (2011). The effects of a six-year teacher/principal exchange between a village in Guatemala and a Michigan school. Presented at the Annual Meeting for the National Council of Professors of Educational Administration, August 2011,Portland, OR.

Staub, N. & Beekley, C.(2012). Urban leadership development program: A partnership between The University of Toledo and the Toledo Public Schools. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the University Council of Educational Administration, November 2010, New Orleans, LA.

Berry, J. & Staub, N. (2010). Technology pedagogy: Software tools for teaching and learning. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Council for Professors of Educational Administration, August 2010, Washington, D.C.

Staub, N. & McCurdy, T. (2005) School improvement: How lesson and assessment database management can improve teacher effectiveness. Presented at the International Society for Technology in Education, June 2005, Washington, D.C.

Staub, N. & McCurdy, T. (2004). The use of a database management system in assessment practices. Presented at the International Society for Technology in Education, June 2004, New Orleans, LA.

Staub, N. (1993). Principals’ knowledge, understandings, and influence in the first year of teaching implications for teacher development and school administration- Presented at the Annual Meeting for the American Educational Research Association, April 1993, Atlanta, GA.

Staub, N. (1990).Principals’ knowledge, understandings, and influence in the first year of teaching. Presented at the Annual Meeting for the American Educational Research Association, April 1990, Chicago, IL.

Invited Presentations

Staub, N. (2014). The teaching of The Administrative Experience: Improving schools in a blended, online format. Advisory Council for The Urban Leadership Development Program, Toledo Public Schools, Toledo, OH.

Staub, N. (2013). The teaching of Individuals in Organizations in a blended, online format. Advisory Council for The Urban Leadership Development Program, Toledo Public Schools, Toledo, OH.

Staub, N. (2011). Technology pedagogy: Software tools for teaching and learning. The Judith Herb College of Education Colloquium, The University of Toledo, January 2011, Toledo, OH.

Staub, N., McCurdy, T. (2004) Database management and teacher effectiveness. Portsmouth, VA.

Staub, N. & McCurdy, T. (2005). Database management and teacher effectiveness, Orlando, FL.

Staub, N. McCurdy, T. (2005).  Making it real: Managing assessment data to document student achievement and to improve teacher effectiveness. San Francisco, CA.

Staub, N. (2005). Standards and assessment: The use of curriculum management systems, St. John’s, MI.

Staub, N. & McCurdy, T. (2005).  Lesson and assessment database management. New York City, NY.

Staub, N. (2005). The use of math manipulative materials in Guatemalan classrooms. Santa Cruz La Laguna. Guatemala.

[back to top]

 

 

  Vitae
_______________________________________

CV icon[PDF download]

[back to top]

 

Courses
_______________________________________

Leadership and Organizational Theory (EDAS 8600)
This seminar is intended to introduce students to emerging problems and issues in educational leadership and to help socialize students to their roles as active inquirers and seekers of new knowledge. Students will investigate the theoretical framework for different learning organizations and the keys to school leadership that maximize a leaders impact. Students will explore international models of teaching and learning to gain a global perspective of schooling that can be analyzed with the different frameworks of learning organizations.

The Individual in Organizations (EDAS 6000/8000)
This course is an introduction to the principal role and leadership theory. The curriculum for the course was revised in 2009 to align with ELCC standards. Distinction between the Master’s level (6000) and the Ed. Specialist/Doctoral level (8000) course was also completed at the time of the revision. Since then, the course has been developed into a blended, online format

The Administrative Experience (EDAS 6150/8150)
This course provides students with knowledge of the school improvement process and experiences collecting and using data in this process. The curriculum for the course was revised in 2009 to align with ELCC standards. Distinction between the Master’s level (6000) and the Ed. Specialist/Doctoral level (8000) course was also completed at the time of the revision. Since then, the course has been developed into a blended, online format. 

[back to top]

 

Grants
_______________________________________

Ohio Leadership for Inclusion, Implementation, & Instructional Improvement (OLI4):  Improving Results for Students with Disabilities and Learning Difficulties---Developing Principal Capacity, June 2014, $1000.

University of Research Awards and Fellowships-Simulation Development, Summer 2014.
The grant supported research and development of online simulations for use in graduate level leadership courses, $9,672.

Student Technology Grant- SimWriter Simplicity Software, March 2013.
The grant allowed for the purchase of ten software licenses in the computer lab to support graduate student work in the development of online simulations, $24,375.00.

Ohio Professors of Educational Administration (OCPEA), June 2013.
Review of grant proposals from the Education Service Agencies in Ohio for principal mentoring programs, $1500.

Dean’s Innovation Fund- Technology Pedagogy Project, October 2012.
The grant funded work in the area of technology and the use of film as a medium to convey a message, $1900.

Dean’s Innovation Fund- Simulation development for principal decision- making, January 2011.
The grant supported research and development of online simulations in graduate level leadership courses, $8,000.

Dean’s Innovation Fund- Pre- service principal project, January 2011
The pre-service principal project provides scholarship money to principal candidates to cover substitute teacher costs so that they may job shadow a school principal all day for one full week, $8,000.

[back to top]

 

 

Accreditation & Reporting
_______________________________________

2013            University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
Prepared reports for each of the four EDAS programs for the upcoming (2016) Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) visitation. This included the revision of performance assessments and rubrics aligned to the 2011 Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards; Collection, analysis, and reporting of the student data for courses selected for CAEP review.

2010           University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
Prepared reports for each of the four EDAS programs for the 2010 NCATE visit. This included the development of multiple performance assessments and rubrics aligned to the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards; Collection, analysis, and reporting of the student data for courses selected for NCATE review.

[back to top]

 

Last Updated: 6/26/15