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COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCE AND HUMAN SERVICE


Administration
Academic Departments
Degrees Offered
Department of Criminal Justice
Department of Health and Recreation Professions
Department of Kinesiology
Department of Military Science and Leadership
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences
Department of School Psychology, Legal Specialization, and Counselor Education
Faculty

Find a Major or Degree in the College of Health Science and Human Services

Administration

Beverly J. Schmoll, dean
Health and Human Services Building Room 3302                           
Phone: 419.530.5452
beverly.schmoll@utoledo.edu                                                
Fax: 419.530.5540

Barbaranne Benjamin, associate dean for academic affairs
Health and Human Services Building Room 2400H        
Phone: 419.530.2757
barbaranne.benjamin@utoledo.edu                                      
Fax: 419.530.5541

Barbara Kopp-Miller, associate dean for research and quality
Health and Human Services Building Room 2400E         
Phone: 419.530.5308
barbara.koppmiller@utoledo.edu                                          
Fax: 419.530.5541

Sharon Periat, director of student services
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100B         
Phone: 419.530.5306
sharon.periat@utoledo.edu                                                   
Fax: 419.530.5366

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Academic Departments


Department of Criminal Justice and Social Work

Morris Jenkins, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 3000
Phone: 419.530.2313
morris.jenkins@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.2153

Mark Wintgens, academic adviser for criminal justice
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100E              
Phone: 419.530.5360
mark.wintgens@utoledo.edu  

Heather Tessler, academic adviser for social work
Health and Human Services Building room 1100A
Phone: 419.530.5360
heather.tessler@utoledo.edu

Department of Health and Recreation Professions

Joseph Dake, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 1000C        
Phone: 419.530.2767
joseph.dake@utoledo.edu                                                      
Fax: 419.530.4759

Staci Sturdivant, academic adviser for health and recreation
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100D              
Phone: 419.530.5360
staci.sturdivant@utoledo.edu

Angela DeAngelo, academic adviser for health administration
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100K
Phone: 419.530.4624
Angela.deangelo@utoledo.edu

Department of Kinesiology

Barry Scheuermann, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 2503B         
Phone: 419.530.2692
barry.scheuermann@.utoledo.edu                                         
Fax: 419.530.2477

Sandra Browning, academic adviser for exercise science and athletic training
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100D              
Phone: 419.530.5360
sandra.browning@utoledo.edu

Heather Tessler, academic adviser for respiratory care
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100A
Phone: 419.530.4462
heather.tessler@utoledo.edu

Department of Military Science and Leadership – Army ROTC

Jonathan Beasley, Chair
Health Education Center Room 2120                                
Phone: 419.530.4699
jonathan.beasley@utoledo.edu                               
Fax: 419.530.4698

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences

Michelle M. Masterson, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 2000           
Phone: 419.530.4688
michelle.masterson@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.4780

Staci Sturdivant, academic adviser
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100D              
Phone: 419.530.5360
staci.sturdivant@utoledo.edu

Department of School Psychology, Legal Specialties, and Counselor Education

Martin Ritchie, chair
Health and Human Services Building Room 3100A        
Phone: 419.530.4064
martin ritchie@utoledo.edu
Fax: 419.530.7879

Heather Tessler, academic adviser for minor in counseling program
Health and Human Services Building room 1100A
Phone: 419.530.5360
heather.tessler@utoledo.edu

Staci Sturdivant, academic adviser for paralegal studies program
Health and Human Services Building Room 1100D              
Phone: 419.530.5360
staci.sturdivant@utoledo.edu

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Degrees Offered


The college offers an array of bachelor’s degrees and post-baccalaureate certificates.  Minors in counseling, criminal justice, exercise science, forensic science investigation, legal specialties, military science, and recreation and leisure studies are available.

Admission Policies
To be admitted to the College of Health Science and Human Service at The University of Toledo, direct-from-high-school students need a minimum cumulative high school grade point average (GPA) of 2.25 or a minimum ACT score of 20.
Students not qualifying for admission to the College of Health Science and Human Service will be admitted to The University of Toledo Learning Collaborative (UTLC). Students who want to transfer from UTLC to the College of Health Science and Human Service must earn 12 hours of college-level work with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 to qualify for transfer.

Selective/Limited Admission
The following programs require an additional application for admission to their professional programs:
Athletic training
Community health
Recreation and leisure studies
Recreational therapy
Respiratory care
Social work

Requirements for Students with an Associate’s Degree
Students holding associate’s degrees from accredited colleges are encouraged to enroll in the College of Health Science and Human Service. Students, may earn a bachelor’s degree upon completion of two or more additional years of full-time study; see the adviser in the major to determine a plan of study. The following regulations apply:
1.       Students must complete the equivalent of the specified University core.
2.       In all baccalaureate programs, a minimum of 64 hours must be taken at the 2000 to 4000 levels; of these, a minimum of 32 hours must be taken at the 3000 and 4000 levels. Course work from other institutions is accepted at the level at which the course was taught at that institution.

Admission with Transfer Credit from Another Institution
Students with satisfactory academic records wishing to transfer into the College of Health Science and Human Service must meet the minimum entrance requirements of The University of Toledo. After submission of official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended and acceptance by the College of Health Science and Human Service, transfer courses are evaluated. The evaluation process must be completed before the end of the first term of attendance.
For purposes of determining GPA, grades from another institution do not transfer, but are used to calculate any honors citations. The GPA is based on the work taken while enrolled in the College of Health Science and Human Service.

Change of College

Students in good standing (minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0) who wish to change from another college within The University of Toledo to the College of Health Science and Human Service should make an appointment with a college adviser in the College of Health Science and Human Service Student Services Office to discuss the transfer and have academic records reviewed. All program requirements, including University core, must be fulfilled as specified in the catalog for the year in which the student enters the College of Health Science and Human Service. All undergraduate hours attempted and earned at the University of Toledo, as well as the GPA, will transfer.

Readmission of Former Health Science and Human Service Students

Students who have withdrawn from the College of Health Science and Human Service and The University of Toledo and have not attended any other institution in the interim may be readmitted, provided they were eligible to continue enrollment in the college at the time they discontinued attendance. Students who have been suspended from the College of Health Science and Human Service must submit a written letter of petition. Students who readmit after more than 12 consecutive months must comply with existing program requirements at the time of readmission.

Honors Program

The Honors Program in the College of Health Science and Human Service provides opportunities for challenging and individualized study for undergraduate students of unusually high ability, motivation and initiative. For admission requirements, see Admission to the University Honors Program in the General Section of this catalog.

Academic Policies

The College of Health Science and Human Service adheres to all of The University of Toledo policies and procedures. Please refer to the General Section of this catalog for academic policies governing all students enrolled at the University. In any case where University, college, departmental and/or program policies conflict, the most stringent policy applies. Students should consult with their program for a complete list of all policies and procedures specifically related to their program.

Academic Advising

The Office of Student Services in the College of Health Science and Human Service coordinates academic advising. The office’s mission is to provide quality, timely and comprehensive student services that will enhance student success in achieving academic goals. Although the ultimate responsibility for making personal and educational decisions rests with the student, his/her potential for academic success can improve considerably through relationships with the college’s advisers, who can provide assistance in identifying educational options and enhancing student potential.
Students in the College of Health Science and Human Service are assigned academic advisers by major. Essential services provided by advisers include degree requirements, career opportunities, and interpretations of college and University policies and procedures.

Student Responsibilities

Students are responsible to complete the following:

  • All first-year students must see an adviser each semester; all College of Health Science and Human Service students are strongly encouraged to see an adviser at least once a year.
  • All students must sign and date a program agreement upon declaring a major.
  • Readmit students are responsible for degree requirements in effect at the time of readmission.
  • Students are responsible for fulfilling all degree requirements.
  • Students are encouraged to meet with their academic advisers as needed for assistance.
  • Students must contact the Office of Student Services to schedule an advising appointment.


General Degree Requirements

Students in baccalaureate programs must complete a minimum of 124 hours of course work and have the proper number of credit hours as outlined in their program of study. In all baccalaureate programs, a minimum of 64 hours must be taken at the 2000 levels or above; of these, a minimum of 32 hours must be taken at the 3000 and 4000 levels.

GPA Recalculation for Repeated Courses
The College of Health Science and Human Service permits a maximum of 12 semester hours to be deleted from the GPA calculation. Students who have had their GPAs recomputed under the Academic Forgiveness Policy are not eligible for grade deletions.  Specific programs within the college may have more rigorous requirements for grade deletions of major or related courses.

Withdrawal Policy (W Grades)
The number of credit hours of W is limited to 22 hours for all undergraduate students in degree programs in the College of Health Science and Human Service. Once a student has accumulated 22 hours of W, further withdrawals will be counted as F’s in computation of the student’s GPA for the purposes of probation or suspension. In addition, students risk the loss of financial aid if they accumulate excessive hours of W.

Academic Probation and Suspension
Students with a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0 are automatically placed on probation until a cumulative GPA of 2.0 is achieved. While on probation, it is recommended students enroll for 12 or fewer credit hours. Students on probation must see an adviser.
Academic suspension means the student is prohibited from registering at The University of Toledo for a period of at least one semester. A student is subject to academic suspension if his or her GPA continues to fall below the minimum of 2.0 or if he or she fails to make sufficient progress toward attainment of the degree by accumulating excess W grades. Students may remove Incompletes while under suspension. See the General Section of this catalog for additional details on University probation and suspension policies

Academic Grievance
Students have the responsibility and right to call to the attention of a professor any course grade believed to be in error. The college grievance procedure must be initiated within 60 days of the posting of the final grade. Academic grievances must follow the procedure described below:

  • The student meets with the professor to attempt to resolve the issue.
  • If meeting with the professor does not resolve the issue, the student must discuss the issue with the department chair of the faculty member who issued the grade. The chair attempts to resolve the issue, but may not unilaterally change the grade.
  • If meeting with the chair does not resolve the issue, the student will forward the appeal to the associate dean for academic affairs of the College of Health Science and Human Service.
  • The college's Petition for Academic Grievance should be used for this purpose. The student must state the reasons for the appeal and the desired outcome. The student must meet with the associate dean to review and discuss the issue. The associate dean will attempt to resolve the issue by meeting with the appropriate faculty member, but may not unilaterally change the grade.
  • If the student wishes to continue the appeal, he/she must forward the appropriate information relative to the issue to the Student Grievance Council. Information on this process may be found in The University of Toledo Student Handbook.

Note:  If the grievance occurs during the fall or summer semester, a grievance petition must be filed with the chair of the Student Grievance Council no later than the last day of classes in the next semester. If the grievance occurs during the spring semester, a grievance petition must be filed with the chair of the Student Grievance Council no later than the last day of classes in the final summer session.

Residence Requirement

Full-time students transferring to the College of Health Science and Human Service must complete at least the final semester and 25 percent of their program of study in residence within the college. Part-time students must complete the last 12 credit hours and 25 percent of the program of study within the college.

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Department of Criminal Justice and Social Work


Morris Jenkins, chair

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
Minor in Criminal Justice
Minor in Forensic Science Investigation
Bachelor of Social Work

Criminal Justice Program

Morris Jenkins, program coordinator

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
The bachelor of science (B.S.) degree in criminal justice is designed to prepare students to enter law enforcement, corrections, probation, parole, private security, juvenile justice and related careers. In addition, the B.S. program provides preparation for students who wish to attend graduate school in criminal justice, a related field, or law school.

The undergraduate curriculum consists of a liberal arts core, criminal justice core and electives, general electives, and supporting courses from related disciplines to form an understanding of justice, (e.g. political science, public administration, sociology, history, business and social work). Because good communication and computer skills are important to the criminal justice professional and to students planning to attend graduate or law school, courses in writing, speaking and computer use are part of the curriculum. The faculty are committed not only to teaching about criminal justice systems, but also to challenging students to explore the concept of justice and to develop their own ethical paradigms. Accordingly, course work in ethics is required. Faculty members also emphasize the development of critical thinking, analytical and problem-solving skills in their instruction.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed in the criminal justice program of study chart 

Requirement

Hours

University core courses                                                              

33

Criminal justice required courses                                               

42

Criminal justice elective courses

12

Computer science/applications courses

6

Supporting course electives

9

General electives

22

Minimum total hours

124

Minimum hours at 2000/4000 level 64
Minimum hours at 3000/4000 level 32
Minimum graduation GPA 2.0

Minor in Criminal Justice

The minor in criminal justice designed to give the student an overview of the criminal justice discipline; it includes an introductory course and a foundation course in each of the four areas recommended by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (penology, policing, constitutional law, and juvenile justice). The remaining six hours give the student freedom to explore areas of interest in criminal justice.
Required:               21 hours

CRIM

1010

Criminal Justice

3

CRIM

1110

Penology

3

CRIM

1240

Policing

3

CRIM

2230

Constitutional Law

3

CRIM

2250

Juvenile Justice

3

CRIM

 

Electives at the 3000/4000 level                               

6

Minor in Forensic Science Investigation
The minor in forensic science investigation is designed to provide an overview of the importance of forensic science evidence in the criminal justice system. Students learn about the rules and procedures of evidence pertaining to admissibility of scientific and physical material; the basic methods of collection, preservation and analysis of evidence; and the methods of presentation of evidence in court.
This minor is designed for students planning to work for law enforcement agencies to better understand the importance and types of forensic science evidence in criminal investigations. It is not designed for students who plan to work in a crime laboratory or in jobs requiring in-depth scientific analysis of evidence. Those students interested in forensic science will need to obtain a degree (preferably on the graduate level) in the natural sciences.
Required: *            25 hours

BIOL

2020

Mammalian Form and Function

4

BIOL

2170

Fundamentals of Life Science II

4

BIOL

2180

Fundamentals of Life Science II Lab

1

CHEM

1100

Concepts in Chemistry

3

CHEM

1150

Concepts in Chemistry Lab

1

CRIM

2210

Criminal Investigation I

3

CRIM

2220

Laws of Evidence

3

CRIM

3290

Criminal Investigation II

3

CRIM

4940

Criminal Justice Internship

3

* Students will be responsible for meeting all of the prerequisites and corequisites for the required courses in the minor.
Prelaw Studies
No particular degree is required for admission to law school, but students interested in studying law should have good communication, logic and analytical skills and possess a fundamental understanding of government.

The criminal justice discipline, as well as other majors, provide good preparation for law school. Several faculty members in the department are graduates of law schools and are available for advising. Contact the department office for more information.

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice – Degree Program Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

ENGL 1100 or 1110 College Comp. I

3

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology

3

CRIM 1010 Criminal Justice

3

CRIM 1040 Human Relations

3

HHS 1000 Freshmen Orientation

1

Computer Science Course 

3

Total 16 hours

 

 

 

CRIM 1110 Penology

3

CRIM 1240 Policing 

3

PSC 1200 American National Govern. 

3

SOC 1010 Intro to Sociology 

3

MATH 1180 Math for Liberal Arts (or higher)

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

Sophomore Year

 

CRIM 2200 Criminal Law

 3

CRIM 2230 Constitutional Law

 3

ENGL 1130 or higher College Comp II

 3

Humanities/Fine Arts Course

 3

Elective

 3

Total 15 hours

 

 

 

CRIM 2150 Applied Psy & Crim

3

CRIM 2250 Juvenile Justice 

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Course 

3

Natural Science 

3

Elective 

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

Junior
Year

 

CRIM Electives 

6

Natural Science

3

Multicultural Course 

3

Electives 

6

Total 18 hours

 

 

 

CRIM 4100 Research Methods in CJ

3

CRIM Elective 

3

Electives 

9

Total 15 hours

 

 

Senior Year

 

CRIM 4200 Ethics in Criminal Justice 

3

CRIM 4590 Adm. of Criminal Justice 

3

Electives 

9

Total 15 hours

 

 

 

CRIM 4300 Theories of Crim. Justice 

3

CRIM Elective 

3

Electives 

6

Multicultural Course 

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

Courses are available in the summer.  Students should consult an academic adviser or the summer course schedule to develop a program of study that includes summer courses. Please note that CRIM 4590 is a capstone class required to be taken at the University of Toledo.

Social Work Program
Ann Biddlestone, program coordinator

The social work program offers a bachelor of social work degree. The undergraduate social work program is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and prepares students for entry into the beginning level of professional social work practice as generalist social workers who work in a variety of system sizes with various population groups. Graduates of the program meet the educational requirements for licensing at the Licensed Social Worker (LSW) level in the state of Ohio.

Admission Requirements
Freshmen entering The University of Toledo with the intent of majoring in social work should declare presocial work as their major until they complete the requirements to apply to the social work program and have been accepted to the social work program.
Prior to applying to the social work program, the student must have:

  • Completed 45 semester hours of course work;
  • An overall minimum GPA of 2.25; and
  • Completed SOCW 1030, 2010 and 2210 with a minimum major GPA of 2.5 and a grade no less than a C in each of these social work courses.

Admission to the social work program is selective. Students will not be permitted to enroll in social work courses at the 3000 level or higher unless they have been admitted to the social work program. Application procedures are available from advisers and in the Social Work Student Handbook available from the program office and online at www.utoledo.edu\hshs\socialwork\undergrad_program.html.

Degree Requirements for the Bachelor of Social Work
Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed in the social work program degree chart.
Social work students must enroll in BIOL 1120 as part of the natural science requirements of the College of Health Science and Human Service. Students may not take P/NC in major courses or related courses, except SOCW 4220.

Bachelor of Social Work – Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.

 

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

HHS 1000 College Orientation 

1

ENGL 1110 Composition I 

3

SOC 1010 Intro to Sociology 

3

MATH 1180 Mathematics for Liberal Arts 

3

SOCW 1030 Intro to Social Welfare 

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective 

3

Total 16 hours

 

 

 

ENGL 1130 or higher College Comp II 

3

BIOL 1120 Survey of Biology 

3

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology 

3

CMPT 1100 Comp. Inform. Applications 

3

General Elective 

4

Total 16 hours

 

 

Sophomore Year

 

PSC 1200 American National Govt. 

3

SOCW 2010 Survey of SW Profession 

3

PSY 2510 Lifespan Dev. Psychology 

3

Natural Science Elective 

3

General Elective 

4

Total 16 hours

 

 

 

ECON 1010 Intro to Economic Issues 

3

ANTH 2100 Human Society thru Film or ANTH 2800 Cultural Anthropology 

3

SOCW 2210 SW Field Experience I

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective 

3

General Elective 

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

Junior
Year

 

SOCW 3110 Social Work Practice I 

3

SOCW 3240 Human Behav– Soc Envt I 

3

SOCW 3300 Social Policy & Legislation 

3

HIST 3250 or 3260 or 3310 or 4430 

3

SOC 3290 or PSC 3110 or PSY 2100 or RESM 4100 

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

 

SOCW 3120 Social Work Interviewing 

4

SOCW 3250 Human Behavior–Soc Envt II

3

Humanities Elective 

3

WGST Elective 

3

SOCW Elective 

3

Total 16 hours

 

 

Senior
Year

 

SOCW 4010 Social Work Research 

3

SOCW 4120 SW Practice II

3

SOCW 4200 Field Lab II 

1

SOCW 4220 Field II 

5

SOC, PSY, WGST, AFST, DST Elective 

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

 

SOCW 4130 SW Practice III 

3

SOCW 4210 Field Lab III 

1

SOCW 4230 Field III 

5

SOC 4660 Racial/Ethnic Minorities/US or SOC 4670 African Americans in US 

3

General Elective 

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

Note: Entry into SOCW 4120, 4130, 4200, 4210, 4220 and 4230 requires senior standing, a minimum overall GPA of 2.25, a minimum major GPA of 2.5, a grade of C or better in all major courses, and permission of the field director.

Departmental Honors in Social Work
Qualified juniors and seniors may apply to work for honors in social work. The following are requirements for admission to the Honors Program in social work:

  • Minimum GPA of 3.3 in social work courses;
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0;
  • 12 hours completed work in social work; and
  • Qualification as a social work major.

After being admitted to the Honors Program in social work, the student must complete nine hours of independent work in social work. During the final semester before graduation, the student must pass a comprehensive examination or complete a research project. The honors topic and research project are to be developed in close conjunction with a faculty adviser. Students should discuss their special interests with faculty members or with the honors adviser who will help identify an appropriate faculty member to guide the honors work.

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Department of Health and Recreation Professions


Joseph Dake, chair

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science Community Health
Bachelor of Education in School Health Education (jointly offered with College of Education)
Bachelor of Science Health Care Administration
Bachelor of Science Health Information Administration
Bachelor of Science Recreation & Leisure Studies
Bachelor of Science Recreational Therapy

Undergraduate programs related to health and recreation professions are found in this department. Programs include academic course work and practical experiences designed to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for entry into professional careers.

Health Professions Programs

Community Health

Joseph Dake, program coordinator

The community health program is designed to prepare students to work in non-profit health organizations, in local, state and national government health agencies, or in worksite wellness.

Bachelor of Science in Community Health Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed in the community health program of study chart. 
In addition, students should complete the following requirements:

Natural Science Courses (29 hours)

Hours

(Seven hours used to satisfy University core)

 

BIOL 2150 Fundamentals of Life Sciences I 

4

BIOL 2160 Fundamentals of Life Sciences Lab I 

1

CHEM 1120 Chemistry for Life Sciences 

4

KINE 2590 Microbiology & Infectious Diseases 

4

KINE 2510 Human Anatomy 

3

KINE 2520 Human Anatomy Lab 

1

KINE 2530 Human Physiology 

3

KINE 2540 Human Physiology Lab 

1

KINE 3520 Applied Exercise Physiology 

3

KINE 3530 Applied Exercise Physiology Lab 

1

KINE 3730 Fitness Assessment and Programming 

 

2

Social Sciences (12 hours) Hours

 

Choose four courses from the following:

 

ANTH 4760 Medical Anthropology 

3

PSC 2300 Principles of State & Local Government 

3

PSC 4350 Health Care Delivery Systems 

3

PSY 2200 Abnormal Psychology 

3

PSY 2700 Social Psychology 

3

SOC 1750 Social Problems (may satisfy core soc. sci.) 

3

SOC 4100 Community Organizing & Development 

3

SOC 4160 Health & Gender 

3

SOC 4180 Medical Sociology 

3

SOC 4660 Racial & Ethnic Minorities 

3

SOC 4730 Social Psychiatry 

 

3

Skill for Community Health (9-10 hours) Hours

 

Choose three courses from the following:

 

COMM 2000 Mass Communication and Society 

3

COMM 2600 Public Presentations

3

COMM 3820 Persuasion Theory 

4

EDP 4330 Behavior Management 

3

HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology 

3

TSOC 4100 Group Processes in Education

3

Bachelor of Science in Community Health – Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.
At least 124 semester hours are required for graduation.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

HEAL 2000 Foundations for Health Ed       

3

ENGL 1110 College Composition I 

3

MATH 1180 Mathematics for Liberal Arts   

3

HEAL 1500   First Aid                                         

2

HHS 1000 College Orientation     

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective  

3

Total 15 hours

 

CHEM 1120 Chemistry for Health Sciences                          

4

ENGL 1130 or higher College Comp II                    

3

BIOL 2150   Fund. Of Life Sciences                       

4

BIOL 2160   Fund. Of Life Sciences Lab                       

1

SOC 1750   Social Problems                                

3

Total 15 hours

 

Sophomore Year

KINE 2510 Human Anatomy                                

3

KINE 2520 Human Anatomy Lab 

1

HEAL Health Elective                                  

3

HEAL 2700 Community Health                       

3

Skills/Comm Health Elective                                  

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective    

3

Total 16 hours

 

KINE 2530 Human Physiology      

3

KINE 2540 Human Physiology Lab                       

1

HEAL 2400 General Safety                                     

3

HEAL 2940 Practicum In Comm Hlth                

1

Multicultural Elective                                               

3

KINE 2590 Micro and Infectious Diseases     

3

Total 14 hours

 

Junior Year

HEAL 3500 Environmental Health            

3

KINE 3520 Appl’d Exercise Physiology    

3

KINE 3530 Appl’d Exercise Phys. Lab                       

1

Social Science Core Elective

3

Skills/Comm Health Elective                       

4

Elective                                                                                   

3

Total 17 hours

 

HEAL 3600 Prev/Control of Disease          

3

HEAL 4100 Health Behavior                                

3

HEAL 4800 Public Health Research/Stats                       

3

KINE 3730 Fitness Assessment/Program                       

2

Skills/Comm Health Elective                                  

3

Social Science Support Elective                       

3

Total 17 hours

 

Senior Year

HEAL 4200 Methods/Materials in C.H.            

3

HEAL 4700 Nutrition Science                       

3

HEAL Health Elective                                  

3

Social Science Support Elective                       

3

Elective                                                          

3

Total 15 hours

 

HEAL 4940 Senior Field Experience                       

9

Social Science support Elective                       

3

Multicultural Elective                       

3

Total 15 hours

 

Health Education Pre K-12

Susan Telljohann, program coordinator
Students who complete the health education major will be eligible for license to teach health education pre K-12. (See the College of Education for B.Ed degree details.)

Health Care Administration

Darryl Lippman, program coordinator

The health care administration program provides students with knowledge and skills to act as health-care administrators in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, long-term care and outpatient facilities, physician offices, and public health agencies. This interdisciplinary program introduces students to managerial concepts and related skills. The health-care core courses enhance students’ knowledge in a variety of related subjects, including current health issues, legislation affecting health care, and management theories and decision making, all of which are important in health care administration.

Students interested in health-care administration have several options to consider, depending on their interests. Students completing the four-year program in health care administration concurrently receive a minor in business.  In addition, a concentration in long-term care administration is also available. A 2 + 2 year program is offered to individuals who hold at least an associate’s degree in a health related field. These students most often have direct health-care work experience, such as nurses and respiratory therapists, who want to further their education and management expertise. Students enrolling in the 2+2 program have two options, namely, either (1) the hybrid program (combination classroom and online course) or (2) the totally online program.

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration – Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman
Year

 

ENGL 1110 College Composition I 

3

ECON 1200 Prin. of Microeconomics 

3

MATH 1260 Mod. Bus. Mathematics I 

3

BUAD 1020 Micro-Comp. Applications 

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective 

3

HHS 1000 College Orientation 

1

Total 16 Hours

 

 

 

ENGL 2960 Organizational Rep. Writing

3

ECON 1150 Prin. of Macroeconomics

3

HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology

3

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology

3

Social Science Elective

3

Multi-Cultural Elective

3

Total 15 Hours

 

 

Sophomore
Year

 

BUAD 2040 Fin. Accounting Info.

3

KINE 2560 Anatomy & Physiology I

3

HEAL 2800 Principles of Nutrition

3

Multicultural Elective

3

Program Elective

3

Total 15 Hours

 

                    

 

BUAD 2050 Acct. for Bus. Dec. Making

3

KINE 2570 Anatomy & Physiology II

3

HCAR 3000 Intro to Health Care Admin

3

PSY 2200 Abnormal Psychology

3

General Elective

4

Total 16 Hours

 

 

Junior
Year

 

BUAD 3030 Mang. & Behavioral Proc.

3

BUAD 2060 Data Analysis for Bus. or MATH 2630 Stats. For Bus. & Econ

3

Natural Science Elective          

3

HCAR 4500 Health Care Infomatics

4

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

Total 16 Hours

 

 

 

BUAD 3010 Principles of Marketing

3

PHIL 3370 Medical Ethics

3

HCAR 4360 Quality Improve in HC

3

HURM 3220 Human Resource Mgmt.

3

Program Elective

3

Total 15 Hours

 

 

Senior
Year

 

HCAR 4510 Medical & Legal Aspects of HC

3

HCAR 4550 Health Care Finance

3

HIM 3200 Health Care Resources Payers &

3

HURM 3630 Conflict Res. & Negotiation

3

General Elective

3

Total 16 Hours

 

 

 

HCAR 4530 Prob. Solving in HC Environment

4

HCAR 4540 Internship in Health Management

3

General Elective

3

Program Elective

6

Total 16 Hours

 

 

* Long Term Care Concentration available.  See adviser for proper program elective selections.

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration – Degree Requirements

Applied Health Care Concentration (2+2-year program)
Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Junior
Year

 

ENGL 2960 Organ. Report Writing

3

ECON 1200 Prin. of Microeconomics

3

HCAR 4510 Medical/Legal Aspect of Health Care

3

BUAD 2040 Financial Accounting Info

3

MATH 1260 or MATH 1180

3

Total hours

15

 

 

HCAR 4500 Health Care Info Systems

4

ECON 1150 Prin. of Macroeconomics

3

HCAR 4360 Quality Improvement in Health Care

3

 BUAD 3030 Managerial and Behavioral Proc.

3

HCAR 3000 Intro to health Care Administration

3

Total hours

16

 

Senior
Year

 

HCAR 4530 Problem Solving in Health Care

4

HURM 3220 Intro to Hum. Res. Management

3

BUAD 3010 Principles of Marketing

3

MATH 2600 Statistics  BUAD 2060 Data Analysis

 

for Bus. or HEAL 4800 Public Health & Res. Stats.

3

BUAD 1020 or CMPT 1100

3

Total hours

16

 

 

HCAR 4550 Health Care Finance

3

HCAR 4540 Internship in Health Management    

3

PHIL 3370 Medical Ethics

3

Electives

3-6

Total hours

12-15

 

University Core Curriculum requirements must be met
Electives available include HIM 3200 Healthcare Resources, Payers and Consumers – 3 credits

Health Information Administration

Marie Janes, program coordinator
Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration
The curriculum of the bachelor of science degree in health information administration (HIA) encompasses a broad range of disciplines, including medicine, health, business, informatics and information management. Graduates serve in a variety of health-care managerial and administrative  roles, including planning, organizing, controlling and evaluating health information systems; applying legal principles, policies, regulations and standards and analyzing their impact on risk management; and supervising personnel in various health-care settings. Health information managers are responsible for health records and must assure adequate documentation for accurate classifying and indexing of diagnoses, treatments and procedures for the purpose of planning, and reimbursement. Health information administrators are responsible for planning, engineering, workflow applications, research, reporting and policy administration.
Professional practice experience (PPE) is an integral part of the health administration curriculum,  The PPE is project oriented. Students act as Project Managers, creating a proposal letter and project forms, deliverable(s), presentation, survey, and follow up analysis. Sites and projects vary by location. The program accepts transfer credit that equates to UT courses from most accredited colleges and universities. Courses in HIA are online. Venture Learning provides assistance to students in the HIA program.
Note: The Health Information Administration program has been accredited by The Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM) with the Commission on Accreditation. Graduates of the HIA program at The University of Toledo are eligible to sit for the certification examination. The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) grants successful examination candidates recognition as Registered Health Information Administrator (RHIA).

Degree Requirements
Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed in the health information administration program of study.

Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

HHS 1000 HHS/College Orientation     

1

HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology                        

3

BUAD 1020 Microcomputer Applications    OR CMPT 1100 Computer Info Systems

3

KINE 2560 Anatomy and Physiology I  

3

ENGL 1100/1110 Comp I (w/workshop)                        

3-5

Total 13 -15 hours

 

 

KINE 2570 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 

3

MATH 1180 Mathematics for Liberal Arts    

3

BMGT 1540 Organizational Behavior or BUAD 2030 Leadership and Org Sur Skills

3

Social Science Elective

3

Natural Science Elective

3

Total 15 hours

 

Sophomore
Year

ENGL 2950 Science & Technical Report Writing   or ENGL 2960 Organizational Report Writing

3

KINE 2580 Human Pathophysiology

3

Social Sci Gen Ed or Social Sci Elective

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

Multicultural Elective       

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

HIM 2210 Med Linguistics in Ancillary Scvs

3

MATH 2600 Introduction to Statistics

3

BMGT 2020 Human Resource Mgmt

3

ACTG 2310 Cost Accounting in HC

3

Multicultural Elective     

3

Total 15 hours

 

Junior Year

HIM 3200 HC Res Payers & Consumer

3

HIM 3210 Acute Care Clinical Classification Systems & Services

3

HIM 3230 HC Documentation Req

3

Upper division Program Support Course

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

HIM 3220 Ambulatory Clinical Classification Systems and Services

3

HIM 3240 Health Info Admin Practices

4

HIM 3940 Healthcare Content and Record Management 

4

Elective

3

HCAR 4360 Quality Improvement- Health Care

3

Total 17 hours

 

 

Senior Year

HIM 4200 Reimbursement Methodologies

2

HIM 4210 Healthcare Stats Registr Resch

3

HIM 4260 Legal & Ethical Issues in HC

3

HIM 4220 Project Management in HC

3

Upper division Program Support Course

3

Elective (Foreign Language Recommended)

3

Total 17 hours

 

 

HIM 4910 Integrative Capstone Exp 

3

HIM 4940 Professional Practice

4

HCAR 4500 Health Care Informatics

4

Upper division Program Support Course

3

Elective (Foreign Language Recommended)

3

Total 14 hours

 

 

Notes:

  • Graduation requirements require 123-125 credit hours
  • Students must complete at least 64 hours at the 2000 course level or above
  • Students must complete at 32 hours at the 3000, 4000 course level
  • See Adviser for program support and course selection

Recreation and Leisure Studies Programs

Recreation and leisure studies offers a bachelors of science (BS) in both recreation and leisure studies (RLS) and recreational therapy (RECT). The baccalaureate RLS and baccalaureate RECT programs are accredited by the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA).

The RLS program includes preparation as recreation and park professionals and specialization in tourism and event planning. Students graduating from the RLS program have met the educational and degree requirements to take the examination for Certified Park and Recreation Professional (CPRP) by the National Recreation & Park Association.

Students completing the RECT program may enroll in the pre-occupational therapy track.  Students graduating from the RECT program have met the educational and clinical requirements to take the examination for Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) by the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification.

Baccalaureate candidates in RLS may also elect to take an optional support core option for students needing specialized course work for graduate study or employment qualifications.

Bachelor of Science in Recreation and Leisure Studies
Eric Longsdorf, program coordinator

Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed in the recreation and leisure studies degree requirement chart.

Students enrolling in the RLS program receive an education designed to prepare them for employment in the areas of community recreation, recreation resource management, and travel, tourism and event planning.

The tourism/event planning specialization prepares students for managerial positions in industry settings such as resorts, convention centers, sport and other community events, festivals, cruise lines, theme parks, museums, multinational hotels and tour companies.   The curriculum combines both theory and practice in the multidisciplinary study of tourism.  Technical training is taught in workshop form to prepare interested students wishing to do wedding planning and mega sport event coordination. 

Students who want to major in the RLS program enter under conditional status. The RLS student is able to enroll in University undergraduate core curriculum courses, pre-recreation and leisure studies curriculum courses, and recreation and leisure studies support curriculum courses while under conditional status.

Selective Admission Requirements

After completion of all pre-recreation and leisure studies (PRLS) curriculum courses, 33 additional credit hours from the University undergraduate core curriculum, and RLS support curriculum courses, a student is eligible to apply for acceptance into the upper division of the RLS major. Minimum requirements for admittance into the upper division of the RLS major include:

1.     Student transcript
2.     Completion of 48 credit hours taken from a) the University core curriculum, b) RLS support curriculum, and c) pre-recreation and leisure studies curriculum. Note: 15 of these 48 credit hours must come from the pre-recreation and leisure studies curriculum

  • Completion of all courses in the pre-recreation and leisure studies curriculum, with a no less than a “C” grade in any course
  • Completion of the recreation and leisure studies professional sequence application

Once a student is formally accepted into the upper division of the RLS program, he or she is permitted to enroll in the professional sequence curriculum courses.

Culminating Experience Requirements

After completion of all required RLS course work students are eligible to apply for the RLS senior internship.  The senior internship is the final RLS curriculum requirement and is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply educational achievements in a practitioner setting.  Minimum requirements for approval to complete the 12-hour culminating experience include:

  • Completion of all RCRT courses with no less than a “C” grade in any course
  • An accumulative GPA of no less than 2.7 for all course work completed
  • Approval to complete the senior internship

Graduation Requirements

To graduate with a degree in Recreation and Leisure Studies, a student must:

  • Complete a minimum of 124 credit hours, and
  • Complete entire RLS curriculum with no less than a “C” grade in any RCRT course.

Bachelor of Science in Recreation & Leisure Studies – Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Freshman Year

RCRT 1300 Intro. to Rec. & Leisure

3

RCA 1010 1020 1030 Elective

1

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology

3

SOC 1750 Social Problems

3

ENGL 1110 College Composition I

3

HHS 1000 College Orientation

1

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

 

RCRT 1310 Recreation Programming

3

Natural Science Elective            

3

MATH 1180 – 2600 Elective

3

ENGL 2960 Org. Report Writing

3

Multicultural (Non-U.S.) Elective

3

 

 

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

 

Sophomore Year

RCRT 2300 Rec. Leadership & Gr. Dynamics

3

RLS Support Electives             

3

RCA 1010 1020 1030 Elective

1

HEAL 1500 First Aid          

2

Natural Science Elective       

3

Natural Science Lab

1

 

 

Total 13 hours

 

 

RCRT 2300 Rec. Leadership & Gr. Dynamics

3

RLS Support Electives                

3

RCA 1010 1020 1030 Elective

1

HEAL 1500 First Aid

2

Natural Science Elective

3

Natural Science Lab

1

 

 

Total 13 hours

 

 

RCRT 3940 Rec. Application Experience           

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total 3 Hours

 

 

Junior Year

RCRT 4330 Administration  Rec. & RT

3

RCA 1010 1020 1030 Elective

1

COMM 2600 Public Presentations

3

Multicultural (Diversity of U.S.) Elective

3

RLS Support Elective

3

 

 

Total 13 hours

 

 

RCRT 4340 Leisure Recreation & Aging

3

BUAD 3030 Mngt. & Beh. Proc. in Org.

3

COMM 3840 Interpersonal Comm.

4

RLS Support Elective

3

 

 

 

 

Total 13 hours

 

 

RCRT 4530 Rec. Policy & Leadership

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total 3 Hours

 

 

Senior Year

RCRT 4430 Interpretive Services

3

RCRT 4450 Research Applications Rec & RT

3

GEPL 3710 Urban Environments

3

RCA 1010 1020 1030 Elective

1

RLS Support Elective

3

 

 

Total 13 hours

 

 

RCRT 4440 Park & Rec. Planning

3

RCRT 4520 Urb. Park & Open Sp. Admin

3

RCRT 4850 Internship Preparation: RLS

1

RCRT 3710 Adventure Prog. in Rec. & RT

3

RLS Support Electives

3

 

 

Total 13 hours

 

 

RCRT 4770 Project Design: RLS

2

RCRT 4930 Senior Internship

4

RCRT 4930 Senior Internship

4

RCRT 4780 Project Evaluation: RLS

2

 

 

 

 

Total 12 hours

 

   

 

Community Recreation & Park Services
(74 Credit Hours)

Tourism & Event Planning
(74 Credit Hours)

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology (3 cr.)
PSY 2510 Lifespan Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)
ECON 1150 Principles of Macro Economics (3 cr.)
ECON 1200 Principles of Micro Economics (3 cr.)
BMGT 2700 Managing Diversity in the Workplace (3 cr.)
BUAD 2040 Financial Accounting Information (3 cr.)
BUAD 3010 Principles of Marketing (3 cr.)
BUAD 3030 Mgt. & Behavioral Processes in Org. (3 cr.)
COMM 3840 Interpersonal Communication (4 cr.)
HEAL 1500 First-Aid (2 cr.)
HEAL 2500 Personal Health (3 cr.)
RCA 1020 Beginning Swimming (2 cr.)
RCRT 1400 Camping & Outdoor Recreation (3 cr.)
RCRT 2310 Volunteerism (1 cr.)
RCRT 4000 Community Event Planning (3 cr.)
RCRT 4010 Planning & promotion of Sport (3 cr.)
RCRT 4430 Interpretive Services (3 cr.)
RCRT 4440 Park & Recreation Planning (3 cr.)
RCRT 4520 Urban Park & Open Space Administration (3 cr.)
RCRT 4530 Recreation Policy & Leadership (3 cr.)
Humanities Elective (3 cr.)
Natural Science Elective (3 cr.)
Natural Science Elective (3 cr.)
Natural Science Lab (1 cr.)
Non-U.S. Multicultural Elective (3 cr.)

General Electives to obtain 124 Credit Hour Minimum

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology (3 cr.)
PSY 2510 Lifespan Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)
ECON 1150 Principles of Macro Economics (3 cr.)
ECON 1200 Principles of Micro Economics (3 cr.)
ECON 4550 Economic Development (3 cr.)
BMGT 2700 Managing Diversity in the Workplace (3 cr.)
BUAD 2040 Financial Accounting Information (3 cr.)
BUAD 3010 Principles of Marketing (3 cr.)
BUAD 3030 Mgt. & Behavioral Processes in Org. (3 cr.)
COMM 3840 Interpersonal Communication (4 cr.)
RCRT 2200 Introduction to Travel & Tourism (3 cr.)
RCRT 2310 Volunteerism (1 cr.)
RCRT 4000 Community Event Planning (3 cr.)
RCRT 4010 Planning & promotion of Sport (3 cr.)
RCRT 4020 Policy & Development Tourism Course (3 cr.)
RCRT 4530 Recreation Policy & Leadership (3 cr.)
Humanities Elective (3 cr.)
Natural Science Elective (3 cr.)
Natural Science Elective (3 cr.)
Natural Science Lab (1 cr.)
 



Select 2

GEPL 3030 Geography of Europe (3 cr.)
GEPL 3050 Geography of U.S. and Canada (3 cr.)
GEPL 3120 Geography of Asia (3 cr.)
GEPL 3220 Geography of Africa (3 cr.)
GEPL 3300 Geography of Latin America (3 cr.)


General Electives to obtain 124 Credit Hour Minimum

 

Recreation & Leisure Studies Minor Degree Requirements

Students seeking a minor in recreation and leisure studies must have a current GPA of 2.0 for acceptance into the minor and achieve a composite GPA of 2.0 for all RCRT coursework completed, with no less than a “C” grade in any RCRT course.

Students completing the minor in recreation and leisure studies must complete 12 credit hours of required core coursework and 9 credit hours of RCRT elective coursework, totaling 21 credit hours, as follows:

Core Requirements: 12 Credit Hours

RCRT 1300 Introduction to Recreation & Leisure
RCRT 1310 Recreation Programming
RCRT 2300 Recreation Leadership & Group Dynamics
RCRT 3310 Recreation & Adaptation for Special Populations

Elective Requirements: 9 Credit Hours

Students may meet the elective requirements of the minor in Recreation and Leisure Studies by completing three courses from the following:

RCRT 3940 Recreation Application Experience

Summer Semester Only

RCRT 3710 Adventure Programming in Recreation & Recreational Therapy

 

RCRT 4330 Administration in Recreation & Recreational Therapy

 

RCRT 4340 Leisure Recreation & Aging

 

RCRT 4430 Interpretive Services

Fall Semester Only

RCRT 4440 Park & Recreation Planning

Spring Semester Only

RCRT 4450 Research Application in Recreation & Recreation Therapy

Fall Semester Only

RCRT 4520 Urban Park & Open Space Administration

Spring Semester Only

RCRT 4530 Recreation Policy & Leadership 

Summer Semester Only

University of Toledo / Bowling Green State University Collaborative Opportunities

Students enrolled in recreation and leisure studies at Bowling Green State University have the option of completing coursework in recreational therapy through the University of Toledo’s recreation and leisure studies program. Completion of recreational therapy coursework provided at the University of Toledo qualifies students to sit for the Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) examination.

Students enrolled in recreation and leisure studies at the University of Toledo interested in tourism have the option to design an individualized support curriculum for completing coursework in tourism through Bowling Green State University’s Division of Sport Management, Recreation and Tourism.

Individualized Degree Option

Students may elect to develop an individualized support curriculum designed to provide an opportunity to take specific coursework in pursuit of specialized areas of employment in recreation or recreation-related fields or to meet specific prerequisite requirements for graduate study.

The individualized degree option requires 23 credit hours of program electives. Course selections must be approved by a student’s academic adviser and the department chairperson. The individualized degree option is designed by both the student and his/her academic adviser and is taken in place of RLS support curriculum courses.

Bachelor of Science in Recreational Therapy

Ruthie Kucharewski, program coordinator

Requirements

This program meets professional standards set by the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC), National Therapeutic Recreation Society (NTRS), and the American Therapeutic Recreation Association (ATRA).

Students enrolling in the recreational therapy program receive an education designed to prepare them for employment in the areas of physical rehabilitation, psychiatric rehabilitation, geriatric services, pediatric services, camps for individuals with disabilities, community recreation for individuals with disabilities and centers for mental retardation/ developmental disabilities. Students will complete one or more of the following 6-15 credit hour tracks as part of their recreational therapy program of study:

Psychology (Minor in Psychology Available)    
Pediatric       
Therapeutic Arts      
Geriatric                   
Communication
General                                                                
Pre-Occupational Therapy 

Students wishing to major in the recreational therapy program enter under conditional status as a pre-recreational therapy major.  The pre-recreational therapy student is able to enroll in University undergraduate core curriculum courses, pre-recreational therapy curriculum courses, and recreational therapy support curriculum courses.

Selective Admission Requirements

After completion of all pre-recreational therapy curriculum courses and the completion of 27 additional credit hours from the University undergraduate core curriculum and recreational therapy support curriculum courses, a student is eligible to apply for acceptance into the upper division of the recreational therapy major. Minimum requirements for admittance into the upper division of the recreational therapy major include:

Junior Year:

  1. Copy of student transcript
  2. Completion of 48 credit hours taken from a) the University core curriculum, b) recreational therapy support curriculum, and c) pre-recreational therapy curriculum. Note: 21 of these 48 credit hours must include the following: RCRT 1300, RCRT 1310, RCRT 2300, RCRT 3310, PSY 2200, PSY 2510, and HEAL 1500 with no less than a “C” grade in any course, and
  3. Completion of the recreational therapy professional sequence application. 

Senior Year:

  1. Completion of  77 credit hours including the following courses: RCRT 4720, RCRT 4730, RCRT 4740, RCRT 4750 and RCRT 4790 with no less than a “C” grade in any course,
  2. Minimum 2.8 GPA
  3. Minimum of 100 experience hours (50 hours will be completed during pre-professional coursework), and if necessary
  4. Three letters of recommendation.

Culminating Experience Requirements

After completion of all required recreational therapy course work, students are eligible to apply for the senior internship.  The senior internship is the final curriculum requirement and is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply educational achievements in a practitioner setting.  Minimum requirements for approval to complete the 12-hour culminating experience include:

  1. Completion of all recreational therapy RCRT courses with no less than a “C” grade in any course,
  2. An accumulative GPA of no less than 2.7 for all course work completed,
  3. Approval to complete the senior internship.

Graduation Requirements

Tograduate with a degree in recreational therapy, a student must:

  1. Complete a minimum of 127 credit hours, and
  2. Complete entire recreational therapy curriculum with no less than a “C” grade in PSY 2200, PSY 2510, HEAL 1500 and any RCRT course.

Bachelor of Science in Recreational Therapy– Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

RCRT 1300 Intro. to Rec. & Leisure

3

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology

3

SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology

3

ENGL 1110 College Composition I

3

MATH 1180 Math for Liberal Arts

3

HHS 1000 College Orientation

1

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

RCRT 1310 Recreation Programming

3

PSY 2510 Lifespan Developmental Psy.

3

Natural Science Elective

3

ENGL 2960 Org. Report Writing

3

Humanities Elective

3

 

 

 

 

Total 15hours

 

Sophomore Year

RCRT 2300 Rec. Leadership & Gr. Dynamics

3

KINE 2560 Anatomy & Physiology I

3

KINE 2460 Anatomy & Physiology I Lab

1

PSY 2200 Abnormal Psychology

3

Multicultural (Non-U.S.) Elective

3

 

 

Total 13hours

 

RCRT 3310 Rec. & Adapt. for Spec. Pop.         

3

KINE 2570 Anatomy & Physiology II               

3

KINE 2470 Anatomy & Physiology I Lab         

1

HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology                     

3

RCRT 4720 Introduction to TR                          

3

 

 

Total 13hours

 

Junior Year

RCRT 4730 Med/Clinical Aspects in TR

3

Humanities Elective

3

Multicultural (Diversity of U.S.) Elective

3

Track Elective

3

Select 3 from RCRT 4600, 4610, 4630, 4660, 4670

3

 

 

Total 15hours

 

RCRT 4740 Assessment & Doc.  TR                 

3

RCRT 4750 Group Dynamics in RT                  

3

RCRT 4790 Med/Clinical Aspects in TR II      

3

RCRT 4340 Leisure Recreation & Aging         

3

Select 2 from RCRT 4600, 4610, 4630,4660, 4670    

2

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

Senior Year

RCRT 4450 Research Applications Rec & RT

3

RCRT 3710 Adventure Prog. in Rec. & RT

3

Track Elective

3

RCRT 4850 Internship Preparation: RECT

1

Select 2 from RCRT 4800, 4810, 4820, 4830

2

Select 2 from RCRT 4620,4640, 4680,4690, 4860

2

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

RCRT 4330 Administration  Rec. & RT            

3

RCRT 4870 Program Planning RT                     

3

RCRT 4440 Park & Rec. Planning                     

3

Select 2 from RCRT 4800, 4810, 4820, 4830    

2

Select 3 from RCRT 4620,4640, 4680,4690, 4860

2

 

 

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

 

Summer Semesters

 

Junior Year

RCRT 4840 RT Clinical: Pediatric

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total 1 hour

 

Senior Year

RCRT 4770 Project Design: RLS

2

RCRT 4930 Senior Internship

4

RCRT 4930 Senior Internship

4

RCRT 4780 Project Evaluation: RLS

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total 12 hours     

 

 

UT Pre-Occupational Therapy

The pre-occupational therapy track within the recreational therapy degree can provide the student with the background needed for application to the graduate degree in the occupational therapy. The occupational therapy doctorate is offered at The University of Toledo in the college of Health Science and Human Service.

UT Pre-Occupational Therapy (6 hours)
AED        4560        Introduction to Therapeutic Art                                               3
One course from any other track or an elective approved by adviser.
UT Occupational Therapy Program Selection Application Criteria
To apply for admission to the graduate occupational therapy program at the University of Toledo, students must meet these criteria:

1.Completion of PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology, SOC 1010 Introduction of Sociology, PSY 2510 Lifespan Development Psychology, PSY 2200 Abnormal Psychology, KINE 2560 Anatomy & Physiology I, KINE 2570 Anatomy & Physiology II, and HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology with a B- or higher in each course.
2. Completion of a bachelor’s degree with a minimum GPA of 3.0 GPA.  If GPA is 3.5 or greater, the GRE is not required.  Students can be selected prior to completion of their bachelor’s degree. Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 at the time of application and must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 after acceptance.
3. Completion of the GRE with an average of 33% across the three areas – verbal, quantitative and writing.

4. Prerequisites: must have achieved a B- or better in all prerequisites. Consult the following website for more specific information: http://www.utoledo.edu/hshs/ot/index.html.

Applications are available in mid-July; applications may be submitted anytime after September 1st for admission the following academic year.  Applications are processed and students are accepted as applications are received (rolling admission) until the class is filled.  Applicants are encouraged to apply for early admission.  The occupational therapy program is selective and completion of the above criteria does not guarantee admission into the program.  US News and World Report rates The University of Toledo occupational therapy doctoral program in the top 25% of graduate level occupational therapy programs.  This is quite an accomplishment since there are 155 occupational therapy programs in the country.

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Department of Kinesiology


Barry Scheuermann, chair

Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training
Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science
Biomechanics
Exercise Physiology
Health Promotion and Human Performance
Pre-physical Therapy
Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Care

Athletic Training
James Rankin, program coordinator
The bachelor of science in athletic training prepares students for entry-level positions in college/university, high school, sports medicine clinic, professional sports, performing arts, military, and industrial settings. Athletic trainers work under physicians to ensure the health and safety of physically active individuals, they work cooperatively with other allied health personnel and coaches to accomplish this goal. The athletic training education program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. In Ohio, athletic training is a licensed profession requiring an additional examination to be licensed. Athletic training is a regulated profession in 47 states, and the UT program meets or exceeds the criteria in almost all of those states.
Any student may declare an interest in the athletic training education program and begin the pre-professional component of the program. Students are accepted into the professional component on a space-available basis. At the end of the first year, students must file an application for acceptance into the professional component of the athletic training education program with the program coordinator. The maximum capacity of the entering the second year class is based on instructional capacity, the number of off-campus clinical sites, and the number of clinical opportunities in intercollegiate athletics at UT.  Students  usually begin in the fall semester  and are required to take KINE 1110 Introduction to Athletic Training at that time. Students who begin in the Spring semester must take KINE 1110, Introduction to Athletic Training, along with KINE 1650, KINE 1660, KINE 2510, KINE 2520, and HEAL 1500. Acceptance into the professional program occurs at the beginning of a student’s second year of involvement with the athletic training education program. The Board of Certification (BOC) requires athletic training students to complete their clinical experience during a minimum of two years and a maximum of five years. Consequently, transfer students may not complete the athletic training education program in fewer than four years from the date of the first enrollment in the program.
For more information, see the athletic training education program.

Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

HHS    1000 Orientation                                

1

ENGL 1110 College Composition I                       

3

KINE  1110 Intro to Athletic Training.                       

2

MATH 1340 Algebra & Trig                       

4

BIOL   2150 Fund of Life Science I                        

4

BIOL   2160 Fund of Life Science I Lab                       

1

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

KINE 1650 Care and Prevention of Injuries                       

3

KINE 1660 AT Taping Lab                            

1

KINE 1700 Intro to Exercise Science                       

2

HEAL 1500 First Aid                                                   

2

KINE 2510 Human Anatomy        

3

KINE 2520 Human Anatomy Lab 

1

BIOL   2170 Fund of Life Science II                       

4

BIOL   2180 Fund of Life Science II Lab                       

1

Total 17 hours

 

Sophomore Year

 

KINE   2610 Lower Extremity Evaluation      

3

KINE   2710 Clinical Skill Development I                       

2

ENGL  2950 Scientific Tech Rpt. Writing.         

3

CHEM 1230 General Chemistry I                      

4

CHEM 1280 General Chemistry I Lab               

1

Multicultural Elective                                      

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

 

KINE   2530 Human Physiology    

3

KINE   2540 Human Physiology Lab                       

1

KINE   2620 Upper Extremity Evaluation                       

3

KINE   2720 Clinical Skill Development II                       

2

PSY     1010 Principles of Psychology   

3

COMM 1010 Communications Principles     

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

Junior  Year

 

KINE   3520 Exercise Physiology    

3

KINE   3530 Exercise Physiology Lab

1

KINE   3610 General Medical Conditions     

2

KINE   3630  Therapeutic Modalities             

3

KINE   3710 Clinical Skill Development III

3

PHYS 2070 Physics Mechanical      

5

Total 17 hours

 

 

KINE 2960 Growth, Dev and Motor Act

4

KINE 3660 Rehab of Athletic Injuries

3

KINE 3720 Clinical Skill Development IV

3

PHCL 2200 Drugs, Meds. & Society

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

Senior Year

 

HEAL 2500 Personal Health                       

3

MATH 2600 Intro. Statistics        

3

KINE 4540 Applied Biomechanics

3

KINE 4550 Biomechanics Lab                       

1

KINE 4650 Admin AT                     

3

KINE 4710 Clinical Skill Development V

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

 

KINE 4720 Clinical Skill Development VI

4

KINE 4910 Senior Research Project

4

HEAL4700 Nutrition Science            

3

Multicultural Elective

3

Social Science Core Elective

3

 

 

Total 17 hours

 

Exercise Science Programs
Barry Scheuermann, program coordinator

The bachelor of science degree in exercise science (B.S.E.S.) is designed for students who want to study the anatomical, physiological, biomechanical and psychological bases of human physical performance. The curriculum has a strong foundation in the natural sciences; students have the opportunity to specialize in one of the following areas: biomechanics, exercise physiology, health promotion and human performance, and pre-physical therapy. Many students use the degree as a steppingstone to graduate education in exercise science, medicine and other allied health fields such as physical therapy and occupational therapy.

Additional information about the bachelor of science in exercise science degree can be found at the department’s Web site at www.utoledo.edu/hshs/kinesiology/undergradprograms.html.

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science Degree Requirements
Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed in the exercise science (biomechanics, applied and clinical physiology, exercise physiology, health promotion and human performance or pre-physical therapy) program of study charts.
Biomechanics
The B.S.E.S. concentration in biomechanics combines course work, research and clinical experience in the application of principles of physics, engineering and computer science to the study of human physical performance. Students in this concentration use tools such as high-speed video and electromyography to study such topics as the basis of sport injury, the effects of disease on human motion, and techniques for facilitating sport performance. Those who choose this option generally intend to prepare for graduate study in biomechanics or other areas such as podiatry, prosthetics, physical or occupational therapy or medicine.

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science – Biomechanics Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

MATH 1850 Calculus I  

4

ENGL 1110 College Composition I 

3

KINE 1700 Intro to Exercise Science

2

BIOL 2150 Fund of Life Science I

4

BIOL 2160 Fund of Life Science I Lab

1

HHS  1000 Orientation

1

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

MATH 1860 Calculus II                             

4

HEAL 1500 First Aid 

2

BIOL 2170 Fund of Life Science II

4

BIOL 2180 Fund of Life Science II Lab

1

EECS 1050 Intro to Comp. In C/C++

2

HEAL Health Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

Sophomore Year

 

CHEM 1230 General Chemistry I                      

4

CHEM 1280 General Chemistry I Lab               

1

KINE 2510 Human Anatomy

3

KINE 2520 Anatomy Lab                         

1

PHYS 2140 Physics for Sci.  & Engr. II

5

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology

3

 

 

Total 17 hours

 

 

PHYS 2130 Physics for Sci. & Eng. I 

5

KINE 2530 Human Physiology

3

KINE 2540 Human Physiology Lab

1

ENGL 2950 Scientific Tech. Rpt. Wtr.

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

Junior
Year

 

CIVE 1150 Engr’g Mechanics: Statics

3

KINE 2960 Growth, Dev., & Motor Act.

4

KINE 4540 Applied Biomechanics                       

3

KINE 4550 Applied Biomechanics Lab

1

KINE 4990 Independent Study 

3

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

 

MIME 2300 Engr’g Dynamics

3

KINE 3520 Applied Exercise Physiology  

3

KINE 3530 Exercise Physiology Lab

1

KINE 3820 Sports Medicine for Coaches

3

KINE 4900 Human Performance Sem

3

COMM 3840 Interpersonal Comm 

4

Total 17 hours

 

Senior Year

 

KINE 4990 Independent Study

3

RESM 4100 Statistics

3

HEAL 4700 Nutrition Science

3

HEAL Health Elective

3

Multicultural Elective  

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

KINE 4910 Senior Research Project

4

KINE 4990 Independent Study

3

KINE Kinesiology elective

3

Social Science Core Elective

3

Multicultural Elective

3

Total 16 hours

 

Health Promotion and Human Performance
Many exercise science students are interested in applying their interest and expertise in human physical performance to the prevention and treatment of disease and disability, the enhancement of health and fitness, and to facilitating sport performance through training and conditioning. The B.S.E.S. concentration in health promotion and human performance is designed for these students. Beyond the required exercise science courses, these students take additional course work that focuses on the use of exercise and exercise testing in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, reduced muscle strength and endurance tolerance. Students in this concentration will focus on the development of exercise programs that are designed to enhance health, general fitness and exercise performance. In addition to a practicum and two internships, many of these students complete one or more of the certification programs offered by organizations such as the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Strength and Conditioning Association. These certifications, in combination with the student’s academic training, provide excellent credentials for employment in fitness/wellness programs, cardiovascular rehabilitation, as well as many commercial fitness facilities.

 

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science – Health Promotion and Human Performance Requirements (formerly the Applied and Clinical Physiology Concentration)

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

BIOL 2150 Fund Life Sci I

4

BIOL 2160 Fund Life Sci I Lab

1

KINE 1700 Intro to Exercise Science

2

ENGL 1110 College Composition I 

3

MATH 1340 Algebra & Trig

4

HHS 1000 College Orientation

1

 

 

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

CHEM 1230 General Chemistry I

4

CHEM 1280 General Chemistry I Lab

1

ENGL 2950 Scientific Tech. Rpt. Wrtg

3

HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology  

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

Social Science Core Elective

3

 

 

 

 

Total 17 hours

 

Sophomore Year

 

USMulticultural Elective                                  

3

KINE 2510 Human Anatomy

3

KINE 2520 Human Anatomy lab  

1

Multicultural Non Western Elective

3

PHYS 2070 General Physics I

5

 

 

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

COMM 3840 Interpersonal Comm.   

4

PHCL 2220  Drugs, Med and Society

3

KINE 2530 Human Physiology      

3

KINE 2540 Human Physiology Lab

1

KINE 4540 Biomechanics

3

KINE 4550 Biomechanics Lab

1

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

Junior
Year

 

HEAL 4560 Health Problems of Aging

3

KINE 3850 Cardiac Dysrythmias Inter.

3

KINE 3520 Appl’d Exercise Physiology

3

KINE 3530 Appl’d Exercise Phys. Lab

1

KINE 3920 Cardiopulmon. Physiol.

3

KINE 3830 Prin Stren and Cond

2

KINE 3650 Prof Respon in Fit Ind

3

 

 

 

 

Total 18 hours

 

 

HEAL 4700  Nutrition Science

3

KINE 4850 Clinical Exercise Testing

3

KINE 4860 Clinical Exercise Testing Lab

1

KINE 3940 Fitness Practicum       

3

KINE 3820 Prev and Tre of Exer Inj

3

RCBS 3300 Adv Clin Life Supp

1

KINE 4830 Prin of Endurance Cond

3

 

 

 

 

Total 17 hours

 

Senior
 Year

 

KINE 4200 Pers Well and Health Strat

3

KINE 4620 Prin Therap Exercise

3

HEAL 4750 Obes and Eat Disorders

3

KINE 4140 Fitness Internship I

4

Social Science Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

 

KINE 4210 Exer Fac Management

3

KINE 4840 Fitness Internship II   

6

KINE 4810 Seminar in Health and Fit

1

HEAL  Health Elective   

3

 

 

 

 

Total 13 hours

 

126 hours

Exercise Physiology
The B.S.E.S. specialization in exercise physiology is intended to provide students with in-depth study of the physiological bases of human physical performance. In addition to seminars, laboratory research and advanced courses in exercise physiology, students who complete this specialization take additional courses in biology and chemistry. Students taking this concentration work closely with a faculty mentor to design and complete an independent research project of their choosing during their senior year. Upon graduation, those who have chosen this concentration often pursue graduate training in exercise physiology, physical therapy, another allied health field, or medical school. Others wishing to begin a career immediately upon graduation may be employed in fitness and wellness centers or corporate fitness, or they may work as personal trainers.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

ENGL 1110 English Composition I 

3

CHEM 1230 General Chemistry I    

4

CHEM 1280 General Chemistry Lab

1

KINE 1700   Intro to Exercise Science

2

MATH 1340 Algebra/Trigonometry

4

HHS 1000 Orientation

1

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology

3

CHEM 1240 General Chemistry II   

4

CHEM 1290 General Chemistry II Lab

1

ENGL 2950 Science & Tech. Rpt. Wrtg.

3

HEAL 1500 First Aid

2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

Sophomore Year

 

KINE 2510 Human Anatomy

3

KINE 2520 Anatomy Lab  

1

BIOL 2150 Fund of Life Science I

4

BIOL 2160 Fund of Life Science I Lab

1

Social Science Core Elective

3

General Elective

3

Total 15 hours

 

 

BIOL 2170 Fund of Life Science II

4

BIOL 2180 Fund of Life Science II Lab

1

KINE 2530 Human Physiology      

3

KINE 2540 Human Physiology Lab

1

Multicultural Elective

3

General Elective                

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

Junior Year

 

KINE 3520 Applied Exercise Physiology

3

KINE 3530 Exercise Physiology Lab

1

PHYS 2070 Physics I 

5

Exercise Physiology Elective 

3

General Elective      

3

 

 

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

KINE 4540 Applied Biomechanics

3

KINE 4550 Applied Biomechanics Lab

1

KINE 4850 Clin. Exer. Test/Prog.

3

KINE 4860 Clin. Exer. Test/Prog. Lab

1

PHYS 2080 Physics II

5

Multicultural Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

Senior Year

 

RESM 4100 Statistics 

3

HEAL 4700 Nutrition  

3

KINE  4560  Lab Tech in Ex Phys

3

KINE  4870  Exercise Biology

3

KINE 4990 Independent Study

3

Exercise Physiology Elective

3

 

 

Total 18 hours

 

 

KINE 4910 Senior Research Project

4

COMM 3840 Interpersonal Comm.

4

Exercise Physiology Electives

6

General Electives

3

 

 

Total 17 hours

 

 

Exercise Physiology Concentration Electives include:  CHEM 2410 Organic Chemistry I, CHEM 2460 Organic Chemistry I Lab,
CHEM 2420 Organic Chemistry II, CHEM 2470 Organic Chemistry II Lab,  KINE 4250 Readings in Exercise Biology,
CHEM 3510 Biochemistry I, CHEM 3520 Biochemistry II, BIOL 3010 Molecular Genetics, BIOL 3030 Cell Biology,
BIOL 3090 Developmental Biology, BIOL 4010 Molecular Biology, BIOL 4050 Immunology, BIOL 4060 Immunology Lab

Pre-Physical Therapy
The pre-physical therapy concentration provides students with the opportunity to complete the B.S.E.S. degree and prepare for admission into a graduate entry-level physical therapy program. The curriculum provides a mix of science and health related courses and clinical experiences that are intended to provide the ideal preparation for admission into the university's doctorate in physical therapy program, as well as meet the admission requirements for similar programs across the country.  Many students who complete the program will apply for admission to the University of Toledo’s Doctorate in Physical Therapy program, which has long been affiliated with this program. All physical therapy programs involve a competitive admission process. Thus, completion of the pre-physical therapy option at UT does not guarantee acceptance to a physical therapy program.

Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science - Pre-Physical Therapy Degree Requirements

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

BIOL 2150 Fund Life Science I

4

BIOL 2160 Fund Life Science I Lab

1

MATH 1340 College Algebra/Trig. 

4

KINE 1700 Intro to Exercise Science

2

HHS 1000 Orientation

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

BIOL 2170 Fund Life Science II      

4

BIOL 2180 Fund Life Science II Lab

1

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology

3

HHS 2980 PMD Clinical     

3

HEAL 1500 First Aid   

2

ENGL 1110 English Comp I.  

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

Sophomore Year

 

CHEM 1230 General Chemistry I

4

CHEM 1280 General Chemistry I Lab

1

KINE 2510 Human Anatomy

3

KINE 2520 Human Anatomy Lab

1

ENGL 2950 Sci and Tech Report Writing

3

Social Science Elective

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology 

3

CHEM 1240 General Chemistry II   

4

CHEM 1290 General Chemistry II Lab

1

KINE 2530 Human Physiology      

3

KINE 2540 Human Physiology Lab

1

Multicultural Elective

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

Junior
 Year *

 

KINE 2960 Growth Devel. & Motor Lng

4

KINE 3520 Applied Exercise Physiology    

3

KINE 3530 Appl. Exercise Physiol. Lab

1

PHYS 2070 Physics I

5

PSY 2200, 2510 or 2700

3

 

 

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

 

Communication (select one)

3 or 4

COMM 3840 Interpersonal Comm.(4)

 

COMM 1010 Comm. Prin. & Practices (3)

 

 

PHYS 2080 Physics II

5

KINE 4620 Therapuetic Kinesiology

3

KINE 2580 Pathophysiology

3

 

 

Total 14 or 15 hours

 

Senior Year

 

KINE 4540 Applied Biomechanics

3

KINE 4550 Applied Biomechanics Lab

1

RESM 4100 Educational Statistics

3

HEAL 4560 Health Problems of Aging

3

Pre PT Elective                       

3

General Elective**

3

Total 16 hours

 

 

HEAL 4700 Nutrition Science

3

KINE 4640 Neuro and Patho of Rehab

3

KINE 4910 Senior Research Project

4

Multi Cultural Elective

3

Pre PT Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

           
Pre-PT Electives include: HHS 4980 PMD Clinical, KINE 3730 Fitness Asses & Programming, KINE 4850 Clinical Exercise Test and Prog, KINE 4860 Clin Ex Test and ........Prog Lab, KINE 4940 Pre-PT Internship,  KINE 4990 Independent Study in Exer Sci, or other by approval of an adviser  **General Electives as needed to meet the 124 credit hour graduation requirement.

Pre-Physician Assistant

Students planning to enter a physician assistant program after graduation should identify the programs to which they may apply. The specific admission requirements for those programs should be determined. If the requirements are not already among the above required courses, they should be included among the supporting electives.

Required: 17 credits

CHEM 2410          

Organic Chemistry I                               

3 credits

CHEM 2460          

Organic Chemistry I Lab                        

1 credit

PHIL 3370             

Medical Ethics                                        

3 credits

HEAL 1800           

Medical Terminology                             

3 credits

BIOL 4030             

Microbiology                                         

3 credits

BIOL 4040             

Microbiology Lab                                  

1 credit

PSY 2510              

Lifespan Dev. Psych                              

3 credits

Supporting Electives: Electives: 15 credits (minimum)

BIOL 3030             

Cell Biology                                           

3 credits

BIOL 4110             

Human Genetics                                     

3 credits (prereq. BIOL 3030)

CHEM 3510          

Biochemistry I                                        

3 credits

MATH 1750          

Calculus for Life Sci. I                           

4 credits

PHYS 2080           

Physics II                                               

5 credits

CHEM 2420          

Organic Chemistry                 

3 credits

CHEM 2470          

Organic Chemistry II Lab                      

1 credit

CHEM 3520          

Biochemistry II                                      

3 credits

BIOL 3010             

Molecular Genetics                                

3 credits

BIOL 3020             

Molecular Genetics Lab                         

1 credit

BIOL 4050             

Immunology                                           

3 credits

BIOL 4060             

Immunology Lab                                    

1 credit

KINE 2580            

Human Pathophysiology                        

3 credits

KINE 2590            

Microbio & Infect Disease                     

3 credits

KINE 4560            

Lab Tech in Exer Physio                        

3 credits

KINE 4640            

Nuero & Patho of Rehab                        

3 credits

KINE 4850            

Exer Testing & Program                        

3 credits

KINE 4860            

Exer. Testing & Pro. Lab                       

1 credit

KINE 4870            

Exercise Biology                                    

3 credits

HEAL 3300           

Drug Awareness                                    

3 credits

HEAL 3600           

Prev. & Cont. of Disease                       

3 credits

HEAL 3700           

Fnds. of Human Sexuality                     

3 credits

HEAL 3800           

Death and Dying                                    

3 credits

PSY 2200              

Abnormal Psychology                           

3 credits

PSY 2600              

Psychobiology                                       

3 credits

HHS 2980              

Spec Topics – PMD Clinic                    

3 credits

HHS 4980              

Spec Topics – PMD Clinic                    

3 credits 

Optional (Self-Designed)
Students who are interested in a degree in exercise science but would like to develop a concentration in a unique area many enroll in the optional program. For instance, a student may plan to enter a professional or graduate degree program in an area with specific undergraduate prerequisites that are not included in any of the departmental concentrations. Another example is a student whose personal interests could best be served by a custom-designed concentration. Any student in the B.S.E.S. program may elect to develop an optional concentration, in lieu of one of the structured concentrations. These optional concentrations are developed around a theme related to exercise science and are designed in collaboration with a departmental faculty adviser. The student must file with the student services office of the College of Health Science and Human Service an optional program plan of study that has been approved by the student’s adviser and the chair of the kinesiology department. Students have used the optional program for admission into graduate programs in fields such as physician assistant, occupational therapy, physical therapy, therapeutic recreation, medicine, medical and health-related sales, public health and many other fields related to health and human physical performance.

Minor in Exercise Science
A minor in exercise science is offered by the department of kinesiology to provide students from other departments across the University with the opportunity to gain experience in this area. The minor requires 22 credits of course work, including required lecture and lab courses in human anatomy, physiology, exercise physiology, and biomechanics, as well as elective courses taken from a variety of areas within exercise science. Students interested in completing the minor in exercise science should contact the department’s academic adviser for additional information.

Required: 16 hours

KINE      

2510       

Human Anatomy*                                        

3

KINE      

2520       

Human Anatomy Lab*                                 

1

KINE      

2530       

Human Physiology*                                     

3

KINE      

2540       

Human Physiology Lab*                               

1

KINE      

3520       

Applied Exercise Physiology                       

3

KINE      

3530       

Applied Exercise Physiology Lab                

1

KINE      

4540       

Applied Biomechanics                                 

3

KINE      

4550       

Applied Biomechanics Lab                           

1

Elective:  6 hours

KINE      

1110       

Introduction to Athletic Training                 

2

KINE      

2960       

Growth, Development & Motor Learning   

4

KINE      

3510       

Introduction to Kinesiotherapy                    

3

KINE      

3530       

Applied Exercise Physiology Laboratory    

1

KINE      

3730       

Fitness Assessment and Programming        

2

KINE      

4550       

Applied Biomechanics Laboratory              

1

KINE      

4560       

Laboratory Techniques in Exercise Physiology

3

KINE      

4850       

Clinical Testing and Programming              

3

KINE      

4860       

Clinical Testing and Programming Lab       

1

KINE      

4870       

Exercise Biology                                          

3

KINE      

4920       

Readings in Exercise Biology                      

3

KINE      

4990       

Independent Study                                    

1 to 3

*Courses can be waived if the student has successfully completed comparable anatomy and physiology course work in another department within or outside The University of Toledo.

**Students will be required to meet all of the prerequisites and corequisites for the elective courses in the minor.

 

Respiratory Care Program
Craig Black, program coordinator
Respiratory care is an allied health specialty. Respiratory care practitioners work with physicians in the treatment, management, control, diagnostic evaluation and care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities associated with the cardiopulmonary system.
Respiratory therapists treat a diverse group of patients ranging from newborn and pediatric patients to adults and the elderly. Disease states or conditions often requiring respiratory care include asthma, emphysema, chronic obstructive lung disease, pneumonia, cystic fibrosis, infant respiratory distress syndrome and conditions brought on by shock, trauma or post-operative surgical complications. Respiratory therapists also are involved in many specialty areas in the hospital, such as newborn labor and delivery, neonatal and pediatric intensive care units, pulmonary function laboratory, sleep laboratory and adult intensive care units. The baccalaureate degree prepares respiratory therapists to deliver respiratory care in the hospital, home and alternate care sites.
The respiratory therapist with an earned baccalaureate is an advanced-level practitioner who is eligible to sit for the national board exam for entry-level certification, to become registered as an advanced practitioner, and to take specialty examinations in perinatal/pediatrics and pulmonary function technology.

Selective Admissions Requirements

Acceptance into the respiratory care program is limited due to the number of students who can be accommodated by the faculty and clinical facilities. Once admitted to the University, students must file a separate application for the respiratory care program with the college selective admissions committee.  Selective admission criteria are listed below.
 Complete the following courses (or their equivalent or higher) with a grade of C or better: ENGL 1110 College Composition I; ENGL 1130 College Composition II; HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology; CHEM 1120 Chemistry for Health Sciences; and KINE 2560 Anatomy & Physiology I, and KINE 2460 Anatomy & Physiology I Lab; and KINE 2570 Anatomy & Physiology II, and KINE 2470 Anatomy & Physiology II Lab, Math 1320 (College Algebra), and KINE 2590 (Microbiology and Infectious Diseases).
 Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 (college or higher education).

  • In addition to cumulative GPA, the student's GPA in the courses fulfilling the math and science prerequisite course requirements (MATH 1320, CHEM 1120, KINE 2460, 2470, 2560, 2570, and 2590) will be evaluated.
The most recent version of the selective admission criteria may be accessed on the Respiratory Care Program Web page at www.hhs.utoledo.edu/respiratorycare/admissionreq.html.

 

Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Care

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed in the baccalaureate respiratory care program of study chart.

Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Care – Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Freshman Year

 

HHS 1000 College Orientation

1

MATH 1320 College Algebra

3

KINE 2560 Anatomy & Physiology I

3

KINE 2460 Anatomy & Physiology I Lab      

1

HEAL 1800 Medical Terminology 

3

ENGL 1110 College Composition I

3

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

 

ENGL 1130 or higher College Comp II

3

PHIL   1020 Critical Thinking        

3

KINE  2570 Anatomy & Physiology II

3

KINE  2470 Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

1

CHEM 1120 Chemistry for Health Sciences

4

 

 

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

 

 

Sophomore Year

 

KINE 2590 Microbiology & Inf. Diseases       

3

HEAL 3800 Death & Dying             

3

CMPT 1100 Computer Info. Applications   

3

Professional Support Elective (see list)        

3

Multicultural Elective

3

 

 

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

HEAL 4700 Nutrition Science                        

3

PHIL 3370 Medical Ethics

3

PSY 1010 Introduction to Psychology   

3

Professional Support Elective (see list)

3

Humanities Elective 

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

RCBS 3010 Respiratory Care Fundamentals 

4

RCBS 3020 Respiratory Care Practice I

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total 8 hours

 

Junior
Year

 

RCBS 3110 Resp. Care Therapeutics I

4

RCBS 3120 Resp. Care Practice II

7

RCBS 3130 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics I 

4

                       

 

 

 

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

RCBS 3210 Resp. Care Therapeutics II  

4

RCBS 3220 Respiratory Care Practice III     

7

RCBS 3230 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics II

3

Social Science Elective

3

 

 

                       

 

Total 17 hours

 

 

Senior Year

 

RCBS 4140 Integrated Clinical Practice I

4

RCBS 4150 Neonatal/Pediatric Resp. Care

4

RCBS 4160 Clinical Assessment

3

RCBS 4700 Res, Analysis in Resp. Care

3

 

 

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

 

RCBS 3300 Adv. Cardiac Life Support

1

RCBS 4240 Integrated Clinical Practice II

3

RCBS 4510 Resp. Care in Alternate Sites

3

RCBS 4800 Issues in Prof. Practice

3

RCBS 4810 Prep. For Prof. Practice

1

Multicultural Elective

3

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

 

                                           Professional Support Electives (choose 2)
HEAL 2500 Personal Health                                                                        HCAR 4360 Quality Assurance in Health Care
HEAL 2700 Community Health                                                                    HCAR 4510 Medical and Legal Aspects of Health Care
HEAL 3500 Environmental Health                                                               HCAR 4530 Problem Solving in the Health Care Environment
HEAL 4560 Health Problems of Aging                                                        HCAR 4550 Health Care Finance
HEAL 4800 Public Health Research & Statistics                                         RCBS 4740 Polysomnography I
HIM    3200 Health Care Resources, Payers & Consumers                          RCBS 4760 Polysomnography II

 

Respiratory Care Degree Completion Track (R.R.T. to B.S.R.T.)

The program is designed as a nontraditional track for individuals who have completed an associate’s degree in respiratory care and have already earned the Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) credential granted by the National Board for Respiratory Care. The program includes upper division professional courses, which are contained in the traditional bachelor’s program, but allows for student selection of an area of specialization to enhances professional growth. In addition, the professional support courses encompass many issues in health care and health education that are relevant to the practicing professional.

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements for Completion Track
To complete the bachelor of science degree in respiratory care, a student must take 124 semester hours and maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 at the University of Toledo.  A minimum of 64 hours must be taken at the 2000 to 4000 levels, with a minimum of 32 hours at the 3000 and 4000 levels. The following are the R.R.T. to B.S. degree completion track curriculum requirements:

Requirement         

Hours

University Core Curriculum   

27-30

Lower Division Professional Courses   

30-35

Upper Division Professional Courses    

13

Required Professional Courses (7)        

 

Area of Specialization (6)

 

Professional Support Courses

22

General electives    

21-26

Minimum total hours              

124

Required Courses (7 hours)

RCBS      

4160       

Clinical Assessment                                                   

3

RCBS      

3300       

Advanced Cardiac Life Support                                   

1

RCBS      

4700       

Research Analysis in Respiratory Care                        

3

Area of Specialization (Select a minimum of 6 hours)

RCBS      

4150       

Neonatal/Pediatric Respiratory Care                             

4

RCBS      

3230       

Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics II                                  

3

RCBS      

4510       

Respiratory Care in Alternate Sites                              

3

RCBS      

4800       

Issues in Professional Practice                                     

3

RCBS      

4740       

Polysommography I                                                     

3

RCBS      

4760       

Polysommography II                                                    

3

Professional Support Courses
Required Professional Support Courses (16 hours)

HCAR     

4360       

Quality Assurance in Health Care                                

3

HCAR     

4530       

Problem Solving in the Health Care Environment  

4

HCAR     

4510       

Medical and Legal Aspects of Health Care                   

3

HCAR     

4550         

Health Care Finance                                                     

3

PHIL       

3370       

Medical Ethics                                                             

3

Professional Support Electives (6 hours)

HEAL     

3500       

Environmental Health                                                  

3

HEAL     

3800       

Death and Dying                                                          

3

HEAL     

4560       

Health Problems of Aging                                           

3

HEAL     

4700       

Nutritional Science                                                      

3

HEAL     

4800       

Public Health Research and Statistics                         

3

HIM          

3200        

Healthcare Resources, Payers & Consumers    

3

General Electives                                                                       21-26

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Department of Military Science and Leadership



Army ROTC (U.S. Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps)
Jonathan Beasley, Chair
The University of Toledo offers undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity to qualify as commissioned officers in the United States Army, Army Reserves or Army National Guard. As a college elective, the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program provides preparation for leadership in any profession – military or civilian.
Army ROTC Basic Course
No military obligation is incurred for non-scholarship students participating in or completing the basic course.  The Basic Course is normally completed during the freshman and sophomore years and provides the student with a general knowledge of the military’s role in society and the missions of the Army. Subjects include leadership, land navigation, marksmanship, first aid and other basic military skills. Students enroll in one Military Science and Leadership (MSL) course each semester. It is possible for a sophomore to complete the basic course in one year through prior arrangement with the department.  Successful completion of the basic course is a prerequisite for enrollment in the Army ROTC Advanced Course. Selected sophomores and juniors also can qualify for the Advanced Course by completing ROTC Leader's Training Course in the summer, or through prior military service, either Active, Reserve or National Guard.
Army ROTC Advanced Course
The Advanced Course is the professional phase of the Army ROTC program. The Advanced Course includes subjects in leadership, training, land navigation, management, ethics, military justice and military tactics. During the two years of the Advanced Course, students enroll in one MSL course per semester. They also must complete one course from an academic department other than MSL in each of the following areas: written communication skills, military history and computer literacy. A list of approved courses is available from the Department of Military Science and Leadership. Two scheduled weekend field training exercises are required each year, and all students must meet Army physical fitness standards. All Advanced Course students must attend the five-week Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) at Fort Lewis, Wa. Students normally attend LDAC during the summer between their junior and senior years.
Upon satisfactory completion of the Advanced Course requirements and the awarding of the bachelor’s or graduate degree, the student is eligible for a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army, Army Reserve or Army National Guard.
Army ROTC Scholarships
The ROTC program offers four-year, three-year and two-year scholarships to qualified students. An Army ROTC scholarship normally covers all required academic fees and charges at The University of Toledo. Four-year and three-year advanced designee (A.D.) winners also receive a room and board incentive from the University.  All scholarship awards include an allowance for textbooks and supplies and a monthly spending allowance for up to 10 months per year during the scholarship period. Additional locally funded scholarships are available for a limited number of Cadets. Students may inquire about Army ROTC scholarships by contacting the Department of Military Science and Leadership.
General Eligibility Requirements
To enroll in the Army ROTC program, the student must:
1.     Be of good moral character.
2.     Be a citizen of the United States. (Non-citizens may enroll by special request at the Basic Course level.)
3.     Be enrolled as a full-time student at The University of Toledo or at a participating partnership university.
4.     Execute an oath of loyalty to the United States.
5.     Not be a conscientious objector.

Additional requirements exist for Advanced Course participation. Contact the Department of Military Science and Leadership for specific information.
Uniforms and Textbooks
Army uniforms, equipment, textbooks and materials necessary for MSL courses are loaned to students or provided at minimal cost.

Special Opportunities
Selected students participating in the Army ROTC program may attend airborne, air assault, mountain warfare, northern warfare, sapper or scuba training.  Selected students can compete for Cultural, Medical and Engineering internships over the summer months.  In addition, selected students are offered the opportunity to participate in Cadet Troop Leadership Training and spend three weeks performing the duties of an Officer at an Army installation. Students in the Advanced Course may elect to serve as officer trainees in local Army National Guard and Army Reserve units, thereby receiving additional training, experience and financial support while attending college.

Credit for Previous Military Training
Students with previous military training may be granted constructive credit as follows:
1.   By transfer. Constructive credit will be granted at the time of entrance to The University of Toledo for corresponding military science courses completed satisfactorily in a senior division ROTC unit in another college or university.
2.   Other training or service. Constructive credit will be granted at the time the student enters the Army ROTC program at The University of Toledo. If for any reason the student does not complete the ROTC program, this credit will be withdrawn.
a.  Service academy education. Students who have satisfactorily completed work at a service academy may receive constructive credit for up to three years of military science. The department will make a credit determination at the time that the student enrolls.
b. Active service or active duty for training (ADT) in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve, Army National Guard, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. The Professor of Military Science may grant constructive credit for up to two years of the Basic Course.
c. Junior ROTC or military school training. Students who have had Junior ROTC or military school training should contact the professor of military science for credit determinations. Maximum allowable constructive credit will be the two-year basic course.
d. Successful completion of ROTC Leaders Training Course provides credit for the on-campus Basic Course. Students may qualify for the leaders training course if they have two or more years of study remaining at either the undergraduate or graduate level and if they meet the other eligibility requirements. The Leader's Training Course is conducted at Fort Knox, Kentucky.
Minor in Military Science
Students seeking a minor in military science must successfully complete 25 hours of military science courses, with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Requirements in certain majors and curricula will require ROTC students to take more than the minimum number of hours required for graduation. When finalizing their program, students should consult an academic adviser within the department of their declared major.
Following are the requirements for the minor in military science:
1.   Six credit hours at the Basic Course level;
2.   18 credit hours at the Advanced Course level;
3.   One credit hour in a MSL elective at the 3000 level or higher, and
4.   Minimum GPA of 2.0 in MSL classes.

Military Science Courses

 

 

Hours

Basic Course:

 

 

 

MSL       

1010       

Leadership and Personal Development (fall) 

2

MSL       

1020       

Introduction to Tactical Leadership (spring)

2

MSL       

1030       

Introduction to Physical Fitness                                               

1

MSL       

1040       

Physical Fitness                                                      

1

MSL       

2010       

Innovative Team Leadership (fall)                               

3

MSL       

2020       

Foundations of Tactical Leadership (spring)

3

MSL       

2030       

Physical Training I                                                  

1

MSL       

2040       

Physical Training II                                                

1

MSL       

2200       

Leader's Training Course (summer)                

3

Advanced Course:

 

 

 

MSL       

3010       

Adaptive Tactical Leadership (fall)                               

3

MSL       

3020       

Leadership in Changing Environments (spring)           

3

MSL       

3030       

Physical Fitness Planning I                                     

1

MSL       

3040       

Physical Fitness Planning II                                    

1

MSL       

3600       

Airborne Operations (summer)                                               

1

MSL       

3700       

Cadet Troop Leadership Training (summer)                

1

MSL       

3800       

Air Assault Operations (summer)                                               

1

MSL       

3850       

Leader Development and Assessment Course(summer)

3                             

MSL       

4010       

Developing Adaptive Leaders (fall)                               

3

MSL       

4020       

Leadership in a Complex World (spring)                   

3

MSL       

4030       

Advanced Physical Fitness Planning I                              

1

MSL       

4040       

Advanced Physical Fitness Planning II                            

1

MSL       

4800       

Gettysburg: A Military History (fall) (or approved alternative)

3

Courses in bold are required in order to receive a commission in the U.S. Army, Army Reserve or Army National Guard. Interested students should contact the Department of Military Science and Leadership at 419.530.2681 or visit the Web site at http://hhs.utoledo.edu/armyrotc/

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Department of Rehabilitation Sciences



Michelle Masterson, chair

Occupational Therapy Program
Julie Jepsen Thomas, program coordinator
The program in occupational therapy is primarily on the graduate level.  Pre-occupational therapy programs are provided in the department of kinesiology and the department of health and recreation professions.  In addition, student wishing to explore occupational therapy as a career option should enroll in

OCCT 2550 Purposeful Living: the Role of Occupational Therapy        3 credits

Physical Therapy Program
Michelle Masterson, program coordinator
The program in physical therapy is on the graduate level.  A pre-physical therapy concentration in the undergraduate exercise science major is provided in the department of kinesiology.

 

Speech-Language Pathology Program
Lori Pakulski, program coordinator

The program provides course work in communication disorders which prepares the student for graduate work in speech-language pathology. The strengths of the program include supervised clinical experiences on the undergraduate level, undergraduate foundations in normal speech processes and language development, and introductory courses in communication disorders. A master’s degree is one of the requirements for licensure and certification as a speech-language pathologist.

 

Bachelor of Science in Speech-Language Pathology Degree Requirements

Students should follow and complete the degree requirements as displayed in the speech-language pathology program of study chart.  

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

SLP 2400 Intro to Communication Disorders

3

MATH 1320 College Algebra                       

3

SOC 1010 Intro to Sociology       

3

ENGL 1110 College Composition I 

3

HHS 1000 College Orientation

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

 

KINE 2560 Anatomy & Physiology

3

KINE 2460 Anatomy & Physiology I Lab

1

PSY 1010 Principles of Psychology

3

ENGL 2960 or Composition II                       

3

HEAL 1800,2500,4560,COUN 3070 or 4080

3

General Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

Sophomore Year

 

SLP 3010 Clinical Phonetics

4

SLP 3020 Anat. & Phy of Comm Mechanism

4

SLP 3030 Normal Lang. Acquisition

3

HEAL 1500 First Aid

2

General Elective 

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

 

SLP 3140 Analyzing Language

4

SLP 3150 Speech Science

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

Natural Science Elective

3

General Elective

3

 

 

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

Junior
Year

 

SLP 3200 Articulation/Phono Disorders       

4

SLP 3170 Hearing Science

2

Multicultural Elective

3

General Elective

6

 

 

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

SLP 3300 Language Disorders

4

SLP 3800 Methods for Clinical Intervention

3

HEAL 1800,2500,4560,COUN 2220 or 4080

3

Multicultural Elective

3

General Elective

3

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

Senior Year

 

SLP 3400 Audiology

3

SLP 4000 Beginning Clinical Practicum

2

SPED 2040

3

General Electives

7

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

SLP 4300 Adv. Clinical Prac. I

2

SLP 4350 Concomitant Disorders

3

SPED 4110 or 4120 Mod/Int Needs

3

General Electives

6

 

 

Total 14 hours

 

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Department of School Psychology, Legal Specialties and Counselor Education



Martin Ritchie, chair
Degree Programs
Minor in Counseling
Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies
Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Paralegal Studies
Nurse Paralegal Certificate
Minor in Legal Specialties
Honors in Legal Specialties

Counselor Education Program


Martin Ritchie, program coordinator

Minor in Counseling
The Counseling Minor would allow undergraduates to learn basic concepts and skills used in the counseling profession including counseling theories and skills, substance abuse treatment and prevention and case management.  The minor will not lead to licensure or certification but will be a sound foundation for students wishing to pursue a master's degree in counseling.

The counseling Minor requires a minimum of 21 semester hours as follows:

CESP Required Core Course (4 hours)

 

COUN 1110 Fundamentals of Human Mental Health                                           

4 credit hours

 

 

CESP Electives (17 hours)

 

Atleast 8 hours must be at 3000 or 4000 level

 

COUN 1240 Substance Abuse Issues in Mental Health                                        

3 credit hours

COUN 2120 Group and Therapeutic Approaches                                                 

4 credit hours

COUN 2220 Family Theories & Cultural Influences in Mental Health                 

3 credit hours

COUN 3110 Case Management in Mental Health                                                 

3 credit hours

COUN 3140 Substance Abuse Prevention & Community Program                      

3 credit hours

COUN 3150 Models of Treatment for Substance Abuse                                      

3 credit hours

COUN 3220 Theories in Mental Health                                                                

3 credit hours

COUN 4120 Dual Diagnosis: Substance Abuse & Mental Illness                        

3 credit hours

COUN 4080 Essentials of Helping                                                                        

3 credit hours

 

Legal Specialties Programs


Kathleen Reed, program coordinator

Undergraduate programs related to the legal profession are found in this department. Programs include academic course work and practical experiences designed to develop the knowledge and critical thinking and communication skills necessary for contribution to the legal profession. All of the department faculty are licensed attorneys, judges and magistrates and are available for career advising.

Paralegal Studies Programs

A dynamic field of study, the legal specialties program in paralegal studies prepares students to be an integral part of the legal team, working under the supervision and direction of attorneys. Paralegals assist attorneys by conducting interviews and investigations, researching cases, drafting legal documents, and assisting at real estate closings, depositions and trials.  All degree and certificate programs hold prestigious American Bar Association approval.

The U.S. Department of Labor projects the paralegal profession will be one of the ten fastest growing professions through the year 2014.  CNNMoney.com lists “paralegal” as one of its top 50 jobs.  Career sources conclude that there will be an 85% increase in paralegal employment over the next eight years.  Graduates find rewarding career opportunities in a variety of settings, including large and small law firms, corporate legal departments, banks, court systems, and government offices.

Prelaw Studies

Noparticular degree is required for admission to law school. Successful law students must possess good communication, logic and analytical skills, and have a fundamental understanding of the legal system. The paralegal studies program provides students with an excellent “pre-law” program by teaching those important skills. Graduates with a bachelor degree in paralegal studies who meet certain criteria will receive guaranteed admission to The University of Toledo College of Law. All of the faculty in the paralegal studies program are licensed attorneys, judges and magistrates and are available for career advising. Contact the department office at 419.530.7746 for more information.

Bachelor of Science – Paralegal Program Degree Requirements

American Bar Association Approved Program

The bachelor of science degree prepares students for an exciting career in the law at a higher level of responsibility. In addition, the bachelor degree in paralegal studies is an excellent “pre-law” track for those considering law school.  Graduates with a bachelor degree in paralegal studies who meet certain criteria will receive guaranteed admission into UT’s College of Law. 

Students should complete the degree requirements as displayed in their program of study and the following suggested schedule.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Freshman Year

 

ENGL 1110 College Composition I

3

LGL 1010 Introduction to Law

3

LGL 1720 Law Practice Mgmt

3

MATH 1320 College Algebra

3

LGL 2120 Real Estate Transactions

3

HHS 1000 College Orientation

1

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

 

ENGL 1130 or higher College Comp II

3

LGL 1160 Legal Research

3

LGL 1150 Tort Law

3

CMPT 1100 Computer Info. Applications or BUAD 1020 MicroComputer Applications   

Social Science Elective

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

Sophomore Year

 

LGL 2020 Civil Procedure      

3

LGL 2130 Family Law

3

LGL 2700 Advocacy:  Mock Trial

3

BUAD 2040 Financial Acct. Information

3

Social Science Elective

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

LGL   2110 Estate & Probate Admin.   

3

LGL   2210 Prac. & Prod. Of Admin Law

3

PHIL 1020 Critical Thinking

3

Humanities Elective

3

Elective

3

   

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

Junior
Year

 

LGL 3030 Adv. Legal Research/Writing

3

LGL 3050 Bankruptcy Pract & Cons Appl

3

PHIL elective at 3000/4000 level

3

Legal Specialty Option

3

Natural Science Elective

3

Natural Science Elective Lab   

1

 

 

Total 16 hours

 

 

LGL 3010 Law of Business Associations  

3

LGL 3330 Litigation                                               

3

LGL 4130 Clinical Experience    

3

Legal Specialty Option                                    

3

Multicultural Elective                                               

3

Natural Science Elective                                  

3

 

 

   
   

Total 18 hours

 

Senior Year

 

LGL 4030 Contract Law

3

LGL 3350 Alternative Dispute Resolution

3

PHIL elective at 3000/4000 level

3

Legal Specialty Option

3

Elective

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

LGL 4940 Advanced Paralegal Internship

3

Legal Specialty Option

3

Multicultural Elective

3

Elective

3

Elective

3

   

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Paralegal Studies - Degree Requirements

(American Bar Association Approved Program. To be accepted into this program, students must have at least a four-year bachelor degree)

Students should follow and complete the certificate requirements as displayed.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Year One

 

LGL 1010 Introduction to Law    

3

LGL 1720 Law Practice Mgmt      

3

LGL 2020 Civil Procedure               

3

LGL 2120 Real Estate Transactions               

3

LGL xxxx  Law Elective *             

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

LGL 1150 Tort Law

3

LGL 1160 Legal Research, Wrtg & Case

3

LGL 2110 Estate & Probate Admin

3

LGL 2940 Paralegal Internship **

3

LGL xxxx  Law Elective *

3

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

* Law Electives (choose two from list below)
LGL 2210 Practice & Procedures in Administrative Law
LGL 2130 Family Law (Prereq: LGL:1010 and LGL:1160 )
LGL 2700 Advocacy: Mock Trial
LGL 3010 Law of Business Associations (Prereq: LGL:1010 and LGL:1720)
LGL 3030 Advanced Legal Research and Writing (Prereq: LGL:1010 and LGL:1160)
LGL 3050 Bankruptcy Practices & Consumer Applications (Prereq: LGL:1010 and LGL:1160)
LGL 3330 Litigation (Prereq: LGL:1150 and LGL:2020)
LGL 3350 Alternative Dispute Resolution (Prereq: LGL:1010, LGL:1150 and LGL:2020)
LGL 4030 Contract Law (Prereq: LGL:1010 and LGL:1160)
LGL 4130 Clinic Experience (Prereq: LGL:1010, LGL:1160)

**Although the Paralegal Internship may be taken by post-baccalaureate certificate students during their   second semester, it is strongly suggested that it be taken alone, in the student’s third semester.

Nurse Paralegal Certificate Degree Requirements

American Bar Association Approved Program

The nurse paralegal certificate program prepares practicing nurses for careers in law where medical education and experience are needed. Examples of these areas of the law are medical malpractice, personal injury, workers compensation, wrongful death and social security.

Students should complete the degree requirements as displayed in their program of study and the following suggested schedule.

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Year One

 

LGL 1010 Introduction to Law

3

LGL 1720 Law Practice Mgmt

3

LGL 2020 Civil Procedure

3

 

 

Total 9 hours

 

 

LGL 1150 Tort Law

3

LGL 1160 Legal Research, Wrtg &  Case Analysis  

3

LGL 2210 Administrative Law

3

   

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

 

LGL  2940  Internship 

3

   
   
   
   

 

 

Total 15 hours

 

Minor in Legal Specialties Requirements

Students should follow this suggested schedule:

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

 

LGL 1010 

Introduction to Law

3 Hours 

LGL 2120

Real Estate Law

3 Hours

LGL xxxx  

Law Elective

3 Hours

LGL xxxx  

Law Elective

3 Hours

                   

Total Hours

12 Hours

LGL 1150  

Tort Law

3 Hours

LGL xxxx  

Law Elective

3 Hours

LGL xxxx

Law Elective

3 Hours

     

 

 

 

                   

Total Hours

9 Hours

LGL   1160  Legal Research & Writing (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:1010)
LGL   2110  Estate & Probate Administration (3 hrs.)
LGL   2130  Family Law (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:1010 & LGL:1160)
LGL   2700  Advocacy:  Mock Trial (3 hrs.)
LGL   3010  Law of Business Associations (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:1010 & LGL:1720)
LGL   3110   Personal Law  (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. Junior Standing or Instructor Permission)
LGL   3120   Personal Law II (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:3120)
LGL   3350  Alternative Dispute Resolution (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:1010, LGL:1150 & LGL:2020)
LGL   4030  Contract Law (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:1010 & LGL:1160)
LGL   4230  Health Care & the Law (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. Junior Standing or Instructor Permission)

* Students will be responsible for meeting all of the prerequisites for the required courses in the minor.  Candidates for the minor must have their course work verified and approved by a legal specialties adviser or the department chair prior to application for graduation.

Honors in Legal Specialties

Tobe awarded, upon graduation, the citation “Honors in Legal Specialties” an admitted student must:

  1. Successfully complete 9 credit hours of LGL honors courses, and
  2. Maintain at least a cumulative GPA of 3.5 in the student’s entire paralegal studies program of study, and
  3. Submit, before applying for graduation, to the program director a portfolio of the students’ honor’s work for verification.

Students should register for the honors section of 3 courses from the following list, and consult with the paralegal studies instructors regarding the honors requirements in those courses.

LGL   3010  Law of Business Associations (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:1010 & LGL:1720)
LGL   3030  Advanced Legal Research & Writing (3 hrs.) (*Prereq.  LGL:1010 & LGL:1160)
LGL   3050  Bankruptcy Practices & Consumer Applications  (3 hrs.)  (*Prereq.  LGL:1010 & LGL:1160)
LGL   3110   Personal Law  (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. Junior Standing or Instructor Permission)
LGL   3120   Personal Law II (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:3120)
LGL   3330   Litigation  (3 hrs.)  (*Prereq.  LGL: 1150 & LGL:2020)
LGL   4030  Contract Law (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. LGL:1010 & LGL:1160)
LGL   4230  Health Care & the Law (3 hrs.) (*Prereq. Junior Standing or Instructor Permission)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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College of Health Science and Human Service Faculty



Department of Criminal Justice and Social Work

Ann Biddlestone, 2002, lecturer
B.A., M.S.W., The Ohio State University

David Browning, 1989, assistant professor
B.A., Bowling Green State University; M.Ed., The University of Toledo

Terry Cluse-Tolar, 1997, professor
A.B., Ohio University; M.S.W., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Martha Delgado, 1996, field director
B.A., Mary Manse College; M.S.W., University of Michigan

Janet M. Hoy, 2008, assistant professor
B.S.N., Bowling Green State University; M.S., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University