Provost's Office

Languages, Literature and Social Sciences

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Academic Departments
Programs and Centers
Mission Statement
Admission Policies
Academic Policies
Degree Requirements
Student Selection and Admission Criteria
Undergraduate Programs of Study
College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Faculty

 


Academic Departments

Office of the Dean

Jamie Barlowe, Interim Dean
University Hall Room 3160 Phone: 419-530-2164
jamie.barlowe@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-2157

James Benjamin, Associate Dean
University Hall Room 3160 Phone: 419-530-5506
james.benjamin@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-2157


Student Services


Christine Habrecht, Assistant Dean and Director of Student Services
University Hall Room 3000 Phone: 419-530-2671
christine.habrecht@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-2507

 John Klear, Graduate and College Adviser
University Hall Room 3000 Phone 419-530-2671
john.klear@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-2507

Sharon Schnarre, Pre-med/pre-dent/pre-vet Adviser
University Hall Room 3000 Phone: 419-530-2671
sharon.schnarre@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-2507


Academic Departments


Department of Communication

Paul Fritz, Chair
University Hall Room 4630B Phone: 419-530-2006
paul.fritz@utoledo.edu Fax: 429-530-4771

Department of Economics

Michael Dowd, Chair
University Hall Room 4110C Phone: 419-530-2572
michael.dowd@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-7844

 Department of English

Sara Lundquist, Chair
Field House Room 1500J Phone: 419-530-2318
sara.lundquist@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4440

Department of Foreign Languages

Ruth Hottell, Chair
Field House Room 2400F Phone: 419-530-2606
ruth.hottell@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4954

Department of Geography and Planning

Patrick Lawrence, Chair
Snyder Memorial Hall Room 3061 Phone: 419-530-2545
patrick.lawrence@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-7919

Department of History

William J. O’Neal, Chair
Tucker Hall Room 1142 Phone 419-530-2845
william.oneal@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4539

Department of Philosophy

John Sarnecki, Chair
Scott Hall Room 1006 Phone: 419-530-4524
john.sarnecki@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-6189

Department of Political Science and Public Administration

Mark Denham, Chair
Snyder Memorial Hall Room 3006 Phone: 419-530-4151
mark.denham@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4199

Department of Psychology

 J.D. Jasper, Chair
University Hall Room 5614A Phone: 419-530-2717
jjasper@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-8479

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Rubin Patterson, Chair
University Hall Room 2520 Phone: 419-530-2791
rubin.patterson@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-8406

Department of Women’s and Gender Studies

 Charlene Gilbert, Chair
University Hall 4260A Phone: 419-530-2233
charlene.gilbert@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4411


Academic Programs and Centers


Africana Studies

Rubin Patterson, Director
University Hall Room 2370 Phone: 419-530-7253
rubin.patterson@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-8406

American Studies

James Campbell, Director
Scott Hall Room 1011 Phone: 419-530-6190
james.campbell@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-6189

Asian Studies

Gene Chang, Director
University Hall Room 5280 Phone: 419-530-6155
gene.chang@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-7844

 Disability Studies

James Ferris, Ability Center of Greater Toledo Endowed Chair
University Hall Room 2100 Phone: 419-530-7244
jim.ferris@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-7238

 European Studies

Mark Denham, Director
Snyder Memorial Hall Room 3006 Phone: 419-530-4151L
mark.denham@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4199

Humanities

Charles Blatz, Director
Sullivan Hall 2001 Phone: 419-530-2329
charles.blatz@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-6189

Global Studies

Mark Denham, Director
Snyder Memorial Hall Room 3006 Phone: 419-530-4151
mark.denham@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4199

Law and Social Thought

Renee Heberle, Co-Director
University Hall 2370 Phone: 419-530-7268
renee.heberle@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4739

Jerry Van Hoy, Co-Director
University Hall 2370 Phone 419-530-7268
jerry.vanhoy@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4739

Middle East Studies

Elias Nigem, Director
University Hall Room 2520 Phone: 419-530-4662
enigem@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-8406

Religious Studies

John Sarnecki
Scott Hall Room 1011 Phone: 419-530-6190
john.sarnecki@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-6189

Center for Religious Understanding

Jeanine Diller, Director
Scott Hall Room 1021 Phone: 419-530-6190
jeanine.diller@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-6189

Urban Studies

Carter Wilson, Director
Snyder Memorial Hall Room 3000 Phone: 419-530-4151
carter.wilson3@utoledo.edu Fax: 419-530-4199


Mission Statement


 

The College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences is dedicated to offering a rich and unified environment that is deftly responsive to change, student need, and higher education in the 21st century, to promoting the value of liberal education, to excelling in research in the liberal arts, humanities, social sciences, and interdisciplinary studies, and to outreach and engagement that serves the university, the global and local community, and the professions.


Admission Policies


 

New first-year students must (1) submit a college test score (ACT or SAT) and (2) have either a 2.5 high school GPA or ACT composite or 20 (SAT combined reading and math score of 950) to be admitted to the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences.  Applicants not meeting these standards will be admitted to the University of Toledo Learning Collaborative Gateway Program. 

To be considered for admission to the pre-med, pre-dent and pre-vet programs, students will need a minimum high school cumulative GPA of 3.2 and an ACT composite score of 25 (or minimum SAT combined reading and math score of 1150).  Students should also have successfully completed a minimum of three years of high school mathematics (algebra I, algebra II and geometry) and high school chemistry.  Applicants not meeting these standards but meeting the Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences college admission standards will be admitted to the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences degree program of their choice as BA (undecided) majors.

Change of College

Students in good standing (i.e., with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher) who wish to change from another college of The University of Toledo to the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences should make an appointment with a college Adviser in the College Student Services Office to discuss their transfer and have their academic records reviewed.  External transfer course work previously evaluated by other UT colleges will be re-evaluated.  All college requirements, including core, distributive, major and related requirements, must be fulfilled as specified in the catalog for the year in which the student enters the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences.  Credit restrictions and level requirements for College of Languages, Literature, and Social Science students will apply.  Continuing UT students seeking admission to pre-medical, pre-dental and pre-veterinary programs must have a 3.0 cumulative college GPA and have completed CHEM 1090 or 1230 and MATH 1320 or higher with a B or better. 

Admission with Transfer Credit from Another Institution

No more than 94 semester hours of credit earned at other institutions may apply toward a degree in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences. Course work from other institutions is accepted at the level at which the course was taught at that institution. Courses transferred from community, junior or technical colleges offering Associate degrees will not count toward the requirement of 32 credits at the 3000-4000 levels.  Students with transfer credit are generally expected to fulfill all University and college course requirements for a degree in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences as specified in the catalog for the year in which they enter the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences.  In some cases, not all the credits that transfer into The University of Toledo will apply toward a degree in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences, e.g., developmental courses and excess credits in the major and in technical subjects.  Transfers from other institutions shall take at least 30 semester hours at The University of Toledo, including 12 semester hours of work in their major field and 9 semester hours in their minor field, regardless of the number of hours transferred. 

Students transferring to the University of Toledo in Spring 2007 or later, including transfer readmits, must meet minimum GPA requirements in their Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences majors and minors with both (1) the grades of all courses attempted at UT and (2) in a second calculation, the grades of all courses attempted at all institutions (including UT).  The grades of all courses (from all institutions) which are used by those students to satisfy UT Core requirements must be used in the calculation of the UT Core GPA. 

UT students who attend other institutions as guests or transient students in Fall 2008 or later must also meet minimum GPA requirements in their Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences majors and minors with (1) the grades of all courses attempted at UT and (2) in a second calculation, the grades of all courses attempted at all institutions (including UT).  The grades of all courses (from all institutions) which are used by those students to satisfy UT Core requirements must be used in the calculation of the UT Core GPA. 

For the purposes of meeting minimum cumulative GPAs in a student's VPA major(s) and/or minor(s) and the UT Core, the grades of all courses attempted at all institutions will be included in the GPA calculation(s).  Note:  Due to technological limitations of UT's current Degree Audit Reporting System, Degree Audit GPA calculations for students who have taken courses at other institutions may not be accurate.  Consult a college staff Adviser if you have questions. 

Transfer students should note that The University of Toledo will include all course work taken at all institutions of higher education in the calculation to determine if a student will graduate with honors.  All college course work ever taken is computed in determining eligibility for graduation with honors, although no student will be awarded a level of honors above that indicated by The University of Toledo cumulative grade point average (GPA).  Note:  The University of Toledo requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of standard letter graded courses from UT in order to qualify for graduation with honors. 

An applicant who has undertaken courses at a regionally accredited college or university and who submits through the Office of Undergraduate Admission for Adult, Transfer and International Students an official transcript listing courses and grades and giving evidence of good standing will be admitted to the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences, provided the student has maintained a minimum GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

Exceptions to this minimum admission requirement are rarely made and require the applicant to demonstrate, in a written petition to the committee on academic standing, that there are special circumstances that warrant waiver of the requirement. Approval of the petition is not automatic, and those students who are admitted by petition will be placed on special probationary status and must meet certain conditions to remain enrolled. 

If the college from which the applicant transfers lacks proper accreditation, the student may be denied transfer credit on the basis of the transcript, but may be allowed to obtain credit by passing advanced standing examinations with at least a C grade.  Official transcripts of records from all schools previously attended must be on file with the Office of Undergraduate Admission for Adult, Transfer and International Students before the student will be permitted to register.

A Second Degree at The University of Toledo

A student earning a first degree at The University of Toledo may earn a second bachelor’s degree in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences by taking a minimum of 20 additional semester hours and satisfying all requirements for both degrees. The student must take the additional 20 hours in College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences course work, unless the student’s major department requires course work outside the college to satisfy major or related requirements.  An undergraduate with a degree from another institution is considered a transfer student. Such a student is then considered a candidate for a second degree. See requirements for admission with transfer credit from another institution.

Requirements for Students with an Associate’s Degree

Students holding an Associate of arts or Associate of science degree from an accredited college are encouraged to enroll in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences and, in many instances, may expect to earn an appropriate baccalaureate upon completion of two years of full-time study. Students with an Associate’s degree in a technical program will likely require more time to complete a bachelor’s degree. The following regulations apply:


• Students must complete the equivalent of the specified University and college core and distributive requirements for a bachelor’s degree.


• In all baccalaureate programs, a minimum of 64 hours must be taken at the 2000 to 4000 levels; of these, a minimum of 32 hours must be taken at the 3000 to 4000 levels in baccalaureate degree - granting colleges. Course work from other institutions is accepted at the level at which the course was taught at that institution.


• Students may enroll in any departmental, interdepartmental or interdisciplinary program for which they meet the admission criteria. All of the usual major and related area requirements must be fulfilled as specified in the catalog for the year in which the student entered the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences.


• For students with an Associate’s degree in a technical program, no more than six additional hours of credit outside the college may apply toward graduation. 

Readmission of Former Arts and Sciences or College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Students

Students who have withdrawn from the former College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences and The University of Toledo and have not attended any other institution in the Interim may be readmitted, provided they were eligible to continue enrollment in the college at the time they discontinued attendance. Such students should readmit at the College Student Services Office. Students who have been suspended from the former College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences must submit a written letter of petition. Students who readmit after more than 12 consecutive months’ absence must comply with existing college requirements at the time of readmission.


Academic Policies



Refer to UT Policy website for academic policies that apply to all students.

Academic Advising

Academic advising is a process intended to help students derive as many benefits as possible from their educations. This occurs when Advisers help students develop and reach academic and career goals. While the ultimate responsibility for making personal and educational decisions rests with the student, Advisers assist by helping to identify and assess alternatives and the consequences of decisions. Advising can be much more than selecting courses. The more frequently students arrange to meet with their Advisers, the better their needs can be served.  New students, transfer students, students changing colleges, and continuing general studies students are advised in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Student Services Office, University Hall Room 3000, by college staff Advisers. They provide essential information; help students select courses to meet University core and college distributive requirements; suggest courses for the exploration of majors and minors; and help students evaluate academic progress and adjustment to university life. Students with declared majors and/or minors are advised by departmental major or program Advisers, faculty who provide general information as well as more specialized information about majors and minor programs, departmental course offerings, and career and graduate opportunities. They help students select courses for general, major, related, and other requirements. Students in the Honors College and those seeking more than one major or degree, a minor, or admission to professional school should meet periodically with one or more additional Advisers.  A complete list of academic Advisers is available on the College website or in the College office.

Student Responsibilities

Students are responsible for correctly selecting courses for their programs of study each semester and for fulfilling all degree requirements. Although Advisers will assist wherever possible, the final responsibility rests with the student. Students are expected to make sure that they are fulfilling all degree requirements, as published in the issue of the catalog of the former College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences under which they entered. Students who have been out of the former College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences for 12 consecutive months are responsible for the requirements in the University catalog under which they reenter.

Transcripts and Degree Audit Reports

A transcript is a complete chronological list of a student’s academic course work (including all courses attempted and grades earned).  It does not show how specific courses apply or do not apply to University and college requirements as stipulated in this catalog.  For example, developmental, excess technical, non-repeatable and certain other courses are not counted toward minimum credits for degrees, but appear on transcripts. 

The Degree Audit Report (DAR) details all requirements applicable to a student’s academic program (degree, major, minor) and applies the student’s courses on the transcript (including transfer credit) to those requirements. The DAR should be used to identify requirements remaining when all registered courses are completed.  The College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Student Services Office (UH Room 3000) will provide an unofficial transcript and DAR to a College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences student presenting a picture ID.  Students also may view their transcript and DAR through the myUT portal with Student Self-Service.

Declaring or Changing a Major or Minor

To declare a major or minor or change one previously declared, students must fill out a form that is available in the College Student Services Office.

Sequence of Courses

There is no single prescribed sequence of courses, except that all first-year students should take ARS 1000 Orientation, College Composition I and II, and any developmental courses required on the basis of placement testing and/or high school deficiencies. Students should consult the later sections of the catalog devoted to programs of study and course offerings, and they should review their programs with their academic Advisers to ensure they complete courses in the proper sequences. In addition, students should use their Degree Audit Reports to track their progress.

Students majoring in the areas of humanities and social sciences are expected to defer most of their major work until the junior and senior years, except for courses prerequisite to the 3000 level and 4000 level courses in their fields. Outside the major, during the first two years, they should be sure to take those courses in the general requirements that are prerequisite to courses they wish to take as juniors and seniors.

Study Abroad

Students who plan to study abroad must be sure that their proposed course of study is properly accredited. Its academic acceptability should be verified by the college before departure. Students also should ascertain in advance from their Advisers whether the course work will count toward their general requirements, majors, or related areas or only be regarded as elective. Credit for foreign language study is subject to the approval and recommendation of the department of foreign languages.

Information about study abroad programs is generally available from Advisers in many college programs and departments and from the Office of Study Abroad.

Transient (Guest) Enrollment at Another Institution

College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences students must have advance permission both to enroll elsewhere as a guest and to take specific courses.  The Transient Student form for this purpose is available in the College Student Services Office and on the college website.  Students enrolling without permission will be considered transfer readmits upon their return to UT.  LLSS students enrolled as transients or guests at another institution must submit an official transcript to the UT Office of Admission at the conclusion of the enrolled term.  Grades of all courses attempted in the major, minor, and UT Core will be used in cumulative GPA calculations.

GPA Recalculation for Repeated Courses

The College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences permits a maximum of 12 semester hours or the equivalent of 18 quarter hours of course work to be deleted from the GPA calculation. Students who have had their GPAs recomputed under the Academic Forgiveness Policy are not eligible for grade deletions.
Criteria governing GPA recalculation are given in the General Section of this catalog. Students should check with the College Student Services Office for more specific information on this policy.  Students may not use repeat courses taken at other institutions to qualify for a GPA recalculation.

Withdrawal Policy (W, IW, DR Grades)

The number of credit hours of W, IW and DR is limited to 22 hours for all undergraduate students in degree programs in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences. Once a student has accumulated 22 hours of W, IW or DR, further withdrawals will be counted as F’s in computation of the student’s GPA for purposes of probation or suspension. In addition, students who receive financial aid risk the loss of financial aid if they accumulate excessive hours of W, IW and DR.

Students who transfer into the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences from another college at The University of Toledo will bring with them the number of W’s, IW’s and DR’s accumulated in their previous work.

Note:  Assignment of the IW and DR grades has been discontinued.  A student wanting to be withdrawn from a course must file a petition in the Records Office by the deadline in the term of enrollment.

Academic Probation

A student whose cumulative GPA is less than 2.0 is automatically placed on probation until a 2.0 cumulative GPA is achieved (See Withdrawal Policy above). It is recommended that a student on probation not enroll for more than 12 to 14 credits.

Academic Suspension

Academic suspension means that a student is prohibited from registering at The University of Toledo for a period of at least one semester. Students are subject to academic suspension if their GPA falls below the minimum GPA listed below or if they fail to make sufficient progress toward attainment of the degree. (See Withdrawal Policy). Students may remove Incompletes while under suspension.
A student is subject to academic suspension if the cumulative GPA is less than:
1.0 for 10 to 19 hours attempted 
1.5 for 20 to 29 hours attempted
1.7 for 30 to 39 hours attempted 
1.8 for 40 to 49 hours attempted 
1.9 for 50 to 59 hours attempted
2.0 for 60 or more hours attempted
After accumulating 60 credit hours without suspension, a student may be suspended if the cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 for two consecutive semesters.

Trial Readmission Policy

After the required suspension period, a student may petition for readmission to the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences committee on academic standing. The petition must be received at least one month before the beginning of the semester in which the student wishes to readmit. If the petition is accepted, the college committee will determine the terms of the conditional registration agreement, under which the student will be permitted to re-enroll. Suspended students who are granted readmission must maintain the designated GPA for each semester thereafter and meet the conditions of their readmission agreement. Students failing to meet these conditions are subject to a one-year suspension.

Dismissal Policy

Students who fail to meet the conditions for readmission after their second suspension are subject to dismissal and are not eligible for readmission to the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences for at least three years. Refer to the General Section of this catalog for information on the Academic Forgiveness Policy.

 Academic Grievance

 A student has the responsibility and right to call to the attention of an instructor any grade that the student believes to be in error or unfair. A student may appeal the decision of the instructor, in order, to the department Chair, the Dean, then to the college appeals committee if the problem is not resolved. If the problem is not resolved at the college level, the student may appeal to the student grievance council (See also The University of Toledo Student Handbook). A student must begin the appeals process no later than the end of the semester following the one in which the grievance arose.

 Statement on Academic Dishonesty

 A student found to be academically dishonest by a faculty member may appeal, in order, to the department Chair, the Dean, the college appeals committee and the University student grievance council. The procedures for making an appeal to the student grievance council may be found in The University of Toledo Student Handbook. Refer to the General Section of this catalog for the policy statement on academic dishonesty.

 College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

 The College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences will accept a maximum of 21 semester hours of CLEP through successful completion of the four general examinations. Additional credit may be earned through satisfactory scores on individual subject examinations. Required minimum scores and credits awarded are as follows:

General Examinations

  •  Humanities: For a score of 50, a student will receive six hours credit for College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences distributive requirements in the humanities.
  •  College mathematics: For a score of 65, a student will receive three hours credit for MATH 1180.
  •  Natural sciences: For a score of 50, a student will receive six hours credit for College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences distributive requirements in the natural sciences.
  •  Social sciences and history: For a score of 50, a student will receive six hours credit for College of Languages, Literature, and Sciences distributive requirements in the social sciences.

 Subject Examinations

  •  American government: For a score of 50, a student will receive three hours credit for PSC 1200.
  •  Biology: For a score of 50, a student will receive three hours credit for BIOL 1120.
  • Calculus: For a score of 65, a student will receive four hours credit for MATH 1850.
  • Chemistry: For a score of 50, a student will receive eight hours credit for CHEM 1230 and CHEM 1240.
  • College algebra: For a score of 65, a student will receive three hours credit for MATH 1320.
  • French language: For a score of 50, a student will receive four hours credit for FREN 1500. For a score of 62, a student will receive seven hours credit for FREN 1500 and FREN 2140.
  • German language: For a score of 50, a student will receive four hours credit for GERM 1500. For a score of 62, a student will receive seven hours credit for GERM 1500 and GERM 2140.
  • Human growth and development: For a score of 50, a student will receive three hours of credit for PSY 2510.
  • Introductory psychology: For a score of 50, a student will receive three hours of credit for PSY 1010.
  • Introductory Sociology:  For a score of 50, a student will receive three hours credit for SOC 1010.
  • Pre-calculus:  For a score of 65, a student will receive four hours of credit for MATH 1340.
  • Principles of macroeconomics: For a score of 50, a student will receive three hours credit for ECON 1150.
  • Principles of microeconomics: For a score of 50, a student will receive three hours credit for ECON 1200.
  • Spanish language: For a score of 50, a student will receive four hours credit for SPAN 1500. For a score of 66, a student will receive seven hours of credit for SPAN 1500 and SPAN 2140.

Advanced Placement Program

 Refer to the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences programs of study section for specific information on minimum scores and credits awarded for Advanced Placement examinations administered by the College Board Advanced Placement Program.

Pass/No Credit Option

Refer to the General Section of this catalog for an explanation of the pass/no credit grading option. Refer to programs of study in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences section of this catalog for the limitations on pass/no credit grading in effect for different majors. Undecided students, as a general rule, should not elect pass/no credit grading in major-level courses.

Graduation Evaluation Requirements

Two or three semesters before a student intends to graduate, the student and the student’s major Adviser must complete a Graduation Progress Evaluation. This process is initiated by the student.  Students with more than one major or one or more minors must be evaluated for the completion of each major and minor. Detailed instructions on the Graduation Progress Evaluation and graduation procedures are available at the college office.

Field Experience/Internship

Policies and procedures for incorporating field experiences or internships in academic programs vary from major to major. Some majors require a field experience or internship; for other majors, they are optional. Students should seek information from their major departments and obtain advance approval for all field experiences or internships.


Degree Requirements


 

A. Grade Point Averages

 A cumulative grade point average (GPA) reflects all grades earned, including grades of F and grades in repeated courses.  Candidates must earn a minimum overall cumulative GPA of C (that is, a 2.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale) for all UT course work.  In addition, candidates must earn a minimum cumulative GPA of C in the major, minor (optional) and UT core, with the grades of all courses attempted at all institutions included in the GPA calculation.  Some programs require a higher GPA in the major. Refer to the General Section of this catalog for information on grade deletions and academic forgiveness.

B. Residency Requirement

Students transferring from other institutions must earn at least 30 hours of credit at The University of Toledo; at least 12 of these must be in the major area, and for students pursuing a minor, at least 9 hours must be earned at The University of Toledo. Full-time students must take their last semester, and part-time students their last 12 hours, in residence, unless alternative arrangements have been made in advance with the Dean of the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences.

C. Credit Hours and Levels

1.  Students must complete a minimum of 124 hours of course work that must include the University and college core and distributive requirements, and either an area of concentration (major) and course work related to the major, or an interdisciplinary program.


2.   In all baccalaureate programs, a minimum of 64 hours must be taken at the 2000 to 4000 levels; of these a minimum of 32 hours must be taken at the 3000 to 4000 levels.  (Courses transferred from community, junior or technical colleges offering Associate degrees will not count toward the 3000-4000 level requirement.)


3.   Students are cautioned to make use of their degree audit and review remaining requirements with their Adviser before every registration in order to make progress toward completion of their requirements in an orderly, timely manner.


4.   Insofar as a student can complete the basic courses and the courses required for a chosen major (as outlined in sections E - K below) in fewer than the 124 hours required for a degree, the student must choose elective courses to complete the total of 124 hours, subject to the restrictions outlined below.

D. Credit Restrictions

Total earned hours shown on a student’s transcript may not all be applicable to the minimum 124 credits required for a degree, as follows:


1.   Students with entrance deficiencies in mathematics and other students who are required or choose to take developmental course work will need to complete additional hours.


2.   No more than four hours of credit in performing ensembles (MUS 2010/3010 - 2190/3190) will apply toward the degree.


3.   No courses in typing, shorthand or keyboarding will apply toward the degree.


4.   No more than two hours in skill courses in physical education or recreation courses at the 1000 level will apply toward the degree.


5.   No more than two hours in Student Leadership Development I and II will apply toward the degree.


6.   Restriction on technical electives – no more than 15 hours of credit earned in colleges other than the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences, either at The University of Toledo or elsewhere, will apply toward the degree. Exceptions to this restriction may be approved by the student’s department in cases where technical courses are determined by departments to satisfy related requirements. In addition, College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences students taking a business minor will be permitted to take 21 hours of business courses. However, no additional technical electives beyond these 21 hours will apply to the degree.


7.   Duplicate credit – except for courses identified as repeatable courses, students will not receive credit for repeated courses (taking the same course twice), whether taken at The University of Toledo or elsewhere.


8.   The college reserves the right to deny credit for other specific courses (including most SKLS courses) and for blanket technical credit not applicable to a student’s specific progra

E. University Core Curriculum Requirements

Students earning baccalaureates in all colleges and programs are required to complete between 27 and 30 credit hours of courses that comprise the University Core Curriculum. Those courses are distributed in the areas of English composition, humanities/fine arts, social sciences, natural sciences and mathematics, and multicultural studies (see the General Section of this catalog for details). Some colleges and programs require courses in these areas above those required to fulfill University Core requirements. Students should contact their academic department or college office for specific details.

F. Orientation (ARS 1000) – 1 hour

All new first-year students are required to take ARS 1000. The course is optional for transfer students.

G. Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Skill Areas Requirements

Students are placed into English composition and mathematics courses by ACT scores or placement tests in those subjects. Students are placed into foreign language courses through placement testing.


1.   English Composition (University of Toledo core and College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences requirement) – 6 hours. Students must pass Composition I (or Composition I with Workshop, see below) and Composition II with a grade of C or better.


a.      Native speakers track (for students for whom English is a first 
language).
     

ENGL 1100 – 5 hours

Composition I with Workshop (Developmental course; three 
hours will count toward degree if student earns a grade of C or 
higher; any student who earns a grade of C or higher will go 
directly to Composition II; any student who does not pass will 
go to Composition I.)
     

ENGL 1110 – 3 hours

College Composition I      

ENGL 1130 (or 1140 or 1150) – 3 hours

College Composition II


b. Nonnative speakers track (for students for whom English is a 
second language) Students will take an English placement test 
to determine appropriate level.
     

ENGL 1020 – 3 hours

Writing and Grammar for English as a Second Language 


ENGL 1110 – 3 hours

Composition I


ENGL 1120 – 2 hours

Composition I Lab for ESL (corequisite to ENGL 1110) 


ENGL 1130 (or 1140 or 1150) – 3 hours

Composition II (A maximum of three hours of ENGL 1020 and ENGL 1120 will count toward the degree.)


2.   Mathematics 1180 (UT core and College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences requirement) – 3 hours (may replace with any mathematics course greater than MATH 1180, except MATH 2280).


3.   Foreign Languages (College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences requirement) – 0 to 14 hours (foreign languages 1110, 1120, 1500, 2140, 2150). Every student is required to demonstrate proficiency in a single foreign language (Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin or Spanish) through the intermediate (foreign languages 2150) level by successfully completing a foreign language course at this level or by achieving an appropriate score on a proficiency/placement test administered by the department of foreign languages that reflects the equivalent.

 Students beginning a foreign language should enroll in their chosen language at the elementary 1110 level and will take four semesters of foreign language. Those continuing a foreign language or attempting to demonstrate competency by examination should take a proficiency/placement test. Students with two or more years of French, German or Spanish in high school who place below an intermediate course may enroll in an intensive review course (foreign languages 1500) that covers the material in the first two semesters (foreign languages 1110 and 1120), and then complete the second-year courses (foreign languages 2140 and 2150).

H. Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Distributive Requirements

Students should consult with their Advisers in selecting courses that will meet distributive requirements. With their Adviser’s approval, students may select higher-level courses for which they have the prerequisites. With careful planning, students will be able to satisfy UT Core Curriculum and College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences requirements by taking the minimum required hours. A student may take no more than two courses (or two courses and one lab for natural sciences) under each departmental code in satisfying the general education distributive requirements.


1. Humanities and Fine Arts (UT core requirement is two courses 
for six hours; College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences requires nine to 15 
hours, depending on student’s major).

Students not majoring in the humanities or fine arts will take five courses (15 hours) in the humanities in addition to those taken to meet the English composition and foreign language requirements. Students majoring in the humanities or fine arts will be required to complete one history course, one literature course and one fine arts course. Students may select humanities courses that also will satisfy a UT core humanities or multicultural requirement.



Required Courses (for all majors) – 9 hours (see suggested courses listed below):


English Literature – 3 hours 


History – 3 hours


Fine Arts – 3 hours (course must be an appreciation or theory course, not a studio or skills          course)


Electives (for students not majoring in humanities or fine arts) 
– two courses for 6 hours

Students may select courses from art, art history, communication, English, film, foreign languages (courses higher than 2150 or culture courses 1080 and 1090, or a second foreign language), history, humanities, music, philosophy, religious studies and theatre.

Among the courses with minimal or no prerequisites are as follows: ARTH 1500; CLC 1010; COMM 1010, 2000; ENGL 2710, 2720, 2730, 2740 and 2760; FILM 1310; FREN 1080 and 1090; GERM 1080 and 1090; HIST 1000 through 1200; HUM 1010, 1200, 2220, 2010 and 2020; JAPN 1080 and 1090; MUS 2200, 2210, 2220, 2240, 2250 and 2420; PHIL 1010, 1020, 2200 and 2400; REL 1220 and 2000; SPAN 1080, 1090 and 1100; and THR 1010 and 1100. However, higher-level humanities courses will satisfy these requirements and may be taken if student has met the prerequisites.

2.   Natural Sciences (UT core requirement is two courses for 6 
hours; College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences requirement is three courses 
for a minimum of 9 hours and must include one laboratory course).

Students will take a minimum of 9 hours of courses in natural sciences and mathematics, in addition to the course taken to meet the mathematics requirement. (Because of The University of Toledo core curriculum requirements, students must take two courses from two different departments other than mathematics.)

Students may select courses from astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics and physics. Among the courses with minimal or no prerequisites are as follows: ASTR 1010, 2010, 2020 and 2050; BIOL 1120, 1140, 1150, 1340, 2010 and 2020; CHEM 1100 and 1150; EEES 1010, 1020, 1030, 1050, 1130, 1140, 1150, 1160 and 1170; BUAD 1020; and PHYS 1050, 1300, 1310, 1320, 1330 and 1750. However, higher-level natural sciences courses will satisfy this requirement and may be taken if the student has met the prerequisites.

3.   Social Sciences (UT core requirement is two courses for six 
hours; the Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences requirement is three courses for nine 
hours).

Students majoring in a social science will need to take six hours from The University of Toledo core curriculum social sciences requirements. Students not majoring in a social science will take nine hours of courses in social sciences. Students may select social science courses that also will meet a UT core social science requirement and one multicultural requirement.

Students may select courses from anthropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology. Among the courses with minimal or no prerequisites areas follows: ANTH 1020, 2020, 2800, and 2900; ECON 1010, 1150 and 1200; GEPL 1010 and 1100; PSC 1200, 1300, 1400 and 1710; PSY 1010; and SOC 1010 and SOC 1750.

I. Writing Across the Curriculum

Students must pass both Composition I and II with a C or better. The College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences recommends that these requirements be met before completing 45 hours of course work. Students in the Honors Program will complete HON 1010 and 1020 to meet the Composition I and II requirement.

After completing Composition I and II (or HON 1010 and HON 1020 for Honors Program students) with a C or better, students must pass two writing intensive courses approved by their Adviser. The College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences recommends that the first of these writing courses be completed within the first 65 hours of course work, and the second within the first 90 hours. One of these courses must be taken within the student’s major. Students with dual majors must take a writing intensive course in each major. Students with interdisciplinary majors will meet this requirement by selecting courses in consultation with their Advisers, who will monitor students’ progress to help them complete these requirements in a timely fashion.

Transfer students from institutions that have required writing intensive courses should have their former institution certify that they have completed writing intensive courses comparable to those required in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences. Transfer students who have not taken writing intensive courses must meet the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Writing Across the Curriculum requirements.

J. Major Area

Every student must complete either a departmental major or an interdepartmental or interdisciplinary major. Courses given in other colleges of the University may be credited to the major only with the approval of the Dean of the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences upon recommendation of the Department Chair. Waiver of a required course or the substitution of a course from another department does not necessarily reduce the minimum credits required in the major.

1. Departmental Major

See the complete list of departmental majors under “Degrees Offered” in the

College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences section of this catalog.


The minimum number of semester hours a student must complete for a departmental major is prescribed by the department, but rarely exceeds 34 hours. The maximum number of hours a student may elect for the major within the total 124 hours for a Bachelor of Arts degree is 40 hours. A student may have two majors from two different departments, provided the requirements of both programs are satisfied. Work in the second major may be accepted as fulfilling the related course requirement upon the approval of the Advisers in both departments. A student cannot use courses from the first major to satisfy the second and vice-versa.  See section on “Earning a Second Degree” for statement on requirements when two or more desired major programs are offered as different degrees.

2.  Interdisciplinary Majors

A student may complete one of the interdisciplinary majors if accepted into that particular program. A student completing a departmental major and a second major in an interdisciplinary or interdepartmental major cannot use courses from the first major to satisfy the second or vice-versa. See the complete list of interdisciplinary majors under “Degrees Offered” in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences section of this catalog.

3. Interdepartmental Major

A student who chooses an interdepartmental major must complete at least 60 hours divided approximately equally among three related departments. These 60 hours are in lieu of the prescribed hours in a departmental major and the 18 hours in related courses (see K below).

The student must have at least a C average in all courses attempted in each of the three departments of the interdepartmental major. In planning a program, the student must consult with the interdepartmental Adviser of the college to select courses in each area that have the approval of the appropriate department Chair.

 The three departments selected from the list of departmental majors (found under “Degrees Offered” in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences section of this catalog) are subject to the approval of the Dean and the department Chairs concerned. A student completing a departmental major and second major in an interdisciplinary or interdepartmental major cannot use courses from the first major to satisfy the second or vice-versa.

 K. Related Courses

 Every student who chooses a departmental major and students in some interdisciplinary majors also must complete a minimum of 18 hours in courses related to the major. These 18 hours must be in addition to courses taken to fulfill the basic requirements listed above. Each department defines the areas from which courses may be chosen by its majors, and these listings are given in the later sections of this catalog under Programs of Study. Related courses must be chosen from courses acceptable for credit in a College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences major. Generally, these are upper-level courses.

 Courses given in other colleges of the University may be credited to the major or to related courses only with the approval of the Dean of the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences upon recommendation of the department Chair.

 L. Minors

 Many College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences departments offer minors. Departmental requirements for particular minors are given in later sections of the catalog under Programs of Study. Students wishing to pursue minors should consult with their primary program Advisers and then with an Adviser in the Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences college office. Not all minors can be added to all degree programs. Courses selected for the minor must be chosen from courses acceptable for credit toward a major in that department. In meeting requirements for some majors, work in the minor may be accepted as fulfilling the 18 hours of related courses, but only with the approval of the student’s major Adviser. Students completing a minor cannot use courses from their minor to satisfy requirements in the major. No more than six hours of courses taken for minor credit may be applied to the total College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences distributive requirements. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in the minor. Students must complete a minimum of 21 hours for a minor; at least nine of those hours must be completed at The University of Toledo.

 Premedical, Predental and Preveterinary Program

 Sharon L. Schnarre, Adviser

 Students interested in professional medical, dental or veterinary careers may choose to apply for the premedical, predental and preveterinary programs. Students choosing this option must also complete the requirements for a major in a specific discipline or in an interdisciplinary baccalaureate program. 

 Because admission to a professional school is very competitive, students need to maintain high GPAs, both cumulative and in the sciences. The premedical/predental Adviser will continually monitor a student’s academic performance and make recommendations as to whether this program should be continued. If at any time a student’s GPA drops below a 3.0, the student will be dropped from the program, unless extenuating circumstances exist, in which case the student will be placed on a probationary status until the grades improve.

 The premedical/predental Adviser will assist the student in determining the entrance requirements of the professional school being considered, since these requirements vary among schools. In general, these professional schools specify for entrance a core set of science courses that include one year (two semesters) each of biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and mathematics. Most schools recommend that candidates plan a broad course of study leading to either a B.A. or a B.S. degree in any discipline.

 Honors

 Honors work in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences is available to academically talented students.  The college Honors Program is offered as part of the University Honors Program; departmental honors are offered by individual departments within the college.

 Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Honors Program

 


Student Selection and Admission


 

 Admission to the Honors Program of the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences is competitive and limited to academically talented students. Students entering directly from high school are admitted based on a review of application materials, which include a high school transcript, references, an essay, an extracurricular resume, and ACT or SAT scores. Students with an ACT composite score of 28 or higher (SAT composite of 1240 or higher) and a high school GPA of 3.75 or higher are encouraged to apply. Highly motivated students with an ACT composite of at least 25 (SAT composite of at least 1140) and a minimum high school GPA of 3.5 also are considered for admission to the program.

 Currently enrolled University of Toledo students and transfer students may apply for admission to the College Honors Program if they have completed at least 15, but not more than 60, graded semester hours of college work, and earned a minimum GPA of 3.3 (4.0 scale).

 Students are admitted to the College Honors program on a space-available basis.

 Program Requirements

 In order to graduate with College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Honors, a student must:


•     Complete all requirements for an approved degree program within 
the college.


•     Complete a minimum of 42 semester hours of honors courses, which 
must include:


a.   Six semester hours of Honors Readings Conference (Readings Conference I and Readings Conference II).


b.   A minimum of three semester hours selected from HON 2020 (Multicultural Literatures: The North American Experience) or HON 2030 (Multicultural Literatures: The Non-European World).


c.   A minimum of six semester hours earned by successful completion of two upper-division interdisciplinary seminars offered through the Honors program (HON 4950 and 4960).


d.   All of the requirements for departmental honors in the student’s major. This includes the completion of an honors thesis or project supervised by a faculty member in the major department. Note: For a student pursuing more than one major or an interdepartmental major, the departmental honors requirement may be fulfilled through meeting requirements for one of the student’s majors or in an interdisciplinary manner through a program of selected upper-division course work.


•     Earn a minimum overall GPA of 3.3.

 Retention Standards

 To remain in good standing in the college Honors Program, a student must:


•     Earn a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 by the end of the first year 
(typically at least 30 semester hours); 3.1 by the end of the second 
year (typically at least 60 semester hours); and 3.2 by the end of the 
third year (typically at least 90 semester hours).


•     Make satisfactory progress toward fulfillment of the requirements 
for a degree with honors in the college.

 Honors Courses (HON)

 Honors courses are of two kinds – those offered by the university-wide Honors Program and those offered by various departments and colleges. Consult the appropriate portion of this catalog for a listing.

 Departmental Honors

 Requirements for departmental honors designations are set by the various College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences departments and are described under the departmental entries in this catalog. All departments, however, require successful completion of an honors thesis or project supervised by a faculty member in that department.

It is possible for a student to fulfill all departmental requirements and earn the departmental honors citation upon graduation without participating in the college Honors Program as part of the University Honors Program. The reverse is not possible, however, as the requirements for departmental honors are an integral part of the college Honors Program.  Students with two majors may earn departmental honors in one or both areas of study.  They also may pursue an interdisciplinary honors Thesis; permission of department or program honors Advisers is required.


Undergraduate Programs of Study


 Degrees Offered

Departmental Majors

Anthropology (B.A.)
Communication (B.A.)
Economics (B.A.)
English (B.A. with concentrations in general literature, writing, and creative writing)
French (B.A.)
Geography and Planning (B.A. with optional concentrations in geographic information science and planning)
German (B.A.)
History (B.A.)
Linguistics (B.A.)
Philosophy (B.A.)
Political Science (B.A. with optional specializations in public administration and legal studies)
Psychology (B.A.)
Religious Studies (B.A.)
Sociology (B.A.)
Spanish (B.A.)
Women’s and Gender Studies (B.A.)

Interdisciplinary Studies

Africana Studies (B.A.)
American Studies (B.A.)
Asian Studies (B.A.)
European Studies (B.A.)
General Studies (B.A.)
Global Studies (B.A.)
Humanities (B.A.)
Law and Social Thought (B.A. with optional concentrations in Disability Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies)
Medieval and Renaissance Studies (B.A.)
Middle East Studies (B.A.)
Paralegal Studies and Prelaw (2 + 2 B.A.)
Paralegal Studies and Spanish (2 + 2 B.A.)
Urban Studies

Interdepartmental Majors

Course work is selected from three related departments. Refer to guidelines later under requirements.

Minors

Africana Studies
Anthropology
Arabic
Communication
Business Administration * (multiple minors available)
Communication
Disability Studies (interdisciplinary)
Economics
English (literature, writing)
French (two minors, one in applied)
Geography
German (two minors, one in applied)
Global Studies
History
Japanese
Law and Social Thought
Linguistics
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Public Administration
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Women’s and Gender Studies

*Particular business minors may require specific course work in economics from the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences, as well as courses from the College of Business Administration.  A student interested in pursuing a minor in business administration should consult with an Adviser in the College of Business Administration Student Services Office.


 Programs of Study


 Africana Studies Program

Interdisciplinary Major

Rubin Patterson, Director and Adviser

Degrees Offered: Africana studies offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

A major in Africana Studies consists of a minimum of 33 hours of coursework, 15 required hours of Africana Studies and an additional 18 elective hours, at least 15 of which must be at the 3000/4000 level. Students can choose from the following subjects to fulfill the 15 required hours of the Africana Studies major:

AFST 1100 Introduction to Africana Studies-3 hours

AFST 1200 Introduction to the African Experience-3 hours

or

AFST 2100 Foundations of Black Intellectual History-3 hours

AFST 2300 Black Community Research Methods-3 hours

AFST 3500 Environmental Inequalities & Opportunities-3 hours

or

AFST 3600 Entrepreneurship in the Black Community-3 hours

AFST 4900 Senior Seminar-3 hours

Course work in related disciplines: 18 hours

Requirements for the Minor

Students must complete a total of 21 hours of course work in Africana studies as follows:

Africana Studies Core Courses (15 hours):

AFST 1100 Introduction to Africana Studies

AFST 1200 Introduction to the African Experience

AFST 4900 Senior Seminar

Select one set

AFST 2100 Foundations of Black Intellectual History

AFST 2200 Foundation of Culture in the African Diaspora

or

AFST 2300 Black Community Research Methods

AFST 2400 Social Policy and the Black Community

Electives: 6 hours

Africana studies courses at the 3000 level or above

American Studies Program

Interdisciplinary Major

James Campbell, Director and Adviser

 Degrees Offered: American studies offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

Totaling 40 semester hours, the major consists of 30 semester hours in courses selected from two or three Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences departments in consultation with the American Studies faculty committee and 10 credits for designing and writing an extended research paper on a topic on some aspect of American culture. 18 hours of related courses round out the major and often leave room for a second major within a four-year course of study.

 The Program in American Studies provides students with a broad understanding and appreciation of American life and culture(s). It is an interdisciplinary major in which work is done independently with a faculty committee and adviser shaping a curriculum to suit a student's individual interests and goals. Majors are exposed to various methodologies they learn how historians, artists, geographers, philosophers, literary critics, writers, film makers, social scientists and artists practice their disciplines. They also have the opportunity to work closely with a small faculty committee in researching and writing a senior thesis. The major is for students who want a multifaceted college experience rather than the traditional single focus of one academic department. Some typical areas of emphasis for American Studies are:

 Culture and Community-This emphasis is for students whose interests lie in the study of subcultures within American society. Options include occupational, regional, religious, gender or age groups and the disciplinary orientations might include geography, folklore, women's studies and/or cultural anthropology.

 Society and Social Institutions -Students choosing this emphasis draw their methodology and content from sociology, political science, history and philosophy and look at the larger social and political forces at work at the macro level of American society.

 Artists Expressive Culture -This emphasis focuses on American art, music, dance, literature and film as revelatory of national and regional culture and/or subcultures.

 Anthropology

 (Administered by the Department of Sociology and Anthropology)

Rubin Patterson, Chair

Angela Siner, Adviser

 Degrees Offered: Anthropology offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 The undergraduate major of 33 hours must include the following:

ANTH 2000 ProSeminar in Anthropology I, 1 hour

ANTH 2700 Human Evolution, 3 hours

ANTH 2750 World PreHistory, 3 hours

ANTH 2800 Cultural Anthropology, 3 hours

ANTH 3850 Peoples of World: An Evolutionary Approach, 3 hours

ANTH 4000 ProSeminar in Anthropology II, 2 hours

ANTH 4760 Medical Anthropology, 3 hours

 15 additional elective hours of anthropology courses. Courses in the subfields of anthropology not listed in the catalog can sometimes be arranged through independent study (ANTH 4910, 4920 or 4990) with departmental faculty.

 Students should discuss their personal and professional interests with the undergraduate adviser before selecting elective courses to complete the major.

 Related Hours

The requirement of 18 related hours is to be met with SOC 3290 (Social Statistics), ARTH 2200 (Ethnographic Art) or ARTH 3270 (Topics in Ethnographic Art), ENGL 3730 (Introduction to Folklore), LING 3150 (Linguistic Principles), and six hours of electives. In special circumstances, the undergraduate adviser may approve alternatives to those courses listed above. Students may not take P/NC in major or related courses.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Minor in Anthropology

To complete a minor in anthropology students must complete a minimum of 21 hours of course work: 15 hours of core courses in anthropology and an additional six hours of advanced course work at the 3000 to 4000 level in anthropology.

 A. Core Courses

Requirements for the undergraduate minor must include 15 hours comprised of the following core courses:

ANTH 2700 Human Evolution, 3 hours

ANTH 2800 Cultural Anthropology, 3 hours

ANTH 4760 Medical Anthropology, 3 hours

ANTH 3850 Peoples of the World: An Evolutionary Approach, 3 hours

or

ANTH 3920 Indians of North America, 3 hours

 B. Advanced Courses

With the approval of the departmental adviser, select six hours of course work at the 3000 to 4000 level in anthropology.

 Honors in Anthropology

Qualified juniors and seniors may apply to work for honors in anthropology. The following are requirements for entrance into the Honors Program in anthropology.

A. Admission

3.3 minimum GPA in anthropology courses

3.0 minimum cumulative GPA

12 hours completed work in anthropology

Qualification as an anthropology major

B. Requirements

A student must complete 9 hours of independent work in anthropology. During the final quarter before graduation, the student must pass a comprehensive examination or submit a completed honors thesis. Students should discuss their special interests with faculty members or with the honors adviser, who will help identify an appropriate faculty member to guide the honors work.

 Asian Studies Program

Interdisciplinary Major

 Gene Chang, Director and Adviser

 Degrees Offered: Asian Studies offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 This program is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive and systematic training in Asian affairs for a liberal education and career preparation. Emphasis is placed on political science, economics, history, geography, etc. In addition to academic courses, activities in the Institute for Asian Studies conducted through the Center for International Studies and Programs include lectures, seminars, and study abroad programs in Asia as well as selected exchanges in the region.

 In addition to the general education requirements of the University of Toledo and the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences, students will take 30 hours in Asian Studies selected from the list of courses below.  Students must select courses from a minimum of three different departments; no more than 15 hours of course work from one department will count toward the Asian Studies major. 

 Major Courses: ARTH 2100, 3250; ECON 3500; GEPL 3120; HIST 2700, 2710, 2720, 2730, 4720, 4740 and 4750; PHIL 3500 and 4500; PSC 2680, 4690, 4780 and 4900; REL 3510; JAPN 3000 and 4000 levels.

 With the approval of the adviser, a maximum of six elective hours may be chosen from independent study courses offered by various departments. This general distributive pattern is designed to encourage the student to examine the various aspects of Asian Studies. Asian Studies majors are encouraged to take Japanese, (or Chinese or other Asian languages, if offered) for their foreign language requirement.

 In addition to the 30 hours in the major, students are required to take 18 hours in related courses in humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and business chosen in consultation with the adviser. Under special circumstances, certain courses in other colleges may be used to satisfy the related requirement.

 Department of Communication

 Paul Fritz, Chair

Raymond Jackson, Adviser

 Degrees Offered: Communication offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 The Department of Communication offers undergraduate students the opportunity to focus on one of the four following areas of study:

Broadcasting

Journalism

Public Relations

Interpersonal/Organizational Communication

All Communication majors must complete the following five required courses. It is suggested that majors complete COMM 2000 and COMM 2400 by the end of the sophomore year. Majors should take COMM 3870 during their junior year and register for COMM 4910 only after achieving senior status. COMM 2600 may be taken at anytime.

 All communication majors are required to take a minimum of 35 hours and a maximum of 43 hours of communication classes. Students must take a minimum of 8 hours from the list of Applied Communication classes and a minimum of 8 hours from the list of Conceptual Communication classes. It is suggested that students also take between 2 and 6 hours of Professional Experience classes.

 Applied Communication Classes

COMM 2100, 2120, 2150, 2210, 2220, 2630, 2810, 2990, 3150, 3270, 3280, 3610, 3810, 3830, 3880 and 4630 toward the minimum requirement of eight hours.

 Conceptual Communication Classes

COMM 3180, 3820, 3840, 3850, 3890, 4090, 4100, 4220, 4250, 4330, 4640, 4810, 4820, 4830, 4900 and 4990. Independent Study hours (COMM 4990) may not count toward the minimum requirement of eight hours.

 All communication majors must take a minimum of 18 semester hours in related areas. These classes are to be chosen in consultation with a departmental Adviser.

 Requirements for the General Communication Minor

1. All communication minors are required to take COMM 2000 Mass Communication and Society and COMM 2400 Information Analysis and Synthesis.

2. In addition, students are required to take a total of 15 hours, six to nine semester hours from the applied and conceptual categories. Applied communication courses include the following: COMM 2100, 2120, 2150, 2210, 2220, 2600, 2630, 2810, 2990, 3150, 3270, 3280, 3610, 3810, 3830, 3880 and 4630.

Independent Study hours (COMM 2990) may not count toward the minimum requirement of six hours.

Conceptual communication courses include the following: COMM 3180, 3290, 3720, 3820, 3840, 3850, 3890, 4090, 4210, 4220, 4250, 4330, 4640, 4810, 4830, 4900 and 4990. Independent Study hours (COMM 4990) may not count toward the minimum requirement of six hours.

 Honors in Communication

Communication majors may graduate with departmental honors by meeting the following qualifications.

 Admission:

• Junior or Senior status

• 3.25 minimum GPA in Communication

• 3.0 minimum cumulative GPA

• Completion of three Department of Communication core courses: COMM 2000, COMM 2400, COMM 2600

• An interview with an Honors Adviser

• A letter of application that explains the student's plan of work for the student's proposed Honors Thesis or Project (i.e., a brief prospectus)

• Consent of Department of Communication Honors Adviser Requirements:

• All general requirements for undergraduate Communication major

• Completion of Honors Thesis or Project as approved by Adviser (the Thesis or Project is intended to be creative, independent work, meeting high scholarly or professional standards, undertaken by the student under the supervision of faculty)

• Defense or public presentation of Thesis or Project

• 12 hours in courses designated as Communication Honors

 Any 3000 or 4000 level Communication course may be designated as "Honors" with the Instructor's permission and his/her assignment of suitable reading and research/project in addition to normal course work.

 Disability Studies Program

Interdisciplinary Major

 James Ferris, Ability Center of Greater Toledo Endowed Chair and Adviser

 Degrees Offered: Disability Studies offers a minor.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Minor

 The minor in the Program of Disability Studies will consist of a minimum of 12 hours of required courses and at least 9 hours of upper-division electives (3000 level or above) chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor from the list of recommended electives below.


Disability Studies Minor



 Suggested Introductory Course for Disability Studies

DST 2020* Disability Studies in the U.S.

*Does not count toward minor, but can be used to count as a U.S. diversity course

 Required Disability Studies Courses

DST 3020 Definitions of Disability

DST 3030 Issues in Disability Studies

DST 4890 Disability Studies Research and Methodologies

DST 4940 Internship

 Suggested Electives



Humanities


ENGL 3050 Persuasive Writing

HIST 4490 Witchcraft and Magic in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

HIST 4830 Theory of Public History

HIST 4980 The Holocaust

PHIL 3310 Science and Society

PHIL 3370 Medical Ethics

WGST 4160 Health and Gender

WGST 4170 Mental Health and Gender

WGST 4980  Feminism and Disability

Social Sciences

ANTH 4760 Medical Anthropology

ECON 4750 Health Economics

GEPL 3750 Transportation Geography

GEPL 3810 Political Geography

GEPL 4530 Principles of Urban Planning

GEPL 4550 Community Economic Planning

GEPL 4600 Urban Design

PSC 3800 Sexual Politics

PSC 4330 Health Care Policy

PSC 4350 Health Care Delivery Systems

PSC 4410 Management of Non-Profit Organizations

PSC 4530 Civil Rights

PSC 4860 Feminist Political Theory

PSY 3200 Personality and Individual Differences

PSY 3210 Clinical Psychology

PSY 3320 Psychopathology of Childhood

SOC 4180 Medical Sociology

 Department of Economics

 Michael Dowd, Chair

Kristen Keith, Adviser

 Degrees Offered: Economics offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 The requirement of 30 hours in economics must include, from among the following, 15 hours of core courses and 15 hours of electives.

Economics majors are required to take the following courses:

 ECON 1150 Principles of Macroeconomics *

ECON 1200 Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 2810 Introduction to Econometrics

ECON 3150 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 3200 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

 *ECON 1880 can substitute for ECON 1150 and 1200

 Economics electives: 15 hours, chosen in consultation with the Economics Adviser

 Related courses required for an economics major:

The college requirement of 18 hours in related courses should be met with courses chosen in consultation with the department’s undergraduate Adviser. The following courses are required:

MATH 1850 Calculus I

or

MATH 1260 Modern Business Math I and

MATH 1270 Modern Business Math II

MATH 2630 Introduction to Business Statistics

 Majors are encouraged to meet the mathematics and statistics requirements at an early stage of their course work.

 In the major area, 21 hours are to be taken under the regular grading system; the P/NC option is available for the remaining 9 hours and for all related courses.

 The department will award credit after reviewing the advanced placement tests. Students with a score of 3, 4, or 5 will receive credit for ECON 1150 if the macroeconomics portion of the test was taken and ECON 1200 if the microeconomics portion of the test was taken.

 Undergraduate Research

The department of economics offers students the opportunity to gain research experience under faculty guidance. Research topics can be theoretical analysis, empirical analysis or both. Further options regarding the level of research are available, as the department offers junior- and senior-level courses – ECON 3900, 3910, 4910 and 4920. A student interested in conducting research needs to register for one of those four courses with the consent of a faculty member who agrees to direct the student’s research. Students may enroll in these courses more than once. If they do, however, they are encouraged to work with different faculty members to obtain more diverse research experiences.

 Requirements for a Minor in Economics

Students electing to minor in economics must complete a minimum of 21 hours of course work. The 12 hours of required course work listed below for a minor in economics provide the theoretical and quantitative skills essential for a fundamental understanding of the discipline of economics and a rigorous background for an in- depth appreciation of upper division courses. Each program of study for a minor must receive the prior approval of the departmental Adviser. A minimum GPA of 2.0 must be achieved in courses within the minor.

 Courses required for a minor in economics:

ECON 1150 Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 1200 Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 3150 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

or another macro course chosen with the consent of the Undergraduate Adviser

ECON 3200 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

or another micro course chosen with the consent of the Undergraduate Adviser

 Minor Electives

Additional nine hours from course work in economics at the 3000 to 4000 levels, chosen in consultation with the undergraduate advisor. No more than three hours of ECON 4910 or 4920 may be included in the nine hours of additional course work.

 Honors in Economics

Qualified juniors and seniors are invited to work for the citation “honors in economics.”

 A. Admission: The Honors Program is open to all undergraduate economics majors whether or not they are enrolled in College Honors. Students who have shown superior ability in their freshman and sophomore years and who show promise of continuing good performance in the major should apply to the department for enrollment in the departmental Honors Program. Ordinarily, the student must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.

B. Requirements: To be awarded departmental honors in economics, the student must complete a senior thesis and must take nine of the 30-hour major requirements in the honors and honors recognition courses offered by the department. Every regularly scheduled 4000-level course can be given honors recognition by assigning readings and research in addition to the normal requirements of the course. To remain in the program, the student ordinarily must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 in the major.

 English Language and Literature

 Sara Lundquist, Chair

Tim Geiger, Associate Chair and Writing Adviser

Andrew Mattison, Undergraduate Adviser

Melissa Gregory, Honors Adviser

Jane Bradley, Director of Creative Writing

Anthony Edgington, Director of Composition

 Degrees Offered: English offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 Advanced Placement

Students with a score of 3 will receive credit for Composition I; those with a score of 4 will receive credit for Composition I and one course in the ENGL 2700 series; those with a score of 5 will receive credit for Composition I and II and ENGL 2700 level.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 The English major offers three concentrations: General Literature, General Writing, Creative Writing

All concentrations require a minimum of 36 credit hours.

The major core, required of all concentrations. These courses are offered at least once a year.

ENGL 3600: American Literary Traditions OR ENGL 3610 British Literary Traditions.

ENGL 3790: Foundations of Literary Study.

ENGL 3510: Linguistic Principles.

ENGL 3810: Shakespeare.

 Specific concentrations requirements:

General Literature:

One 4000-level course in British literature before 1800

One 4000-level course in British literature after 1800

One 4000-level course in American literature

One 4000-level course examining single author in depth

Four 3-credit 3000-4000 level electives

 General Writing:

One 4000-level course in British literature before 1800

One 4000-level course in British literature after 1800

One 4000-level course in American literature

One 4000-level course examining single author in depth

Two writing courses at the 4000 level and two at either the 3000 or 4000 level

 Creative Writing:

ENGL 3010: Creative Writing

ENGL 4030: Writing Workshop in Nonfiction

ENGL 4070: Writing Workshop in Poetry

ENGL 4080: Writing Workshop in Fiction

ENGL 4890: Capstone, Senior Seminar in Writing

Two Creative Writing elective

One 4000-level Literature courses

 Related fields

The major requires 18 total credit hours in related fields outside of English, half of which must be on the 3000- or 4000-level. These are usually chosen from the other humanities, the social sciences, and interdisciplinary programs. The related are requirement may also be satisfied by taking a minor.

 Requirements for the minor in English

Students may earn a minor in English with either a Literature or a Writing Concentration.

 Minor in English with Literature Concentration

ENGL 3790 Foundations of Literary Studies

ENGL 3600 American Literary Tradition OR

ENGL 3610 British Literary Traditions

ENGL 3810 Shakespeare

One course, British Literature 4000 level

One course, American Literature, 4000 level

Two English Literature courses at 3000 or 4000 level

 Minor in English with Writing Concentration

ENGL 3790 Foundations of Literary Studies

ENGL 3600 American Literary Traditions OR

ENGL 3610 British Literary Traditions

Two course in Literature, one at 4000 level

Three courses in Writing, one at 3000-4000 level

 Honors in English

An honors candidate must be a junior or senior, have completed 15 hours of 3000-4000 level English courses, have a GPA of 3.6 or higher in 3000-4000 level English courses, discuss the possibility of departmental Honors with the English Honors adviser prior to enrolling, fulfill the departmental Honors requirements in addition to the hours required for the major, receive an A on the thesis to receive the designation of Honors. Students do not have to be enrolled in the College Honors program to pursue departmental Honors.

 European Studies

Interdisciplinary Major

 Mark Denham, Adviser

 European Studies was developed to offer students a comprehensive approach to Western, Central, and Eastern European affairs for a liberal education background and career preparation. A multidisciplinary perspective is offered, with most studies focused on political science, history, sociology, and foreign languages. The offerings in the disciplines participating in this major are far-reaching in scope and yet provide for in-depth studies of individual countries or sub-regions, tailored to the individual student’s interest or needs.

 The following outline constitutes a guideline for a students who would, in consultation with the adviser in European Studies, work out a specific program of 45 required hours.

 Approximately 21 hours from the social sciences, as approved by the adviser. Examples of courses include:

GEPL 3030

ECON 3410, 3500

PSC 2620, 4610, 4620

Approximately 24 hours from the humanities, as approved by adviser. Examples of courses include:

HIST 2180, 2650, 4100, 4510

CLC 2050, 2060

PHIL 3250, 4240, 4260

 European Language Courses:

Students must also satisfy the foreign language requirement for the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences

 
 Foreign Languages

 Ruth Hottell, Chair and Undergradute Adviser, French           

Oscar Lepeley, Undergraduate Adviser for Minors, Spanish

Juan Martin, Undergraduate Adviser, Spanish

Freiederike Emonds, Undergraduate Adviser, German

Kathleen Thompson-Casado, Undergraduate Adviser, Spanish

 Degrees Offered: The Department of Foreign Languages offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 In addition to courses in classical civilization taught in English, the Department of Foreign Languages offers instruction in the following foreign languages: Arabic, French, German, Japanese, Latin, and Spanish. A major can be earned in the areas of French, German, and Spanish; Departmental Honors can be pursued in these same areas. A Minor can be earned in any of the major fields as well as Classics and Japanese.

 Advanced Placement

Students with a score of 3 in a modern foreign language will receive credit for 3010; those with a score of 4 will receive credit for 3010 and 3020; those with a score of 5 will receive credit for 3010, 3020, and 3210/3270 (or equivalent). Students with a score of 3 in Latin will receive credit for 2140; those with a score of 4 will receive credit for 2140; those with a score of 4 will receive credit for 2140 and 2150; those with a score of 5 will receive credit for 2140, 2150 and 3050 (or equivalent).

 Requirements for the Major in French, German, and Spanish

 A minimum of 34 hours is required for the undergraduate major in any of these languages beginning in all case at the 3000 language level. French, German, and Spanish offer two tracks for majors, the general and the applied language or business track.

 Required course for the general French major are: FREN 3010, 3020, 3210, 3220, 3410, 3420, 4010, 4020; and additional 3000-4000 level courses with adviser’s approval. Required courses for German are: GERM 3010, 3020, 3200, 3410 or 3420, 4010, 4020, and additional 3000-4000 level courses with adviser’s approval. Required course for Spanish are: SPAN 3000, 3010, 3020 (or 3270, 3280), 3410 (or 3420), 4010 (or 4110), and additional 3000-4000 level courses with adviser’s approval.

 Required courses for Applied French major are: FREN 3010, 3020, 4010, 4020; 3220 or other literature course; 2 courses from: 3410, 3420, 4200 or 4980 culture topics course; 3170 and one of the following: 4070, 4190, or 4980 applied course work topics; and additional 3000-4000 level courses. Required courses for the Applied German major are: GERM 3010, 3020, 4010, 4020; 3200 or other literature course; 2 courses from: 3410, 3420, 4200, or 4980 culture topics course; 2 courses from: 3170, 3180, 4940, or 4980 applied course work topics 3170 or 3180 must be taken); and additional 3000-4000 level courses. Required courses for Business Spanish major are: SPAN 3000, 3010, 3020, 4000 (or 4010), either 3220 or 3280; 3410 and 3420; 3170 and 4370; and additional 3000-4000 level courses.

 Honors in Foreign Languages

Qualified students are invited to pursue Honors in a French, German, or Spanish major and thereby earn the degree designation of “Departmental Honors” in their specific field upon graduation. Formal application for Departmental Honors must be made in the Department Office (Field House Room 2400F). Normally, a petition for admission to the program should be made near the end of the sophomore year. Formal acceptance is based on the following: 1) Junior or senior standing; 2) A GPA of 3.3 overall in the major; and 3) Approval by the language Honors adviser and the Chairperson of the Department of Foreign Languages.

 To graduate with the degree designation of “Departmental Honors,” the student must: 1) Satisfy the standards requirements listed above for the major; 2) Maintain a GPA of 3.3 overall and in the major; 3) Satisfactorily complete a minimum of 12 hours of departmental honors course work at the 3000- or 4000 level; and 4) include among the 12 hours the Honors Research course (FREN, GERM, or SPAN4960) that normally leads to the completion of an Honors thesis.

 Minor in Foreign Languages

In Classics, a minimum of 21 hours is required for the minor. At least 9 hours must be in Latin above the intermediate level. The remaining hours must include classical civilization courses (excluding CLC 1010 Classical Humanities) or additional course work in Latin.

 A minimum of 22 hours is required for the Minor in French, German, Japanese, or Spanish (Spanish requires 21-22 hours). In the modern languages, all course work must be in the same language and at the 3000 level or higher. Required courses include the following:

 General and Applied French Minor

FREN 3010, 3020 6 hours
FREN 4010, 4020 7 hours

 General German Minor

GERM 3010, 3020 6 hours
GERM 3200, 3410, 3420, or 4200 3 hours
GERM 4010, 4020 7 hours

Applied German Minor

GERM 3010, 3020 6 hours
GERM 3410, 3420, 4200, 4980 (as applicable) 3 hours
GERM 3170 or 3180 3 hours
GERM 4010, 4020 7 hours

 Japanese Minor

JAPN 3010, 3020 6 hours
JAPN 4010, 4020   7 hours
 

Spanish Minor

SPAN 3000 3 hours
SPAN 3010, 3020 6 hours
SPAN 3210, 3220, 3270, or 3280 3 hours
SPAN 3410 or 3420 3 hours
SPAN 4010 or 4020 3-4 hours

Total required for each = 22 hours (Spanish 21-22 hours)

Students wishing to receive a minor in Foreign Languages have the responsibility, in consultation with the adviser in their major, to see that the necessary course work is included in the total number of undergraduate courses taken. Students outside the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences should make sure that the minor in Foreign Languages is an approved program within their college.

Candidates for the minor in Foreign Languages must have their course work verified and approved by a Foreign Language Department adviser or that department’s chairperson at the time they make formal application for graduation. A form for this verification can be obtained the college or department office.

Courses required for either the major or minor may not be taken P/NC; however, up to 12 hours of P/NC course work may be included in the related area.

Study Abroad

Credit for foreign language study abroad will be given only for those accredited courses or programs approved in advance. Students should apply for approval at the Department of Foreign Languages at least one month prior to the anticipated date of departure. Credit will be granted only upon presentation of a formal certificate indicating the hours completed and examinations passed.

 Geography and Planning

 Patrick Lawrence, Chair
David J. Nemeth, B.A. Coordinator, Undergraduate Adviser

Degrees Offered: Geography and Planning offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

31 Hours Required

a) Environmental Geography & Planning – one of:

GEPL 3610, Conservation and Resources

GEPL 4540, Weather and Climate

GEPL 4650, Physical Geography

b) Human-Economic Geography – one of:

GEPL 2030-4990 except GEPL 3420, GEPL 4540, GEPL 4650, GEPL 4490, GEPL 4500, GEPL 4510

c) GEPL 3420, Quantitative Methods

d) GEPL 2010, Fundamentals of Geography

e) Elective Hours (remainder of hours)

Concentration in GIS

A Bachelor of Arts in Geography with Concentration in Geographic Information Science

GEPL 2010, Fundamentals of Geography

GEPL 3420, Quantitative Methods and Mapping

GEPL 4110, Geographic Information Systems

GEPL 4180, Geographic Information Systems Applications

GEPL 4490, Remote Sensing Environment

GEPL 4500, Digital Image Analysis

GEPL 4520, Analytical and Computer Cartography

GEPL 4580, Location Analysis

Concentration in Planning

A Bachelor of Arts in Geography with Concentration in Planning

Required Core Courses (19 hours)

GEPL 2010, Fundamentals of Geography

GEPL 3420, Quantitative Methods and Mapping

GEPL 4210, Land Use Planning

GEPL 4530, Principles of Urban Planning

GEPL 4600, Urban Design

GEPL 4700, Community Planning Workshop

Electives (12 hours)

GEPL 3460, Geography of Housing

GEPL 3610, Conservation and Resources

GEPL 3900, Environmental Planning

GEPL 4550, Community Economic Development

GEPL 4570, Land Development and Planning

GEPL 4710, Urban Environments

Total 31 hours

Minor in Geography

Core Curriculum:

GEPL 2010, Fundamentals of Geography

GEPL 2030, Cultural Geography

GEPL 4530, Principles of Urban Planning

GEPL 4650, Physical Geography

GEPL 4710, Urban Environments

One Regional Course Selected from:

GEPL 3030, Geography of Europe

GEPL 3120, Geography of Asia

GEPL 3220, Geography of Africa

GEPL 3300, Geography of Latin America

GEPL 4060, Geography of Great Lakes

One Planning Course Selected from:

GEPL 4210, Land Use Planning

GEPL 4530, Principles of Urban Planning

GEPL 4550, Community Economic Development

GEPL 4570, Land Development and Planning

GEPL 4600, Urban Design

GEPL 4700, Community Planning Workshop

 Minor in GIS

A Minor in Geographic Information Science

Required Courses (23 hours)

GEPL 2010, Fundamentals of Geography

GEPL 4110, Geographic Information Systems

GEPL 4180, Geographic Information Applications

GEPL 4490, Remote Sensing of the Environment

GEPL 4500, Digital Image Analysis

GEPL 4520, Analytical and Computer Cartography

Minor in Planning

Core Curriculum (19 hours)

GEPL 4210, Land Use Planning

GEPL 4530, Principles of Urban Planning

GEPL 4600, Urban Design

GEPL 4700, Community Planning Workshop

Electives (10 hours) Selected from:

GEPL 3460, Geography of Housing

GEPL 3900, Environmental Planning

GEPL 4550, Community Economic Development

GEPL 4570, Land Development and Planning

GEPL 4710, Urban Environments

Total 22 hours

REU Program

The University of Toledo also hosts an annual Research Experience for Undergraduates, or REU. A limited number of students with an interest in biology, ecology, geology, geography, and environmental science are selected to work for the summer with professors, graduate students, and research scientists on local environmental issues. For nine weeks, an REU gains first-hand experience in collecting field measurements, analyzing data, and presenting their findings. Each year’s program will be posted on the website.

Honors in Geography and Planning

The honors program in Geography and Planning is open to all qualified undergraduate majors whether or not they are enrolled in College Honors. The following are requirements for entrance into the Honors program in Geography and Planning:

Admission:

  1. The student must maintain a 3.5 minimum GPA in Geography and Planning courses.
  2. The student must maintain a 3.3 minimum cumulative GPA.
  3. 12 hours completed work in Geography and Planning
  4. Qualification as a Geography and Planning major whether or not they are enrolled in College honors

Requirements:

A student must complete 9 hours in designated honors courses in Geography and Planning and a 4-hour senior honors thesis project. During the final year before graduation, the student will meet with the department’s undergraduate advisor to select a faculty research advisor, complete and submit to the department’s faculty for approval a senior honors project (GEPL 4960).

Senior Honors Thesis

The title of the senior honors thesis is reported to the undergraduate advisory who will then select a faculty research advisor for the student. The title of the honor’s thesis must be filed no later than one semester prior to the expected date of graduation. A copy must also be filed in the library of the Department and students are also expected, as a courtesy, to provide members of their thesis committee with copies.

 Global Studies

Interdisciplinary Major

 Mark Denham, Adviser

Degrees Offered: Global Studies offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Global Studies is a major that allows students to study a variety of international processes in a comprehensive and multidisciplinary program of study. The curriculum is planned so that it offers students a background in global affairs in the broadest sense, as well as an opportunity to focus on one geographic area of the world and one international interest area.

 
History

William J. O’Neal, Department Chair
Charles Beatty Medina, Undergraduate Major and Minor Adviser

Degrees Offered: History offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

The major of 33 hours in History must be distributed as follows:

 A. HIST 2000 (4 hours)

 B. Of the remaining 29 hours, 12 to 16 hours (4 courses) must be at the 4000 level. At least 9 to 12 of these 29 hours (3 courses) shall be in fields of United States history, and at least 9 to 12 hours (3 courses) must be in fields of non-United States history.

 The requirement of 18 hours in related courses is to be met with courses chosen from at least 3 of the following areas: economics, political science, English and American literature, foreign language, geography, philosophy, sociology, psychology, art history, music history or theatre history. At least 12 of the hours in related courses must be at the 3000 and 4000 levels.

 The related course requirement may be met with completion of a minor in another discipline or a second major.

 Student may not take P/NC for the minimum requirements for the major, but may opt for P/NC in all related courses.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Minor in History

The minor of 21 hours in History must be distributed as follows:

 A. HIST 2000 (4 hours)

B. Of the remaining 17 hours, 9 hours must be at the 4000 level.

Honors in History

Qualified students are invited to work for the degree citation “honors in history.”

A. Admission: History majors who demonstrate unusual promise in the study of history are invited by the department to enroll in the University Honors Program; departmental mental honors may be pursued concurrently. Admission to departmental honors is based on the following:

1. Sophomore standing

2. Overall minimum GPA of 3.0

3. A minimum GPA of 3.3 in all history courses (a minimum of 10 hours)

4. Recommendation from two professors

5. An interview with the Adviser

B. Requirements: To earn departmental honors in history, each student will satisfactorily complete the following. The required credit hours are included among the 33 hours necessary for the major in history.

1. Honors recognition in two history courses. Honors recognition courses are regularly scheduled 3000 to 4000 level courses in which special recognition is achieved by reading and research in addition to the normal requirements of the course.

2. Three hours of independent research under Junior Honors Research (HIST 3870).

3. Six hours of thesis under Senior Honors Research (HIST 4870, 4880) leading to the completion of a senior thesis.

4. Oral examination covering the area of the senior thesis.

Law and Social Thought

Interdisciplinary Major

Renee Heberle, Co-Director, Adviser

Jerry Van Hoy, Co-Director, Adviser

Sam Nelson, Pre-Law Adviser

Degrees Offered: Law and Social Thought offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

LST’s Curriculum is strictly interdisciplinary. It provides students with tools for the appraisal of U.S. and other legal systems and the policies, practices and philosophies that underlie them. It encourages reflection on the values that shape citizenship in contemporary democracy. It also focuses on issues of law in relation to morality, politics, language and the arts of critical and creative thinking. LST students are given the responsibility of determining their path through LST, with hands-on advising from the co-directors, and are consulted on questions of program direction and course selection. The Upper Division Seminars are selected by student in collaboration with faculty.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 LST 2010, Gateway Course, 3 hours

LST 2500, 3500, Pro-seminars, 3 hours

LST Elective Courses/Cross-Listed Courses, 18 hours

Path 1: Law, History, and Theory

Path 2: Law, Difference, and Social Practices

Path 3: Law, Institutions, and Public Policy

Path 4: Comparative Law

LST 4900, Upper Division Seminars, 9 hours

LST 4990, Capstone Seminar

LST 4940, Field Experience, 3-6 hours

Every LST student is required to turn in a graduation portfolio.

Concentrations

 Women’s and Gender Studies

Disability Studies

Honors in LST

 Majors in Law and Social Thought are strongly encouraged to pursue program honors. In order to earn program honors, the student must:

1. Have a minimum LST GPA of 3.4 and a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3.

2. Submit two papers from different, advanced LST courses to Program Directors. These courses will also satisfy the LST elective or upper division seminar requirements.

3. Write a thesis under the direction of an LST-affiliated faculty member. Students must enroll in Honors Thesis in Law and Social Thought. Participation in the University Honors College is not required for those seeking program honors.

4. Honors Thesis in Law and Social Thought (3 hours) will count as an elective course in the required courses for the major.

Minor in Law and Social Thought

Courses taken in the minor must come from a discipline other than the student’s major discipline to ensure that the minor will provide intellectual breadth complementary to a specialized curriculum in a traditional discipline.

Core Requirements (6 hours):

LST 2010, Gateway Course, 3 hours

Critical Reasoning, 3 hours

Electives (15 hours):

Five electives cross-listed or taught for the Law and Social Thought program. Electives should be chosen from one of the four paths listed above in the degree requirements for Law and Social Thought majors.

At least one elective must be a law and social thought upper division seminar (LST 4900) compatible with the chosen path.

Independent Study

No more than one independent study will count toward completion of the minor.

Program of Study

The student’s program of study must be approved by a program Adviser and verified before graduation.

Field Experience

Students working toward a minor in Law and Social Thought will be invited to participate in field experience, and elective credit will be offered depending on the student’s level of involvement.

Linguistics

(Administered by the Department of English)

Sara Lundquist, Department Chair, English

Douglas Coleman

Melinda Reichelt

 Degrees Offered: Linguistics offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 Required Courses

LING/ENGL 3150, Introduction to Linguistics, 3 hours

LING 3160, Grammatical Description I: Phonology, 3 hours

LING 3170, Grammatical Description II: Syntax, 3 hours

LING 3180, Grammatical Description III: Morphology, 3 hours

LING 3190, Sociolinguistics

Historical Linguistics: Choose one

ENGL/LING 4110, The History of English, 3 hours

FREN 4040, French Linguistics, 3 hours

GERM 4500, History of the German Languages, 3 hours

SPAN 4070, History of the Spanish Languages, 3 hours

Structure of a Language: Choose one

ENGL/LING 4110, Old English, 3 hours

ENGL/LING 4120, Middle English, 3 hours

LING 4980, Special Topics (with adviser’s approval)

FREN 4010, French Syntax and Stylistics I, 3 hours

FREN 4020, French Syntax and Stylistics II, 3 hours

GERM 4010, German Syntax and Stylistics I, 3 hours

GERM 4020, German Syntax and Stylistics II, 3 hours

SPAN 4110, Introduction to Spanish Linguistics, 3 hours

Additional Courses: Choose Three

ANTH 2800, Cultural Anthropology, 3 hours

LING 4130, American Dialects, 3 hours

LING 4150, Applied Linguistics Research and Theory I, 3 hours

LING 4170, Applied Linguistics Research and Theory II, 3 hours

LING 4180, The Representation of Language in the Brain, 3 hours

LING 4980, Special Topics (with adviser’s approval)

PHIL 3060, 3600, 3630, 4060, 4300, 4600, 4650, 3 hours

PSY 2400, 3400, 3410, 3 hours

Minor in Linguistics

 To minor in Linguistics, a student must complete a minimum of 21 hours in Linguistics. Students must complete ENGL/LING 3150 and at least one of the following courses:

 LING 3160, Grammatical Description I: Phonology, 3 hours

LING 3170, Grammatical Description II: Syntax, 3 hours

LING 3180, Grammatical Description III: Morphology, 3 hours

LING 3190, Sociolinguistics

To satisfy the remaining 15 required hours, student may select any courses which satisfy the Linguistics major.

Honors in Linguistics

 After completing at least 15 of the 30 hours required within the Linguistics major, a students whose GPA is 3.6 or higher in these courses is eligible to participate in Honors in Linguistics. In addition to satisfactorily completing an honor’s thesis, the student may, under appropriate circumstances, participate in another department’s Senior Honors Seminar. The designation “Honors” on the diploma will be given to students who receive an “A” on the honors thesis and maintain a 3.6 GPA in Linguistics. Complete details about Honors in Linguistics are available from the Linguistics adviser.

 Middle East Studies

Interdisciplinary Major

 Elias T. Nigem, Adviser

 Middle East Studies is a specialization within the Global Studies major. Its offerings are designed to provide students an appropriate exposure to the history, religions, cultures, and socioeconomic systems of the Middle East, and in turn, that region’s relations with the rest of the world, as well as to create balanced perceptions of the various factors and phenomena in the Middle East in historical and contemporary contexts.

 The Middle East Studies program requires a total of 48 semester hours that must be completed in consultation with the adviser. The following courses are a guideline for students who are interested in Middle East Studies:

 21 Hours of Social Science Courses:

Required

PSC 4670, 3 hours
PSY 4740, 3 hours

 Electives

ANTH 2750, 3 hours
ANTH 2800, 3 hours
ECON 4510, 3 hours
ECON 4520, 3 hours
GEPL 3810, 3hours
PSC 2700, 3 hours
PSC 4730, 3 hours
SOC 4340, 3 hours
SOC 4800, 3 hours
SOC 4980, 3 hours

21 hours of History/Humanities Courses:

Required

HIST 1120, 3 hours
HIST 2040, 3 hours
HIST 4520, 3hours
HIST 4530, 3 hours

Electives

HIST 2080, 3 hours
HIST 4390, 3 hours
HIST 4400, 3 hours
PHIL 3500, 3 hours
PHIL 3570, 3 hours
REL 2310, 3 hours
REL 2500, 3 hours
REL 3580/PHIL 3580, 3 hours
REL 3350, 3 hours
PHIL 4550/REL 4550, 3 hours
ARBC 1080, 3 hours
ARBC 1090, 3 hours
ARBC 1100, 3 hours
ARBC 1120, 3 hours
ARBC 2140, 3 hours
ARBC 2150, 3 hours

Additional Requirements

Approximately 6 hours of related courses chosen in consultation with the adviser.

Students are encouraged to take courses in foreign languages of the Middle East.

Philosophy and Religious Studies

John Sarnecki, Department Chair

 Degrees Offered: Philosophy offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

The major of 30 hours in Philosophy must include the following:

1. PHIL 3210 and 3230

2. Either PHIL 3000 or 3060

3. Either PHIL 3400 or 3750

4. One of the following Philosophy courses: 3240, 3250, 3500, 3540, 4240, 4250, 4260, 4270 or 4500.

5. At least two 4000-level Philosophy courses

The student also should take 18 hours of related courses. These courses should be selected in consultation with the Adviser.

Students may take a maximum of two courses with P/NC in the major and may opt for P/NC in all related courses.

Majors planning to pursue graduate study in Philosophy are encouraged to take PHIL 3000, 3060, 3400 and 3750, as well as PHIL 3600 or 4000-level courses in these core areas of philosophy.

Specialized programs of study can be designed for majors preparing for professional careers in law, medicine, or business. See the undergraduate adviser for details.

Honors in Philosophy

A. Admission: Junior and senior majors with an overall minimum GPA of 3.3 may work for the citation “honors in philosophy.”

B. Requirements

Upon graduation, the student shall have a 3.6 GPA in philosophy courses. The student shall complete a substantial term paper in each of two courses with two different philosophy faculty members.

  1. One paper shall be work completed for a regular 4000-level seminar.
  2. One paper shall be an honors thesis completed while registered for PHIL 4990 under the direction of a second faculty member.

Upon the recommendation of the two respective instructors and with the approval of a majority of the philosophy faculty, the student shall be awarded the citation “honors in philosophy.”

Minors in Philosophy

A minor in Philosophy complements a variety of University major programs in the humanities, the social and natural sciences, education and business. All minors in Philosophy must meet the following requirements:

1. 21 hours in philosophy with a minimum GPA of 2.0.

2. PHIL 3210 or 3230.

3. At least one course numbered 4000 or above.

4. No more than one independent study, PHIL 4920, will count toward the completion of the minor.

5. The program of study must be approved by the department undergraduate Adviser and verified before graduation.

Specific predesigned programs of study are available in the following areas:

            Prelaw
            Philosophy and medicine
            Philosophy and education
            Philosophy of natural science
            Philosophy of social science

Also available is a philosophy minor with honors. Specific requirements are:

1. Requirements 1 through 5 above.

2. At least two courses at the 4000 level

3. Either an honors section of a 3000-level course or a 3000-level course taken under an honors contract.

4. A minimum GPA of 3.3 in philosophy.

Political Science and Public Administration

Mark Denham, Chair

Lynn Bachelor, Undergraduate Adviser (students whose last names start A-L)

Sam Nelson, Undergraduate Adviser (students whose last names start M-Z), Pre-law Adviser

Renee Heberle, Undergraduate Honors in Political Science

Degrees Offered: Political Science offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

Advanced Placement

Students with a score of 3, 4 or 5 on the American Government and Politics examination will receive credit for PSC 1200.

Students with a score of 3, 4 or 5 on the Comparative Government test will receive credit for PSC 1100.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

Either PSC 1200, American National Government (3 cr.) or PSC 1400, Current Issues in U.S. Public Policy (3 cr.) plus a minimum of 30 additional hours in political science chosen in consultation with a departmental adviser.

In addition, students must take one course from three of the following four fields:

Public Administration

PSC 3420, Public Administration, 3 hours

International Relations

PSC 2700, International Relations, 3 hours

 Comparative Government

PSC 2610, Government of Great Britain, 3 hours

PSC 2620, Comparative Politics of Continental Europe, 3 hours

PSC 2660, Politics in Africa, 3 hours

Political Theory

PSC 2800, Principles of Political Theory, 3 hours

Completion of additional courses in the department to satisfy the 30-hour requirement.

Related course work requirements:

The required 18 hours of related course work should be chosen according to the student's interests and objectives. Selections should be made from 2000-level and higher courses in any other social science (anthropology, economics, geography, psychology and sociology), or in history or philosophy, in consultation with an adviser. Selected courses offered by the Department of Communication or in the College of Business Administration also may be chosen with the permission of an adviser. Completion of a minor or of a second major in any department of the university also will be accepted as completion of the Department's related requirement.

Specialization in Legal Studies

This program is designed to allow students to focus their studies on law, legal processes, and legal institutions for careers in the legal profession, for leadership in public affairs, as well as for an interesting major. This solid liberal arts specialization provides excellent preparation for law school and a subsequent career as a lawyer or judge. 



The specialization requires the completion of 34 hours in political science, as well as the related course work and other requirements that are normal in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences.

The foundation for this specialization is a B.A. in Political Science, within which the student must have included the following three courses: 


PSC 1200, American National Government, 3 hours

PSC 2300, Principles of State and Local Government, 3 hours

PSC 3500, PS Principles of Law

In addition to this 9-credit core, students must take at least four courses from the department's specialized law and legal studies course offerings:

PSC 3510, Constitutional Law I, 3 hours

PSC 3520, Constitutional Law II, 3 hours

PSC 4530, Civil Rights, 3 hours

PSC 4550, Issues in Contemporary Law, 3 hours

PSC 4560, Law & Public Administration, 3 hours

PSC 4570, Judicial Process & Jurisprudence, 3 hours

PSC 4580, International Law, 3 hours

Nine of the remaining 13 hours required for a degree in political science must be earned by completing one course from within three of the four "gateway" fields of the discipline:

Public Administration

PSC 3420, Principles of Public Administration, 3 hours

International Relations

PSC 2700, Principles of International Relations, 3 hours

Comparative Government

PSC 2610, Government of Great Britain, 3 hours

PSC 2620, Comparative Politics of Continental Europe, 3 hours

PSC 2660, Politics in Africa, 3 hours

PSC 2680, Governments of Asia, 3 hours

Political Theory

PSC 2800, Principles of Political Theory, 3 hours

While only one additional elective within political science is required for the Legal Studies specialization, students may elect to complete additional classes in the discipline.

Students in the Legal Studies specialization must also complete the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences related course requirements. This consists of 18 hours of upper level (2000 and above) courses in fields related to legal studies (for example, Law and Society, Criminology, Psychology and the Law, Philosophy of Law, Business Law, etc.) selected in consultation with an adviser.

Specialization in Public Administration

The objective of this program is to prepare students for careers in public and nonprofit organizations upon graduation, as well as to provide a basis for subsequent graduate work in a wide variety of professional programs. 

The specialization requires the completion of 34 hours in political science and public administration, as well as the related course work and other requirements that are normal in the College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences. 

The foundation requirements for this specialization are: 


PSC 1200, American National Government, 3 hours

PSC 2300, Principles of State and Local Government, 3hours

PSC 3110, Social Science Statistics, 3 hours

PSC 3420, Principles of Public Administration, 3 hours

Second, the student is to select one course from among each of the four following areas of specialization:

Organization Theory

PSC 4370, Administrative Behavior, 3 hours

PSC 4410, Management of Nonprofit Organizations, 3 hours

PSC 4470, Public Organization Theory, 3 hours

PSC 4610, Sociology of Organizations, 3hours

MGMT 3030, Managerial and Behavioral Processes in Organizations, 3 hours

Public Policy

PSC 3260, Government & the Economy, 3 hours

PSC 4320, Urban Policy & Administration, 3 hours

PSC 4330, Health Care Policy, 3 hours

PSC 4340, Environmental Policy & Administration, 3hours

PSC 4460, Policy and Administration

Personnel Administration

PSC 4430, Public Personnel Administration, 3 hours

MGMT 3220, Human Resource Management, 3 hours

MGMT, 3630, Conflict Resolution & Negotiations, 3 hours

Financial Administration

PSC 4440, Budget & Finance Administration, 3 hours

ACCT 3010, Cost Accounting for Non-Accounting Majors, 3 hours

Third, since this specialization falls within the B.A. in Political Science, the student must comport with the "gateway" requirements of the degree by selecting one course from among two of the three following subfields of the discipline:

Comparative Government

PSC 2610, Government of Great Britain, 3 hours

PSC 2620, Comparative Politics of Continental Europe, 3 hours

PSC 2660, Politics in Africa, 3 hours

PSC 2680, Governments of Asia, 3 hours

International Relations

PSC 2700, Principles of International Relations, 3 hours

Political Theory

PSC 2800, Principles of Political Theory, 3 hours

Fourth, one additional course in political science is required to amass the required 34 hours of credit for the major. 


Departmental Honors

 Honors work fosters intellectual growth through independent study, involves students in research, prepares students for the intellectual rigor of graduate study, and makes students more competitive for the best employment opportunities upon graduation.

 Departmental Honors prepares majors for post-graduate study, for law school, for advanced work in policy research, and for other professional pursuits. However, it is open to all interested in engaging in independent intensive, research oriented intellectual work.

 Honors work is for those in pursuit of excellence in:

Intellectual organization

Concept formation

Research and Writing

These are the skills you will need in many professional positions - whether in the governmental or private sector. Departmental Honors offers the opportunity to specialize in one of the sub-disciplines of Political Science and to work closely with faculty in their areas of interest.

If you aspire to do the kind of work required for Departmental Honors, we encourage you to contact the Honors Adviser (Dr. Heberle). Judge for yourself whether this individualized, intensive program is right for you.

Departmental Honors work is distinct from the University Honors Program, but works closely with it. You must have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 and be in your third year of study to sign up for honors work.

 Minor in Political Science

Students seeking a minor in political science must complete at least 21 hours of course work at the 2000 level or above in the discipline, chosen in consultation with a departmental adviser. It is recommended that minors include in their undergraduate program the introductory course in American Government (PSC 1200) and three of the four gateway subfields. At least 9 of the 21-credit hour minimum must be at the 3000-4000 levels.

Minor in Public Administration

 The minor in public administration is comprised of 21 hours of course work. The minor is not available to undergraduate political science majors; political science majors with an interest in public administration should pursue the specialization in public administration. Students minoring in public administration should take the following courses:

 Required Courses (9 credits):


PSC 3420, Principles of Public Administration, 3 hours

PSC 3110, Social Science Statistics

PSC 4180, Computer Applications in Public Administration or equivalent, 3 hours

Electives (12 credits):

Part A – Two courses from the following:

PSC 4370, Administrative Behavior, 3 hours

PSC 4430, Public Personnel Administration, 3 hours

PSC 4440, Budgeting and Financial Administration, 3 hours

PSC 4460, Policy and Administration, 3 hours

PSC 4470, Public Organization Theory, 3 hours

Part B – Two courses from the following:

PSC 3260, Government and the Economy, 3 hours

PSC 3310, Municipal Government, 3 hours

PSC 3510, Constitutional Law I, 3 hours

PSC 3730, American Foreign Policy, 3 hours

PSC 4250, Intergovernmental Relations, 3 hours

PSC 4330, Health Care Policy, 3 hours

PSC 4340, Environmental Policy & Administration, 3hours

PSC 4350, Health Care Delivery Systems, 3 hours

PSC 4360, Ethics in Public Policy & Administration, 3 hours

PSC 4410, Management of Nonprofit Organizations, 3 hours

PSC 4480, Comparative Public Administration, 3 hours

PSC 4490, Current Topics in Public Administration, 3 hours

Pre-Law

Sam Nelson, Adviser

Unlike some pre-professional programs, there is no fixed pre-law curriculum. Critical reading, writing and speaking dominate legal practice and legal education; thus, the central theme of any pre-law course of study should be the development of these skills in the context of areas of substantive interest to the student. Clearly, a course of study designated “pre-law” may extend across a broad range of different disciplines and interests and contain a wide variety of courses. Each student's course of study will be different and should reflect, in consultation with advisors, the specific interests of the student and attention to the development of the critical and analytical skills necessary for success in law school and the legal profession.

Psychology

 John D. Jasper, Chair

Rickye Heffner, Honors Adviser

 Undergraduate Advising

University Hall 5320

The Psychology Advising Intake Office is open on a walk-in basis. The graduate students in the advising intake office will answer basic questions about degree requirements and help you tailor your course selections to meet your goals. You will then be able to work out a class schedule to meet your needs on your own.

 Degrees Offered: Psychology offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 The major in Psychology requires a minimum of 34 semester hours of Psychology courses and 18 hours of related courses. It should be noted that courses for the major in Psychology cannot be taken as P/NC.

 The B.A. Curriculum

The B.A. degree in psychology is designed to provide a liberal arts education and to prepare students for graduate training either in a specialized area of psychology (e.g., Experimental or Clinical graduate programs), or for graduate work in related disciplines. Students will be exposed to all of the major substantive areas of psychology. Related courses come from a list pre-approved by faculty in the department. These courses are taught by other departments, but relate closely to various areas of psychology. Fundamentals of Biology (BIOL 2150) with lab (BIOL 2160) is on the list and is the only related course required of all majors. Students who wish to do so can use these BIOL hours toward their natural science requirement. Students are free to choose any other courses from the related list, but should do so in consultation with their advisors.

 The core psychology curriculum is as follows:

A. Required basic psychology courses: 15 hours (Students must select 5 of 6 courses)

 PSY 2200 Abnormal Psychology

PSY 2400 Cognitive Psychology

PSY 2500 Developmental Psychology or PSY 2510 Lifespan Developmental

PSY 2600 Psychobiology

PSY 2610 Learning and Motivation

PSY 2700 Social Psychology

 B. Required methodological courses: 7 hours

 PSY 2100 Statistical Methods* (must earn a grade of C- or higher before taking PSY 3110)

PSY 3110 Research Methods in Psychology

 An Advanced Research Course is no longer required of all majors. Students planning to pursue graduate work in psychology, however, are strongly advised to take an advanced research course from the following list:

 PSY 4100 Research Practicum

PSY 4200 Research in Clinical Psychology

PSY 4400 Research in Cognitive Psychology

PSY 4500 Research in Developmental Psychology

PSY 4600 Research in Psycho biology and Learning

PSY 4700 Research in Social Psychology

PSY 4910 Independent Research

PSY 4960 Honors Thesis

* Students must have a C- or higher in MATH 1320 or higher before taking PSY 2100

 C. Elective psychology courses: 9-14 hours

 This category includes all courses offered by the Department at the 3000- or 4000-level that are not taken to meet requirements A and B.

 No more than a total of 4 hours of Externship in Psychology (PSY 3940), Research Practicum (PSY 4100), Independent Study (PSY 4990), and Independent Research (PSY 4910) combined can be used as electives.

 D. Related courses: 18 hours

 The 18 hours of related courses are taken outside the Department of Psychology, and must be on the related list and/or approved by the student's Department advisor.

 At least 9 hours must be courses numbered 3000 or higher

Fundamentals of Biology (BIOL 2150), with lab (BIOL 2160), must be included in the Related Courses category (or taken as part of the natural science requirement)

A minor in another department or a second major may be used to complete the remaining Related Courses requirement, with the advisor's approval.

 Honors in Psychology

 Requirements for Admission

 Psychology majors are encouraged to earn the graduation citation "Honors in Psychology" through the Department of Psychology honors program. A student can be admitted at any time but no later than the end of the first semester of their junior year. The following criteria must be met for admission to the program:

 An overall GPA of 3.8 or higher -or- Good standing in the College Honors program

A GPA in Psychology courses of 3.4 or higher

Recommendation by two Department faculty members

 Check with your advisor about your suitability for honors. If interested, contact the Department Honors Advisor for application materials.

 Requirements for Graduation with Honors in Psychology

 Once admitted, Honors students must meet all Requirements for the Undergraduate Major with the addition of:

 Honors Proposal PSY 3800: Review a topic under the guidance of a faculty member and design and write a proposal for an empirical research project, 3 hr credit

Honors Research PSY 3910: Carry out the proposed research project, 3 hr credit

Honors Thesis PSY 4960: Analyze the data from the research project, write the results for a research publication in APA style, and present it formally to department faculty, 3 hr credit

The final GPA in all Psychology courses must be 3.4 or higher.

 Minor in Psychology

 Students electing to minor in psychology at the University of Toledo must complete a minimum of 21 semester hours of course work: 12 hours of basic courses in Psychology and an additional 9 hours of advanced Psychology courses.  Each program of study must be approved by a department advisor. A minimum GPA of 2.0 must be achieved in courses within the minor.  Courses in the minor may NOT be taken as P/NC.

 The curriculum is as follows:

A. Basic psychology courses: 12 hours

 With the approval of a Department advisor, the student must select 4 out of 5 of the following:

 PSY 2200 Abnormal Psychology

PSY 2400 Cognitive Psychology

PSY 2500 Developmental Psychology or PSY 2510 Life span Developmental Psychology

PSY 2600 Psychobiology

PSY 2700 Social Psychology

 B. Advanced courses: 9 hours

 With the approval of a Department advisor, the student must select 9 hours of Psychology courses numbered 3000-4990. It should be noted that no more than a total of 4 hours of Research Practicum (PSY 4100), Independent Study (PSY 4990), and/or Independent Research (PSY 4910) may be included.

 Religious Studies

(Administered by the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies)

 John Sarnecki, Chair

 Degrees Offered: Religious Studies offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

 All students majoring in Religious Studies must take a minimum of 30 hours in Religious Studies plus 18 hours of related courses. The course requirements for the major are as follows:

 A. Required courses (6 hrs.):

REL 2000 Intro. to Religion REL 3570 Philosophy of Religion

 B. Distribution Requirements (12 hrs.)

At least one course must be taken in each of the three areas listed below. The fourth course can be chosen from any of the three groups. At least one course must be taken at 3000-4000 level. The student may petition their advisor to have other courses substituted for the list below in fulfillment of the distribution requirement.

 1. Group One:

 REL 2310, Old Testament/Tanakh, 3 hours

REL 2330, New Testament, 3 hours

REL 2350, Authority and the Bible, 3 hours

REL 2410, Intro. to Christian Thought, 3 hours

REL 3420, Christian Ethical Perspectives, 3 hours

REL 3080, Jewish Biblical Studies, 3 hours

REL 3670, Christian Ritual and Worship, 3 hours

 2. Group Two:

 REL 2300, Understanding Monotheism, 3 hours

REL 2980, Intro. to Islam, 3 hours

REL 3350, Qur’an and Hadith, 3 hours

REL 3580, Cont. Issues in Islam, 3 hours

 3. Group Three:

 REL 3500, Eastern Thought, 3 hours

REL 3520, Zen Philosophy, 3 hours

 C. Focal Area/Electives (12 hrs.)

 Students can choose courses around a desired focal area (e.g., Christian studies, Islamic Studies, Religion and Literature, Religion in America, Science and Religion) or some other area of interest to be determined in consultation with the Religious Studies advisor. At least 6 hours of these electives must be taken at the 4000 level.

 D. Related Courses (18 hrs.)

As part of the general College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences requirements, the student must take 18 hours of related courses outside the Religions Studies program that have been approved by the student’s advisor.  A minimum of 9 of these hours must be taken at the 3000-level or above.  A Minor in another department may be used to satisfy the related courses requirement.

 Sociology

 Rubin Patterson, Chair

Angela Siner, Undergraduate Adviser

 Degrees Offered: Sociology offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major in Sociology

 The undergraduate major of 33 hours must include the following:

 SOC 2000 ProSeminar in Sociology I, 1 hour

SOC 3270 Social Research Methods, 3 hours

SOC 3290 Social Statistics, 3 hours

SOC 4000 ProSeminar in Sociology II, 2 hours

SOC 4040 Classical Theory, 3 hours

 21 additional elective hours of sociology courses, at least 15 of which must be at the 3000 or 4000 level.

 Students should discuss their personal and professional interests with the undergraduate adviser before selecting elective courses to complete the major.

 Related Hours

 The requirement of 18 related hours is met with electives taken from at least four of the following disciplines: Africana Studies, Anthropology, Communications, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology and Women's and Gender Studies. Fifteen of these hours must be taken at the 3000 or 4000 level. Students may not take P/NC in major or related courses.

 Honors in Sociology

 Qualified juniors and seniors may apply to work for honors in sociology. The following are requirements for entrance into the Honors Program in sociology:

 A. Admission

 3.3 minimum GPA in sociology courses

Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0

Completion of 12 hours of sociology courses; and

Qualification as a sociology major

 B. Requirements

 A student must complete nine hours of independent work in sociology. During the final semester before graduation, the student must complete an honors paper. The honors topic and paper are to be developed in close conjunction with a faculty adviser. Students should discuss their special interests with faculty members or with the honors adviser, who will help identify an appropriate faculty member to guide the honors work.

 Undergraduate Minor in Sociology

 Requirements for the undergraduate minor must include 21 hours configured as follows:

SOC 3270 Social Research Methods, 3 hours

SOC 3290 Social Statistics, 3 hours

SOC 4040 Classical Theory, 3 hours

 12 additional elective hours of sociology courses at the 3000 or 4000 level.

 Urban Studies

Interdisciplinary Major

 Carter Wilson, Adviser

 Degrees Offered: Urban Studies offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major in Urban Studies

 Degree Requirements

The Urban Studies program, totaling 48 credit hours, is an interdepartmental major with emphasis on urban-oriented courses in economics, geography, history, political science, and sociology. Its purpose is to provide a broadly based educational foundation for understanding the impact and scope of urbanization so that students will be suitably educated to pursue graduate or professional academic programs or to assume positions in urban-related employment.

 The following course work is required:

 One core course from each of these five fields (15 hours): ECON 3600; GEPL 3710; HIST 3270 or 3280; PSC 3310; SOC 2410, 4440 or 4450

 Four additional core courses from those listed (12 hours): ECON 4050; GEPL 4530, 3460; HIST 3250, 3400, 3410; PSC 2300; SOC 3600, 3640, 
4340, 4610.

 One course in statistics (3 hours): ECON 2640, PSC 3110 or SOC 3290.4.

 Courses in fields related to Urban Studies (18 hours).

 Women’s and Gender Studies

Interdisciplinary Major

 Charlene Gilbert, Chair and Adviser

 Degrees Offered: Women’s and Gender Studies offers a program for a bachelor of arts.

 Requirements for the Undergraduate Major in Women’s and Gender Studies

 Major, B. A. 31 hours (28 hours if double-major)

 Core Requirements: 16 hours

 WGST 3010 Issues in Women's Studies, 3 hours

WGST 4870 Feminisms (Feminist Theory), 3 hours

WGST 4890 Research & Methodologies, 4 hours

WGST 4900 Senior Seminar, 3 hours

WGST 4940 Praxis, 1-3 hours

 Electives: 15 hours (12 hours if double-major)

 All cross-listed WGST classes or courses with WGST numbers (that are not core-classes) count as WGST electives. In some cases, where relevant, courses with other department alpha-codes may count as electives at the discretion of the adviser or chair.

 Concentration in Law and Social Thought

 Undergraduates in women’s and gender studies who wish to study legal ideas, institutions, and procedures from the perspective of gender may pursue a concentration in law and social thought by taking the following: LST 2010, 2500 (2 hours), and 4900 in partial fulfillment of the women’s and gender studies major electives, and LST 4940 (3 to 6 hours) to satisfy the women’s and gender studies internship requirement.

 Honors in Women’s and Gender Studies

 A student majoring in women’s and gender studies who is seeking departmental honors should make formal application near the end of the sophomore year. The following requirements must be met in order to earn the departmental honors designation at the time of graduation: minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3 overall and 3.5 in WGST courses; WGST 4910 Thesis for three hours (including oral examination by a departmental honors committee); and two advanced WGST 3000- to 4000-level elective courses for honors credit.

 Minor in Women’s and Gender Studies: 21 hours

 Core Requirements: 10 hours

 WGST 3010 Issues in Women's Studies, 3 hours

WGST 4870 Feminisms (Feminist Theory), 3 hours

WGST 4890 Research & Methodologies, 4 hours

 Electives: 12 hours

 All cross-listed WGST classes or courses with WGST numbers (that are not core-classes) count as WGST electives. In some cases, where relevant, courses with other department alpha-codes may count as electives at the discretion of the adviser or chair.


College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences Faculty


 

 Department of Communication

 James B. Benjamin, 1986, professor and Associate Dean
B.S., Dakota State College; M.A., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

 James Ferris, 2008, Associate professor and Ability Center of Greater Toledo Endowed Chair in Disability Studies
B.A., Marquette University; M.A., University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

Paul A. Fritz, 1978, Associate professor and Chair
B.A., Capital University; M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

 Paulette D. Kilmer, 1997, professor
B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin; M.A., University of Kansas; Ph.D., University of Illinois

 Richard J. Knecht, 1971, professor
B.S., University of Dayton; M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

 Jacqueline Layng, 1997, professor
B.A., M.A., Ed.D., Northern Illinois University

Paul A. Many, 1980, professor
B.A., St. John’s University; M.A., The Ohio State University; M.F.A., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Ohio University

 Brian A. Patrick, 2001, Associate professor
B.A., M.A., University of Detroit; Ph.D., University of Michigan

Donald E. Reiber, 1979, Associate professor
B.A., M.A., The Ohio State University

Sumitra Srinivasan, 2006, Assistant professor
B.Sc., M.A., The University of Madras; M.S., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Georgia State University

David E. Tucker, 1987, Associate professor
B.A., Wittenberg University; M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Lecturers

Amy Capwell-Burns, 2003, lecturer
B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.A., Cleveland State University; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Dee Drummond, 2007, lecturer
B.A., The University of Toledo; M.A., Michigan State University

Fatima A. Shousher, 2004, lecturer
B.A., University of Toledo; M.A., Bowling Green State University

 David M. Strukel, 2008, lecturer
B.A., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Kent State University; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Emeritus Faculty

Carlton O. DeFosse, 1979, professor emeritus, 1999
B.S., M.S., Western Illinois University; Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Bernice C. Marti, 1969, professor emeritus, 1983
B.A., M.A., Michigan State University; Ed.D., The University of Toledo

Norbert Mills, 1974, Associate professor emeritus, 2005
B.A. Winona State College; M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Charles G. Russell, 1975, professor emeritus, 1999
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Southern Illinois University

Ethel M. Wilcox, 1972, professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., Southern Oregon College; M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Department of Economics

 Olugbenga Ajilore, 2003, Associate professor
B.A., U.C. Berkeley, Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University

Mir Ali, 2007, Assistant professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Stony Brook University, NY

Aliaksandr Amialchuk, 2007, Assistant professor
B.A., Hrodno State University; M.A., National University Kyiv-Mohyla Academy; Ph.D., University of Houston

David C. Black, 1990, Associate professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York - Buffalo

Gene Hsin Chang, 1989, professor
B.A., Ph.D., Fudan University; M.A., University of California - Berkeley; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan

Larry Cook, 2006, lecturer
B.A., M.A., The University of Toledo

Michael R. Dowd, 1989, Associate professor and Chair
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York - Buffalo

Kevin Egan, 2005, Associate professor
B.A., Central College; Ph.D., Iowa State University

Kristen Keith, 1994, Associate professor
B.A., University of Montana; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

John E. Murray, 1994, professor and undergraduate Adviser
B.A., Oberlin College; M.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Oleg Smirnov, 2006, Associate professor
B.S. Novosibirsk State University; M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D., West Virginia University

Emeritus Faculty

Alan Gleason, 1970, professor emeritus, 1984
A.B., Princeton University; M.A., University of Rochester; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Julius Gylys, 1967, professor emeritus, 1993
B.S., M.B.A., University of Detroit; M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University

Michael Magura, 1969, professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., St. Vincent College; M.A., Ph.D., Boston College

Raj Roy, 1963, professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., M.A., Calcutta University; Ph.D., Wayne State University

Frederick Tank, 1970, Associate professor emeritus, 1999
B.B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., The University of Toledo; Ph.D., Wayne State University

 Steven Weiss, 1968, professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado

Calman R. Winegarden, 1962, research professor emeritus, 1989
B.S., American University; M.A., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University

Donald J. Yankovic, 1968, professor emeritus, 1989
B.A., Monmouth College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

Department of English Language and Literature

 
Thomas E. Barden
, 1976, professor and Dean of the Honors College
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia

C. Jane Bradley, 1990, professor
B.A., University of Tennessee; M.A., Syracuse University; M.F.A., Vermont College

Douglas W. Coleman, 1989, professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida

Daniel Compora, 1993, Associate professor
A.S., Monroe County Community College; B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

 Anthony Edgington, 2005, Associate professor
B.A., University of Pittsburg; M.A. Slippery Rock University; Ph.D., University of Louisville

David L. Erben, 1997, Assistant professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of South Florida

 Christina M. Fitzgerald, 2003, Associate professor
B.A., Columbia University; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

 William N. Free, 1966, professor
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Yale University

 Timothy Geiger, 1997, professor, Associate Chair
B.A., West Chester University of Pennsylvania; M.F.A., University of Alabama

 Melissa Valiska Gregory, 2002, Associate professor
B.A., College of Wooster; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University

 Joel A. Lipman, 1975, professor
B.S., J.D., University of Wisconsin; M.A., State University of New York - Buffalo

 Sara Lundquist, 1993, Associate professor and Chair
B.A., Boston University; B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University; Ph.D., Boston College

 Andrew Mattison, 2005, Associate professor
A.B., Vassar College, M.A., Ph.D., Brandeis University

 Carmen L. Phelps, 2008, Associate professor
B.A./B.S., University of Kansas; M.A., Chicago State University; Ph.D., George Washington University

 Melinda Reichelt, 1997, professor
B.A., Anderson University; M.A., Ph.D., Purdue University

 Russell J. Reising, 1994, professor
B.A., M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., Northwestern University

 Parama Sakar, 2009, Assistant professor
B.A., Presidency College, India; M.A., Jadavpur University, India; Ph.D., Michigan State University

 Barbara Schneider, 2001, Associate professor and Associate Dean, College of Innovative Learning
B.A., Gonzaga University; M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University

 Skaidrite Stelzer, 1985, Assistant professor
B.A., M.A., Western Michigan University; Ph.D., Kent State University

 Benjamin Stroud, 2011, Assistant professor
B.A., University of Texas, Austin; M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan

 Roberta M. Thornton, 1982, Assistant professor
B.S., M.A., Central Michigan University

 Robert S. Turley, 1989, Associate professor
B.A., Oral Roberts University; M.A., University of Tulsa; Ph.D., Florida State University

 Matthew H. Wikander, 1987, professor
B.A., Williams College; B.A., M.A., Cambridge University; Ph.D., University of Michigan

 Emeritus and Superannuate Faculty

Samir Abu-Absi, 1968, professor emeritus, 2006
B.A., American University of Beirut; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University

Harriet F. Adams, 1972, Associate professor emeritus, 2000
A.B., M.A., Bryn Mawr College; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

 Rane R. Arroyo, 1997, professor
B.A., M.A., University of Illinois - Springfield; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

 John W. Boening, 1969, professor emeritus, 2006
B.A., Pace College; M.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Indiana University

 David Cheney, 1965, professor emeritus, 1992
B.A., M.A., University of Utah; M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of Iowa

 Lawrence J. Dessner, 1969, professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University

 Ruth Friedman, 1968, professor emeritus, 1985
B.Ed., M.A., The University of Toledo

Alfonso J. Grande, 1964, professor emeritus, 1990
B.A., M.A., Seton Hall University

 E. Richard Gregory Jr., 1967, professor emeritus, 1992
B.A., The University of Texas; M.A., Rice University; Ph.D., University of Oregon

 James K. Larson, 1965, Associate professor emeritus, 1993
B.A., M.A., Columbia University

 Clarence B. Lindsay Jr., 1971, professor emeritus, 2009
B.A., Illinois State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

 William McDonald Jr., 1955, professor emeritus, 1993
B.A., M.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Northwestern University

 Barbara J. McKinney, 1970, Assistant professor emeritus, 1993
B.A., Colorado State College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

 Michael Manheim, 1961, professor emeritus, 1987
B.A., Columbia College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University

 Wallace D. Martin, 1961, professor emeritus, 1986
B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of London

 Carol Nelson-Burns, Associate professor emeritus, 2007
B.A., Mount Union College; M.A., Youngstown State University; Ph.D., University of Toledo

 Jon F. Patton, 1968, Associate professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., Kent State University; M.A., University of Oregon; Ph.D., Ohio University

 Robert S. Rudolph, 1965, professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

 Dorothy Siegel, 1977, Associate professor emeritus, 2010
B.A., Brandeis University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 David Q. Smith, 1967, Associate professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., Columbia University; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of Illinois

 Elizabeth Steele, 1968, professor emeritus, 1981
B.A., Butler University; M.A., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Noel Stock, 1969, professor emeritus, 1991

Guy A. Szuberla, 1969, professor emeritus, 1999
A.B., Purdue University; M.A., Roosevelt University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Herbert P. Zornow, 1961, Associate professor emeritus, 1989
B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Yale University

Lecturers

Elliot Adams, 2008, lecturer
B.A., M.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Marykay Bryan, 2004, lecturer
B.A., M.A., The University of Akron

Paul Conner, 2007, lecturer
B.S., Indiana University Southeast; M.A., University of Louisville

Deborah Coulter-Harris, 2007, lecturer
B.A., Fitchburg State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Toledo

Michelle Davidson, 2004, lecturer
B.A., M.A., The University of Toledo

Michael S. Dubose, 2005, lecturer
B.A., M.A., University of North Florida, Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

 Michael A. Hiser, 1990, senior lecturer
B.A., M.A., The University of Toledo

 Susan E. Hoehing, 1989, senior lecturer
B.A., Georgetown University; M.A., The University of Toledo

 Robert S. Imbur, 2005, lecturer
B.A., M.F.A., University of Notre Dame

 Kevin W. Jett, 2003, lecturer
B.A., M.A., Indiana State; Ph.D., The University of Toledo

 Rosemary Johnson-Kurek, 2003, lecturer
B.A., M.A., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., The University of Toledo

 Laura S. Keller, 2005, lecturer
B.A., M.A., The University of Toledo

 Kyle Minor, lecturer
B.A., Anderson University; M.A., Antioch;            
M.F.A., The Ohio State University

 Stephanie J. Moldawsky, 2003, lecturer
B.A., M.A., The University of Toledo

 Shari L. O’Brien, 1988, senior lecturer
B.A., The University of Toledo; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan; J.D., The University of Toledo

 Sabrina Peters-Whitehead, 2004, lecturer
B.A., Carson-Newman College, M.A., Virginia Polytechnic and State University, Ph.D., Texas Tech University

 Michael V. Piotrowski, 1988, senior lecturer
B.A., Siena Heights College; M.A., The University of Toledo

 Patricia M. Reid, 1991, senior lecturer
B.A., State University of New York - Plattsburg; M.A., State University of New York - Binghamton

 Linda A. Schuller, 1989, senior lecturer
B.A., Kenyon College; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

 Suzanne E. Smith, 1989, senior Lecturer
B.A., State University of New York - Brockport; M.A., The University of Toledo

 Mary B. VanNess, 1989, senior lecturer
B.A., M.A., The University of Toledo

 Paul W. Wise, 2004, lecturer
B.A., Northern Michigan University, M.A., Bowling Green State University, Ph.D., Michigan State University

 Sara J. Yaklin, 2004, lecturer
B.A., Hiram College; M.A., University of Toledo

 
Department of Foreign Languages

 An Chung Cheng, 1998, Associate professor
B.A., Fu Jen Catholic University; M.A., Ohio University; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign

 Friederike Emonds, 1994, Associate professor
M.A., Washington University; Ph.D., University of California - Davis

 Ruth Ann Hottell, 1988, professor
B.A., Western Kentucky University; M.A., University of Louisville; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign

 Oscar Lepeley, 1996, Associate professor
B.A., Universidad de Santiago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign

 Juan Martin, 1994, Associate professor
B.A., Complutense University of Madrid; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California

 Linda Rouillard, 2001, Associate professor
B.A., M.A.T., University of Vermont; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

 Gaby Semaan, 2007, Associate professor
B.A., Lebanese University; M.A., The University of Toledo; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

 Kathleen Thompson-Casado, 1993, Associate professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

 Emeritus Faculty

Burley D. Channer, 1970, professor emeritus of German, 1993
B.A., University of Kansas; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

 Andrew M. Chermak, 1965, professor emeritus of French, 1993
B.A., LaSalle College

 Richard M. Krill, 1968, professor emeritus of classics, 1992
A.B., A.M., John Carroll University; Ph.D., St. Louis University

 Bonnie Mestre, 1966, professor emeritus of Spanish, 1983
B.A., B.Ed., The University of Toledo; M.A., Purdue University

 Ernesto Moreno, 1966, professor emeritus of Spanish, 1982
Doctor of Pedagogy, University of Havana; M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

 Juergen G. Mudrow, 1966, professor emeritus of German, 1993
B.S., Utah State University; M.A., University of Minnesota

 Guessler M. Normand, 1970, professor emeritus of French, 1999
Diplome, Universite d’Aix - Marseille; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kentucky

 Orlando M. Reyes-Cairo, 1969, professor emeritus of Spanish, 1989
B.A., University of South Dakota; M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., University of Michigan

 Timothy M. Scanlan, 1970, professor emeritus of French, 1999
B.A., University of Akron; M.A., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University

 Uta I. Schaub, 1969, professor emeritus of German, 1999
Staatsexamen, University of Heidelberg; Assessorexamen, Studienseminar Heidelberg; Ph.D., Rice University

 Antonio Varela, 1982, Associate professor of Spanish
B.A., San Francisco State University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University

 Lecturers

 Katherine Best, 2004, lecturer
B.S., M.A., Bowling Green State University

 Kimberlie Colson, 2007, lecturer
B.A., Florida A&M; M.A., Purdue University

 María Contreras, 2008, lecturer
B.A., University of Chihauhau, Mexico; M.A. University of Toledo

 Warren Dick, 2003, lecturer
B.A., M.A., George Washington University; Ph.D., Ohio State

University

Joseph Y. Hara, 1990, lecturer
B.A., Meiji Gakain University; Th.D., Lexington Theological Seminary

 Michael A. Kistner, 1994, lecturer
B.A., M.A., Bowling Green State University

 Mirta Parodi, 2007, lecturer
B.A., Universidad de la Republica (Montevideo); M.A., The University of Toledo

 Deirdre Pettet, 2004, lecturer
B.A., Mills College; M.A., Yale University

 Laurie Puszczewicz, 2005, lecturer
B.A., M.A., The University of Toledo

 Cheryl Wessel, 2003, lecturer
B.A., Luther College; M.A., The University of Toledo

 Department of Geography and Planning

 Bhuiyan Alam, 2006 Assistant professor
B.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology; M.S., Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University

 Frank J. Calzonetti, 2000, professor and vice provost for government affairs
B.A., M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma

 
Kevin Czajkowski,
1998, professor
B.S., State University of New York at Oneonta; Ph.D., University of Michigan

 Daniel J. Hammel, 2005, Associate professor
B.A., Kansas State University, M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

 Patrick Lawrence, 1999, professor
B.S., University of Guelph; M.A., Ph.D., University of Waterloo

 Peter S. Lindquist, 1988, Associate professor and Chair
B.S., University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire; M.S.L.A., University of Wisconsin - Madison; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

 David J. Nemeth, 1989, professor
B.A., M.A., California State University - Northridge; Ph.D., University of California - Los Angeles

 Neil Reid, 1991, Associate professor and director of the Urban Affairs Center
B.A., M.A., University of Glasgow; M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., Arizona State University

 M. Beth Schlemper, 2008, Assistant professor
B.A., M.A., University of Missouri Columbia, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin Madison

 Sujata Shetty, 2005, Associate professor
B Arch. School of Planning and Architecture (New Delhi), MUP, Ph.D., University of Michigan

 Emeritus Faculty

 Basil Collins, 1967, professor emeritus, 1991
B.A., University of Ireland; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan; M.A., The University of Toledo

 Eugene N. Franckowiak, 1968, professor emeritus, 1993
B.A., Wayne State University; M.A., University of Kansas; Ph.D., University of Michigan

 Frank E. Horton, 1988, professor emeritus and president emeritus, 1999
B.S., Western Illinois University; M.S., Ph.D., Northwestern University

 Donald W. Lewis, 1966, professor emeritus, 1986
B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

 William A. Muraco, 1971, professor emeritus, 1999
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

 
Department of History

Charles Beatty-Medina, 2003, Associate professor
B.A., Hunter College of The City University of New York; M.A., Ph.D., Brown University

 Diane F. Britton, 1986, professor
B.A., M.A., University of Idaho; Ph.D., Washington State University

 Cynthia Jo Ingham, 2008, Assistant professor
B.A., Mary Washington College; Ph.D., University of Kansas

 Michael Jakobson, 1991, professor
B.A., M.A., Tel Aviv University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

 Peter Limbaugh, 1994, professor
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Warwick

 Todd Michney, 2011, Assistant professor
B.A., Case Western Reserve University, M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

 William J. O’Neal, 1969, professor and Chair
B.A., St. Maynard College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of Missouri

 Roberto Padilla, 2009, Assistant professor
B.A., M.A., San Francisco State University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

 Emeritus Faculty

Glenn J. Ames, 1988, professor emeritus, 2011
B.A., University of Rhode Island; M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

 Richard E. Boyer, 1964, professor emeritus, 1993
B.S.Ed., M.A., Northeast Missouri State College; Ph.D., University of Missouri

 Lorin Lee Cary, 1968, professor emeritus, 1989
B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

 Alfred A. Cave, 1973, professor emeritus, 2007
B.A., Linfield College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida

 Charles N. Glaab, 1968, professor emeritus, 2006
B.Ph., M.A., University of North Dakota; Ph.D., University of Missouri

 William D. Hoover, 1968, professor emeritus, 2006
B.A., Muskingum College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan

 Marvin L. Michael Kay, 1971, professor emeritus, 1992
B.A., Maryville College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

William H. Longton, 1968, professor emeritus, 2003
B.A., University of Florida; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina

Ronald Lora, 1967, professor emeritus, 2006
B.S., Bluffton College; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Theodore Natsoulas, 1980, professor emeritus, 2005
B.A., City College of New York; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Syracuse University

Bogdan C. Novak, 1961, professor emeritus, 1990
L.L.M., State University of Ljubljana; M.A., Loyola University; Ph.D., University of Chicago

Roger D. Ray, 1969, professor emeritus, 2006
B.A., Baylor University; Ph.D., Duke University

Ivan C. Scott, 1968, professor emeritus, 1984
B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Robert F. Smith, 1969, Distinguished University Professor
B.A., M.A., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Arthur R. Steele, 1957, professor emeritus, 1979
B.A., University of California; M.A., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., Duke University

Larry D. Wilcox, 1968, professor emeritus, 2009
B.A., Ohio University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia

 Lecturers

Robert McCollough,
2008, lecturer
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Toledo

Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies

Ovamir Anjum, 2009, Assistant professor, Imam Khattab Endowed Chair of Islamic Studies
B.E., University of Wisconsin-Madison; M.A., University of Chicago; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison

Charles V. Blatz, 1989, professor
B.A., University of Cincinnati; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan

James Campbell, 1982, Distinguished University Professor, Director of American Studies
B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York - Stony Brook

Jeanine Diller, 2010, Assistant Professor
B.A., Wheaton College; M.A. Syracuse University; Ph.D., University of Michigan

Peter Feldmeier, 2011, Thomas and Margaret Murray & James J. Bacik Professor of Catholic Studies
B.A., Purdue University; M.A., University of St. Thomas; M.Div., St. Paul Seminary; Ph.D. Graduate Theological Union

Madeline Muntersbjorn, 1994, Associate professor
B.A., Carleton College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

Benjamin Pryor, 2000, Associate professor and Dean of College of Innovative Learning
B.A., The University of Redlands; M.A., Claremont Graduate School; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

Susan M. Purviance, 1988, professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California - Santa Barbara

John Sarnecki, 2002, Associate professor and Chair
B.A., M.A., University of Calgary, Ph.D., Rutgers University

James Waddell, 2010, Philip Markowicz Visiting Assistant Professor of Jewish Biblical Studies
B.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan

Emeritus Faculty

George P. Guthrie, 1961, professor emeritus, 1988
A.B., D.B., Ph.D., University of Chicago

Thomas C. Mayberry, 1969, professor emeritus, 1989
B.A., M.A., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., University of Washington

Ramakrishna Puligandla, 1966, professor emeritus, 1993
B.S., M.Sc., Andhra University; M.S., Purdue University; A.M., University of South Dakota; Ph.D., Rice University

Stephen S. Tigner, 1965, professor emeritus, 1990
B.A., University of Rochester; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan

Lecturer

Ben Grazzini, 2010, Lecturer
B.A., Penn State University; M.A., Ph.D., The New School of Social Research

Department of Political Science and Public Administration

Lynn W. Bachelor, 1988, Associate professor
B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.A., University of New Hampshire; Ph.D., University of Chicago

Jetsabe Caceres, 2011, Assistant professor
B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida

David H. Davis, 1989, professor
B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University

Mark E. Denham, 1989, Associate professor and Chair, Director of European Studies and Global Studies
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.Div., Boston University; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Renee J. Heberle, 1997, Associate professor, Co-Director of Law and Social Thought
B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Samuel P. Nelson, 2001, Associate professor
B.A., Northwestern University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison

Taylor, Jami, 2009, Assistant professor
B.A., M.P.A., Old Dominion University; M.L.I.S., University of North Carolina, Greensboro; Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Sunday E. Ubokudom, 1995, Associate professor
B.S., Oklahoma State University; M.P.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas

Carter A. Wilson, 1983, professor, Director of Urban Studies
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University

Emeritus and Superannuate Faculty

Abid A. Al-Marayati, 1968, professor emeritus, 1989
B.S., M.A., Bradley University; Ph.D., New York University

Norman Blume, 1956, professor emeritus, 1983
B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Winfield S. Bollinger, 1967, professor emeritus, 1993
B.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University

Hugh F. Hinton, 1975, Associate professor, 2008
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas

George P. Jan, 1968, professor emeritus, 1993
B.A., National Chengchi University; M.A., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., New York University

James W. Lindeen, 1967, professor emeritus, 2009
B.A., University of Omaha; M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska

Ronald R. Randall, 1970, professor emeritus, 2006
B.A., University of Montana; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin

Willard W. Smith, 1961, professor emeritus, 1989
B.A., Miami University; M.S.G.M., University of Denver

Robert S. Sullivant, 1973, professor emeritus, 1990
A.B., M.A., University of California; Ph.D., University of Chicago

Karl O. Vezner, 1971, professor emeritus, 1992
B.A., Valparaiso University; M.A., American University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina

George L. Willis, 1969, professor emeritus, 1983
B.A., Ph.D., Indiana University; M.A., University of North Carolina

David S. Wilson, 1970, Associate professor emeritus, 2010
B.A., Dartmouth College; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University

Department of Psychology

Wesley A. Bullock, 1988, Associate professor
B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma

Michael Caruso, 1988, Associate professor
B.A., M.A., The University of Akron

Stephen D. Christman, 1989, professor
B.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of California - Berkeley

Andrew L. Geers, 2001, Associate professor
B.A., University of Cincinnati; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio University

Henry E. Heffner, 1987, professor
B.A., Trinity College; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University

Rickye S. Heffner, 1987, professor
B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University

Joseph D. Hovey, 1997, professor
B.A., University of California - Los Angeles; M.A. Ph.D., University of Michigan

John D. Jasper, 2001, Assistant professor and Chair
B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa

Yueh-Ting Lee, 2007, professor
B.A. Southern University, China; M.S., Beijing Normal; Ph.D., State University of New York, Stony Brook

Kamala London, 2005, Associate professor
B.A., Grand Valley State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wyoming

Gregory J. Meyer, 2003, professor
B.S., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign; M.S., Ph.D., Loyola University in Chicago

Joni L. Mihura, 1996, Associate professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University

Rose, Jason, 2009, Assistant professor
B.A., Purdue University; Ph.D., University of Iowa

Laura D. Seligman, 2001, Associate professor
B.A., State University of New York at Oneonta; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Mojisola F. Tiamiyu, 1997, Associate professor
B.Sc., Obafemi Awolowo University; M.Sc., University of Jos; Ph.D., University of Toronto

Emeritus Faculty

Harvard L. Armus, 1960, professor, 2009
A.B., New York University; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., State University of Iowa

Jeanne Brockmyer, 1995, professor emeritus, 2010
B.A., Bucknell University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina

Robert J. Burns, 1946, professor emeritus, 1982
B.B.A., M.A., The University of Toledo; Ph.D., University of Michigan

David M. Del Castillo, 1968, professor emeritus, 1993
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Robert K. Elliott, 1978, professor emeritus, 2006
B.A., University of California - Santa Cruz; M.A., Ph.D., University of California - Los Angeles

William E. Gumenik, 1963, professor emeritus, 1988
B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., New York University

Robert A. Haaf, 1969, professor emeritus, 2004
B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D., University of Connecticut

Walter McKeever, 1990, professor emeritus, 2003
B.A., Miami University; Ph.D., University of Rochester

Albert B. Palmer Jr., 1965, professor emeritus, 1993
B.A., Heidelberg College; M.S., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University

Alice H. Skeens, 1963, Associate professor emeritus and Dean emeritus, 2011
B.S., Concord College; M.A., West Virginia University; Ed.D., The University of Toledo

Stefan Slak, 1967, professor emeritus, 1993
Diplome, Universite de Paris; M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., Wayne State University

Peg Hull Smith, 1983, Associate professor emeritus, 2007
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Julian Wohl, 1961, professor emeritus, 1986
A.B., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., University of Nebraska

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Patricia F. Case, 2004, Associate professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University

Barbara K. Chesney, 1989, Associate professor
B.A., Mount St. Mary’s College; M.A., Eastern Michigan University; M.P.H., Ph.D., University of Michigan

Barbara Coventry, 1991, Associate professor
B.A., Eureka College; M.S., Illinois State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois

Dwight N. Haase, 2007, Assistant professor
B.S.W., Purdue University; M.A., Clark University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Yoon Jung-Lee, 2011, Assistant professor
B.A., M.A., Seoul National University, South Korea; Ph.D., Stanford University

Willie L. McKether, 2006, Assistant professor
B.A., Grand Valley State University; M.B.A., Saginaw Valley State University; M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University

Seamus P. Metress, 1969, professor
B.S., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Indiana University

Elias T. Nigem, 1976, Associate professor, Director of Middle East Studies
A.A., Los Angeles Valley College; B.A., M.A., California State University; Ph.D., Utah State University

Mark Sherry, 2005, Associate professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The University of Queensland

Rubin Patterson, 1992, Associate professor and Chair, Director of Africana Studies
B.S., Florida State University; M.S., George Washington University; Ph.D., Howard University

Angela Siner, 1989, instructor
B.A., Grambling State University; M.A., University of Southwest Louisiana

Jerry Van Hoy, 2000, Associate professor, Co-Director of Law and Social Thought, Director of Master of Liberal Studies
B.A., University of California - Santa Cruz; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University

Emeritus Faculty

Nadim Bitar, 1969, professor emeritus, 1990
B.A., M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., Sorbonne University of Paris

Robert E. Forman, 1969, professor emeritus, 1986
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Mary Louise Glen, 1967, professor emeritus, 2006
B.A., Wayne State University; M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., The University of Toledo

Sidney J. Kaplan, 1962, professor emeritus, 1989
B.A., M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., Washington State University

James A. King, 1971, professor emeritus, 1999
B.A., St. Procopius College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame

Marietta Morrissey, 1989, professor, 2010
B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University

Neil M. Palmer, 1967, professor emeritus, 1991
B.S., B.A., M.A., The University of Texas; Ph.D., University of Iowa

Ruth E. Searles, 1969, professor emeritus, 1991
B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan

David M. Stothers, 1972, professor, 2011
B.A., McMaster University; M.A., University of Toronto; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University

 Department of Women’s and Gender Studies

Jamie Barlowe, 1990, professor and Dean, College of Languages, Literature, and Social Sciences
B.A., Indiana University; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Charlene Gilbert, 2007, professor and Chair
B.A., Yale University; M.F.A., Temple University

Asma M. Abdel Halim, 2004, Associate professor
LL.B., University of Khartoum; MAIA, Ph.D., Ohio University

 
Sharon Barnes
, 2001, Associate professor
B.A., Sienna College; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Emeritus Faculty

Patricia A. Groves, 1979, professor emeritus, 2006
B.A., Bowling Green State University; M.S.W., University of Michigan; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Patricia Murphy, 1999, professor emeritus, 2008
B.A., University of Minnesota; M.S., St. Cloud University; Ph.D., Union Institute and University


 

 

Last Updated: 3/23/15