Africana Studies

Faculty


Angela Siner, Director of Africana Studies
Angela Siner Director of Africana Studies at UToledo

Angela M. Siner, M.A., is the director of The University of Toledo Africana Studies Program, and director of the Anthropology Program in the Sociology and Anthropology Department. Ms. Siner has a B.A. and M.A. in history from Grambling State University, and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (formerly University of Southwestern Louisiana), respectively. Her areas of interest include African history (pre-colonial and post-colonial), Black history, Black intellectual history, the Black family, the Black church, and Black women in America.

Email angela.siner@utoledo.edu
 
Affiliated Faculty

Asma Abdel-Halim Department of Women’s and Gender Studies

Asma Abdel-Halim
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
College of Arts and Letters

Email asma.abdel-halim@utoledo.edu

Asma M. Abdel Halim, Ph.D., is associate professor of women’s and gender studies. She graduated from the School of Law at the University of Khartoum in the Sudan with an LL.B. Honors in common law and Shari’a, Islamic law; she also earned a master’s degree in commercial law. Her research focuses on Muslim women’s rights in Africa with a focus on feminism, women’s issues, legal and human rights under socio-cultural and religious mandates. She is currently interested in researching Sudanese laws from a feminist perspective, tracing in particular the evolution of laws that affect women’s rights. 

Lesley M. Berhan, Department of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering

Dr. Lesley M. Berhan
Department of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering
College of Engineering

Email lesley.berhan@utoledo.edu

Lesley Berhan, Ph.D., is currently the associate dean for diversity, inclusion, and community engagement for the College of Engineering and an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering at The University of Toledo. Her research in engineering education focuses on issues related to student success, equity, access, and broadening participation in engineering. She joined the UToledo faculty in 2004.

Ben Davis, College of Law

Ben Davis
College of Law

 Email ben.davis@utoledo.edu

Professor Ben Davis has published dozens of articles on a wide range of topics related to international and domestic arbitration, online and offline dispute resolution, public and private international law, national security law, and contracts. He teaches in contracts, international law, international business transactions, commercial law, alternative dispute resolution, and international and domestic arbitration.

Rachel Dudley, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, College of Arts and Letters

Dr. Rachel Dudley
Department of Women’s and Gender Studies
College of Arts and Letters

Email rachel.dudley@utoledo.edu

Rachel Dudley, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of women’s and gender studies at The University of Toledo. Her research interests pertain to histories of slavery and medicine and—more broadly—to gender, race and the health humanities. She has also taught courses on Black feminist thought and gender, race and biomedicine. Dr. Dudley values interdisciplinary approaches to scholarship and teaching and she is proud to be an affiliated faculty member in Africana studies.

Kimberly Mack, Department of English Language and Literature, College of Arts and Letters

Dr. Kimberly Mack
Department of English Language and Literature
College of Arts and Letters

Email kimberly.mack@utoledo.edu

Kimberly Mack, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of English in the Department of English Language and Literature. Dr. Mack’s research focuses on the intersections of 20th and 21st century African American literature and American popular music. Her work engages canonical authors like Ralph Ellison and Alice Walker, innovative contemporary popular musicians such as Rhiannon Giddens and Gary Clark Jr., and diverse genres and theoretical approaches including fiction, memoir, autobiography, narratology, and racial and gender performance. Music is an integral part of the African American literary tradition; therefore, she examines African American literature and popular music, specifically the blues and rock, side by side.

Willie McKether, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of Arts and Letters, UToledo President’s Office

Dr. Willie McKether
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Arts and Letters, UToledo President’s Office

Email willie.mckether@utoledo.edu

Willie McKether, Ph.D., was named The University of Toledo’s vice president for diversity in June 2016. Formerly, he was associate dean in UToledo’s College of Languages, Literature and Social Sciences (now the College of Arts and Letters) and is an associate professor of anthropology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Dr. McKether’s academic areas of focus include African American migration and culture, as well as business anthropology and urban anthropology, with a focus on student retention and school culture.

Shingi Mavima, Department of History, College of Arts and Letters

Dr. Shingi Mavima
Department of History
College of Arts and Letters

Email blessing.mavima@utoledo.edu

Shingi Mavima, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of history who specializes in contemporary Southern African history with a focus on both its colonial and postcolonial periods. He has additional scholarly interests in African literature and popular culture. Dr. Mavima’s peer-reviewed publications have appeared on a wide range of subjects, from Afro-based traditions in Battle Rap to ethnic cleansing in 1980s Zimbabwe. Born and raised in Zimbabwe, he is the cofounder and executive director of CLUBHOUSE International, a non-profit organization dedicated to working with Zimbabwean primary school students in low-income suburbs.

Monita Mungo, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of Arts and Letters

Dr. Monita Mungo
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Arts and Letters

Email monita.mungo@utoledo.edu

Monita H. Mungo, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at The University of Toledo where she works diligently to unearth and disperse the myriad of ways society marginalizes, oppresses, distorts, ignores, silences, destroys, appropriates, and commodifies the voices of people of color generally, and Black folks specifically, and how this treatment serves as a barrier to educational achievement.

Michael Stauch, Department of History, College of Arts and Letters

Michael Stauch
Department of History
College of Arts and Letters

Email michael.stauch@utoledo.edu

Michael Stauch, Ph.D., is a historian of the modern United States and assistant professor of history. He is currently at work on a manuscript entitled The Age of Community Policing, currently under contract with the University of Pennsylvania Press. Dr. Stauch’s research explores the politics of policing, and the intersection of race, class, and age in urban settings.


 
Part-time Faculty

Malaika-Beauta Bell UToledo Office of Diversity and Inclusion and adjunct professor of Africana Studies

Malaika-Beauta Bell
Office of Diversity and Inclusion

 Email malaika-beauta.bell@utoledo.edu

Malaika-Beauta Bell is a two-time graduate of The University of Toledo. She has been working in the UToledo Office of Diversity and Inclusion since February of 2018 and feels lucky to have been able to teach for the Africana Studies Program since fall 2014 as an adjunct instructor. 

Malaika’s passion is the success of the students that she has the pleasure of connecting with!

Jill M. Humphries, Ph.D.,  assistant professor and part-time instructor for Africana Studies

Dr. Jill M. Humphries
Africana Studies Program
College of Arts and Letters

Email jill.humphries@utoledo.edu

Jill M. Humphries, Ph.D., is an assistant professor and a part-time instructor for Africana Studies. She is a 2019 Fulbright Specialist Scholar and a 2018 Ambassador’s Distinguished Scholar for Ethiopia, who is currently an international facilitator with the Govan Mbeki Research and Development Postgraduate Studies Centre at the University of Fort Hare in South Africa. She is a scholar activist with over 30-plus years of engagement in educational and racial social justice work pertaining to Africa and the Black Diaspora. Her research interests include public, private and nonprofit collaboration, transnational political organizing and technology, global racial, gender and sexuality formations, and environmental and legal studies. 

Edwina Teye, Ph.D., instructor, UToledo Africana Studies Program

Dr. Edwina Teye
Africana Studies Program
College of Arts and Letters

Email edwina.kofiopata@utoledo.edu

Edwina Teye, Ph.D., has taught for the Africana Studies program since 2017, where she teaches a course on African Women and the Environment. She graduated from The University of Toledo with a doctoral degree in Spatially Integrated Social Sciences (SISS). She holds a master’s degree in Political Science and another in International Affairs. Her interests center on the intersection of human interaction with the built and natural environment, with specific focus on land uses and the impact on water quality through a social science lens and environmental advocacy through conservation and stewardship.

Tiffany Preston Whitman, Ed.D.,  Director of Student Success Initiatives in the Office of the Provost, University of Toledo

Dr. Tiffany Preston Whitman
Student Success Initiatives
UToledo Office of the Provost

 Email tiffany.whitman@utoledo.edu

Tiffany Preston Whitman, Ed.D., serves as the Director of Student Success Initiatives in the Office of the Provost at The University of Toledo. Her areas of interest include African American culture and education and community-based education change. Dr. Whitman is a proud alumna of The Ohio State University’s African American and African Studies (B.A.) program that inspired her to help others gain a better understanding of the black experience.


 
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Last Updated: 9/14/20