The Ward M. Canaday Center

for Special Collections

The University of Toledo

Finding Aid

Dominick Labino, 1896-1993

MSS-223

Size: 12 ½ linear feet

Provenance: received from Baker O’Brien

Access: open/restricted

Related Collections:

Processing Note:

Copyright: The literary rights to this collection are assumed to rest with the person(s) responsible for the production of the particular items within the collection, or with their heirs or assigns.  Researchers bear full legal responsibility for the acquisition to publish from any part of said collection per Title 17, United States Code.  The Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collectionsmay reserve the right to intervene as intermediary at its own discretion.

Completed by: Julie Freniere, January 2009

Dominick Labino (1910-1987)
Inventor and Glass Technologist

            Dominick Labino started his career as an instrument maker for the Bacharach Instrument Company in Pittsburgh, and then he obtained a job with Owens-Illinois Glass Company, where his lifelong passion for glass began.  When he was in charge at the Owens-Illinois Glass Company milk-bottle plant, he set up small laboratories to formulate new glass batches and to fabricate small glass objects. In 1940s, Mr. Labino’s predecessor, Ben Alderson, taught him how to blow glass. He continued his career in the glass industry and joined Glass Fibers, Inc., which subsequently became L.O.F. Glass Fibers, which he held the positions of Vice President and Director of Research.  The company then became Johns-Manville Fiber Glass, where he served as Vice-President and Director of Research and Development until his retirement in 1965, but he remained affiliated as a research consultant.
            A talented researcher and inventor, Mr. Labino holds sixty patents in the U.S. and hundreds in foreign countries. He worked as a technical and scientific consultant to various glass companies and to several federal agencies, including the National Space Agency.  He invented pure silica fiber which was used in insulating tiles covering the space shuttle Columbia and the Apollo, Mercury, and Gemini spacecraft. Also, three of his glass fiber developments have served as insulation against the extreme temperatures encountered by Apollo Time Capsules.
He also developed new glass studio inventions which remain commonplace, such as the top burner furnace (which eliminated the need for a second glory hole), the creation of insulation materials that made annealing ovens more efficient, and his triple-hinged furnace door.  In 1963, Labino constructed a glass studio, which housed his new designs on his farm in Grand Rapids, Ohio. Only two years later, he had requested early retirement at the age of 54 to devote his full time to glass craftsmanship.
            Labino’s technical training facilitated his work as a glass innovator.  The unique combination of scientific knowledge and aesthetic inventiveness give the artist the ability to create extraordinary shapes, which give flashing light to his pieces, the range of intensities of color in his fused multicolored forms, often contained in clear glass casing, and varied surface qualities which create broken reflective lights or light-absorbing matte textures.  Although an innovator in form, Labino is probably best known for his use of color.  
            Labino achieved extraordinary color, color-relationship and subtle variation of tones in his pieces.  Few artists in the field are able to combine colors in the molten state because different colors react differently in the furnace in accordance with minor changes in temperature and oxygen often causing breakage. Despite the difficulty, Labino felt that “Color is one of the most important aspects of visual art…”  Labino formulated his own color compositions from raw materials, which resulted in unusual and exciting effects. With his knowledge of the chemistry of glass, he was able to create colors which were uniquely his own. 
His stunning use of color is evident in all his glass work, such examples include “Emergence” and “Vitrana.”  The clear glass sculpture “Emergence” features three “Break Through” ascending air trap funnels each emerging into a successively larger funnel.  The emerging funnel shaped inclusions are covered in a thin micro gold veiling.  The sculpture on appearance possesses a soft gold color until infused with light, at which time it changes to a vibrant red.  Labino created the glass mural “Vitrana” for the Toledo Museum of Art in 1969.  To create the piece Labino used an entirely new technique of casting molten glass into rectangular molds, inlaying different colors of glass free hand during the casting process to achieve the unique effects of each panel.  Subsequently, Labino created other glass mural for Columbus (Ohio) Gallery of Fine Arts (1971) and for the Riverside Hospital (1973).  Not only did Labino create unique works of art in his studio, but his work gave rise to The Studio Glass Movement.
            In 1962, shortly before he constructed his glass studio, Labino and Harvey Littleton conducted workshops at the Toledo Art Museum, in hope that they would transform glass making from an industrial medium to a medium for art.  Their collaboration resulted in practices and technologies that made it possible for individual artists to work with glass in small, non-industrial studios, thus encouraging unique pieces to be created in a personal studio rather than factory manufactured glass.  Because of this Labino is considered one of the fore-fathers of the Studio Glass Movement.  In 1968, Labino published his book, Visual Art in Glass which presented in word and illustration the development of glass as a medium for visual art. Because of his influential role in the movement, his work has been included in most historic Studio Glass exhibitions. Some of his one man shows include the Corning Museum’s Dominick Labino—A Retrospective Exhibition, 1964-1969 and Dominick Labino, Decade of Glass Craftsmanship, 1964-1974. Furthermore, Labino’s work is featured in collections of over sixty museums worldwide.
            Because of Labino’s influential work, he has received numerous awards and honors including being named honorary curator of the Toledo Museum of Art (1969). He also was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from BGSU (1970), the first Ohio Arts Council Award, and the Steuben Phoenix Award (1977), which is recognized as the most prestigious honor in the industry. Furthermore, Labino served as President of the Toledo Federation of Art Societies, the Craft Club of Toledo, the Glass Collector’s Club of Toledo, and the Maumee Kiwanis Club. In addition, Labino was named a Fellow of the American Ceramic Society (1973).  He was also a member of the American Ceramic Society, Society of Glass Technology (England), Toledo Technical Society, American Crafts Council, World Crafts Council, Ohio Designer-Craftsmen, Archaeological Institutes of America, and the Tile Club of Toledo.  He has also been included in Who’s Who in Ohio; Men of Science, and Who’s Who in American Art.
            As well as being an accomplished scientist and artist, Labino has also published numerous articles along with his book, Visual Art in Glass.  Labino mainly wrote articles for technical publications but one of his best known articles was published by the Corning Museum of Glass in its “Journal of Glass Studies” in 1966.  The article featured glassmaking in the ancient world, which intrigued Labino.  Particularily Labino was fascinated with the many surviving examples of ancient glass which were not technically understood.  He questioned how Egyptians could make fabricated core-formed glass bottles with the technology available. Thus in his article, Labino attempted to prove that the Egyptians of the 18th Dynasty (1500 B.C.) made hollow vessels on a sand core.  As a scientist, Labino felt impelled to investigate such mysteries in order to fully understand the medium of glass and transform it into art.
            Although he was a respected and revered artist, Labino’s views contrasted with many other artists, such as his friend Harvey Littleton.  Labino felt that understanding the fabrication process was imperative to making “glass art.”  While many artists felt that glass should be created free form without any constraints.  Labino observed, “If you want to make glass right it is very complicated, but many so-called artists do not want to be bothered by technology.”  In fact Labino felt an understanding of glass promoted creativity, “It takes years of study and experience to make good glass, but the exciting results which can be attained are well worth the effort necessary to achieve them.”
            In 1987, Dominick Labino died in his home in Grand Rapids at the age of 76.

Sources:

“Dominick Labino, 76, Artist And Inventor of Glass Works” The New York Times. Obituaries, 13 January 1987.  <http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9B0DE7DE173DF930A25752C0A961948260> Accessed 3 December 2008.

“Dominick Labino Marker” The Historical Marker Database, <http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=4026> Accessed 3 December 2008.

Labino, Dominick. A Decade of Glass Craftsmanship: 1964-1974.  Exhibition organized jointly by the Pilkington Glass Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum and the Toledo Museum of Art, 1974-1975. Catalogue Toledo: Toledo Museum of Art: 1974.

Labino, Dominick. Visual Art in Glass, Studies in Art Series. Dubuque, Iowa: WM. C. Brown Company Publishers, 1968.  

Page, Jutta-Annette. The Art of glass: Toledo Museum of Art. London: Toledo Museum of Art, in association with D Giles Limited: 2006, pg.85. 

 “Vitrana,” Toledo Museum of Art. <http://www.toledomuseum.org/Collection/Vitrana.htm> Accessed 3 December 2008.

“WBGU-PBS: Dominick Labino: The Man and his Art.”  WBGU. <http://www.wbgu.org/community/documentary/DominickLabino/Labino_index.html> Accessed 3 December 2008. 

Scope and Content Note

This collection mainly consists of Dominick Labino’s technical library but also contains papers, photographs, and artifacts. His papers are divided into six series: S1 Biographical, S2 Artist Files, S3 Johns Manville Papers, S4 Correspondence, S5 Miscellaneous, and S6 Research Files. All materials in series are arranged alphabetically by subject. 
The Biographical materials contain newspaper clippings featuring Labino, awards and honors earned by Labino, art exhibitions brochures which also featured Labino.  His artist files contain various information related to his career as an artist, including blueprints, notes, and sketches of some of his art projects.  This series also contains Labino’s technical notes and sketches which are somewhat difficult to decipher, if one is not familiar with chemicals involved in glass making but may offer insight into Labino’s methods and artistry.  The Johns Manville papers include documents from Labino’s career as director of research and development, including his research and correspondence for his work for the Atomic Energy Commission.  The Correspondence series consists of various general correspondences. The Miscellaneous series contains a variety of items such as various companies’ annual reports.  The Research Files series contains numerous journal clippings and magazine clippings arranged alphabetically by topic. 
The bulk of the collection is Dominick Labino’s Technical Library S7, which contains various volumes of scientific journals, magazines, and books mostly related to glass.  Labino fused his scientific knowledge of the chemistry and composition of glass to create unique glass art, therefore his technical library and research was very important to his career as an artist.
This collection also contains photographs, slides, and negatives in the seventh series.  The series has a few photographs of Labino in his workshop and many slides of various pieces created by Labino. 
The Artifacts included in this collection are a two hollow glass blocks, a small bag of glass fibers, a wooden Johns-Manville sign, a 3-ply laminate of 1.5/ ft chopped yarn mat, an unknown piece of black material, headphones, and an American flag.

Series List

S1

Biographical
1928-1993, 1/4 linear ft.
This series is arranged alphabetically according to subject.
Contains art exhibit brochures featuring pieces by Labino, articles from newspapers and magazines featuring Labino, other publications featuring Labino, awards and honors received by Labino, and various personal items.

S2

Artist Files
1893-1985, 1/4 linear ft.
This series is arranged alphabetically according to subject.
Contains various art exhibit brochures, related art subjects, newspaper clippings on various artists, various art projects by Labino including the University of Tampa Minaret, MCO Mace award, Riverside Hospital Lobby Mural, etc.

S3

Johns Manville Papers
1948-1973, 3/4 linear ft.
This series is arranged alphabetically by subject.
Contains various documents from Labino’s time at Johns Manville as Director of Research and Development.  These documents include Labino’s aero-space research, experimental glasses, experiment analyses and laboratory reports.  There is also financial information of the company in the Annual reports and meetings. This also contains two folders of Labino’s research and correspondence for the Atomic Energy Commission project.  The documents in these two folders are arranged chronologically.

S4

Correspondence
Date, 1/4 linear ft.
Arranged Alphabetically by person or company and documents are then arranged chronologically.
Contains correspondence with Doug Neckers, Crescent Glass Company, Lucas County Commissioner, and various general correspondences.

S5

Miscellaneous Files
1896-1984, 1/4 linear ft.
This series is arranged alphabetically by subject.
Contains various papers and information, including Labino’s papers from Bowling Green State University, financial information, Annual reports from Corning Glass Works, Jeanette Glass Company, L.O.F., Owens Corning and Owens Illinois.  This series also includes a Woodworkers Tools Catalogue from 1896 and a Starret Tools Catalogue from 1900.

S6

Research Files
1937-1983, ½ linear ft.
This series is arranged alphabetically by subject.
Contains articles from journals and magazines, also some notes arranged by various topics mainly related to art, glass, and science.

S7

Technical Library
1949-1986, 9 linear ft.
This series is arranged alphabetically and then chronologically.
Labino’s technical library includes scientific journals, magazines, pamphlets, books, and other publications mostly relating to glass.

S8

Photographs, Slides, and Negatives
1967-1981, 1/4 linear ft.
This series is arranged alphabetically by subject.
Included in this series are photographs of Dominic Labino in his workshop, artworks from the Toledo Museum of Art, and The Henry Ford Museum.  Also included in this series are numerous slides from Labino exhibits and of pieces of art by Labino.

S9

Artifacts
Unknown, 1 linear ft.
Glass Blocks, flag, Chopped Yarn Laminate, Glass Fibers, Wooden sign

Folder List

Box

Folder

Item

 

 

 

 

 

S1: Biographical

1

1

American Glass Now Exhibit

1

2

Art Exhibits featuring Labino:
1966 Organization for Rehabilitation through Training: 4th Annual Art Show and Auction
1966 Contemporary Blown Glass
1967 32nd Annual Show: The Massillon Museum
1968 Twentieth Wichita : National Invitational Decorative Arts and Ceramics
1969 How Glass is Made:  The Toledo Museum of Art, Museum News
1969 Modern Glass: The Toledo Museum of Art, Museum News
1969 Art in Glass: A Guide to Glass Collections, The Toledo Museum of Art
1970 Graphics/Glass from the Miller Gallery
1971-1972 Reflections on Glass
1980 Dominick Labino
1981 Emergence: Art in Glass, A National Invitational Exhibit (Bowling Green State University)
1984 Glass: Dominick Labino and A New Generation Wassenberg Art Center
Liturgical Arts Exhibit, n.d.
Toledo Area Artists 52nd Annual Exhibition: The Toledo Museum of Art, n.d.

4

2

Articles featuring Labino:
Newspapers:
“Cloister Lends Timeless Quality to Formal Dinner,” The Blade, April 30, 1969.
“Free-Form glass his Forte,” Journal Herald, February 18, 1970.
“‘Gold’ Glass Chalice is Unique in the U.S.,” Catholic Chronicle, January 31, 1969.
“Glass Artist Helps Put Town on the Map,” The Daily Sentinel-Tribune, Bowling Green, Ohio, July 7, 1983.
“Ambassador’s Wife Finds Washington Life Hectic,” The Blade, Oct. 5, 1971.
“Muesum of Art Exhibits Artists’ Works for Rent,” The Blade, Oct. 10, 1970.
Unknown Paper: Picture of D. Labino showing insulating material developed by Johns-Manville.
“Libbey Pleochroic Glass Wins Collector Approval,” Collectors Weekly, Nov. 17, 1970.
“Folksingers Open Craft Group’s Fall Agenda,” The Blade, Oct. 14, 1963.
Magazine:
“A New Glass House to House the Best of Beautiful Glass,” by Michael Olmert, Smithsonian

1

3

Auctions featuring Labino Glass

1

4

Awards and Honors (including 1981: Toledo Glass and Ceramic Award, 1977: Phoenix Award Program)

14

6

Newspaper Magazine featuring Labino

1

5

Personal Items: Carnegie Institute of Technology Schedule Cards, Pittsburgh Vocational Schools Honor Roll Certificates, Life Insurance, Plane Tickets to London, “Another Glass Blower for Peace” sticker, Allegheny Vocational School Report Cards

1

6

Publications featuring Labino (1969-1972):

“How Glass is Made” Museum News: Toledo Museum Art, vol. 15, no. 1.

Bruner, Louise. “Glass Workshop” American Artist. New York Metropolitan Edition. Feb. 1969, pg. 48.

“The Sandwich Glass Forum” National Antiques Review: the Monthly Guide to Antique Values, Nov. 1969, pg. 18.

LaRevue Moderne: des arts et de la vie. Nov. 1972, pg. 23. (French Publication)

Skillitizi, Stephen. “Glassblowing—A Ceramic Alternative” Pottery in Australia. vol. 11 no. 1 Autumn, 1972, pg. 36.

“American Glass Now” Exhibition Catalogue, pg. 35.

1

7

Publications featuring Labino (1973-1987):

Labino, Dominick. “Working with Hot Glass” Conference: Introduction to Lecture. Newsletter of Glass Art Society, 1976.

Crafts, 1976, pg. 24.

Zerwick, Choloe. A Short History of Glass. The Corning Museum of Glass, pg. 89.

The Museum Journal: A Touch of Glass. XXII, 1983.

Sasser, Elizabeth Skidmore, “New Glass in the United States”. New Glass Review 8: The Corning Museum of Glass, 1987, pg. 11.

 

 

 

 

 

S2: Artist Files

14

1

Additions to Sandwich Plant Blueprints (1964)

1

8

Art Exhibits and Brochures (Folder 1 of 2)

1

9

Art Exhibits and Brochures (Folder 2 of 2)

1

10

Art Sketches

4

1

Articles about Glass (various newspaper clippings)

1

11

Blueprints for Glass Furnaces

1

12

Ceramics: “Handbook for the Ceramic Decorator”

1

13

Columbian Coin Toothpick Holder (1893)

1

14

Corning Community College Seminar (1975)

1

15

Corning Community College Correspondence

1

16

Corning Museum of Glass

1

17

Corning Museum of Glass Annual Reports

1

18

Corning Museum of Glass Seminar (1971)

4

6

Factors of Raw Materials

1

19

G.A.S. Convention in Toledo (1975)

1

20

Glass Art Society in Corning (1976)

1

21

Glass Artists Conference at Corning Museum of Glass (1975)

1

22

Glass Blowing Demonstrations

1

23

Glass Conferences

1

24

International Glass Conference (1982)

1

25

Island Woodworks Display for Labino Sculpture

1

26

Louis Vaupel

1

27

M.C.O. MACE Award (1964): including photograph and award program

1

28

Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin

1

29

Newspaper Articles- Misc. Clippings

14

5

Newspaper Magazines about Glass

14

7

Riverside Hospital Lobby Blueprints and Correspondence

1

30

Saul R. Gilford

1

31

Science Lecture Building at B.G.S.U. (Blueprints and Sketches for Artwork)

1

32

Seigfred Seminar  Program (1966) Guest Lecturer: Labino

1

33

Society of Glass Decorators Annual Seminar (1976)

1

34

Steuben Glass

4

13

Technical Notes

4

14

Technical Notes Glass Composition and Colors

4

15

Technical Notes on Glass Properties

4

16

Technical Notes on Color

4

17

Technical Sketches

1

35

Toledo Museum of Art (Cultural Heritage Booklet, 1969 Calendar)

1

36

Tools of the Glass Industry

15

8

Top of Toledo Restaurant Blueprints and Correspondence

4

18

University of Tampa , Glass Minaret (1973)

1

37

“Working With Hot Glass” International Conference and Workshop (1976)

1

38

Workshops in Glass

 

 

 

 

 

S3: Johns-Manville Papers

1

39

Aero-Space Research

4

3

Atomic Energy Commission Papers (Folder 1 of 2)

4

4

Atomic Energy Commission Papers (Folder 2 of 2)

1

40

Experimental Glasses

4

5

F2Project

1

41

Glass Analysis Laboratory Report

1

42

Glass Figures and Tables (1967)

1

43

Harrop/Labino Glass Softening System

1

44

Johns-Manville Annual Meetings and Reports

1

45

Johns-Manville Miscellaneous papers

2

1

Johns-Manville Newsletters

2

2

Johns-Manville Products

2

3

Johns-Manville Research (including various notes, laboratory reports)

2

4

Johns-Manville Research on Battery Separators

4

8

L-125 Leached Glass (Laboratory analysis and reports)

4

9

Leached Glass Cloth (Laboratory analysis and reports)

2

5

Sodium Silicate Fiberizing (invention, letter and notes)

2

6

Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System

2

7

Technical Notes from Johns-Manville

 

 

 

 

 

S4: Correspondence

2

8

Correspondence with Crescent Glass Company

2

9

Correspondence with Doug Neckers (1981-1982)

2

10

Correspondence- general  (regarding raw materials, thank you notes, etc.)

2

11

Correspondence with Lucas County Commissioner

2

12

Correspondence with U.S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory

 

 

 

 

 

S5: Miscellaneous

2

13

Allegheny Ludlum Annual Report

2

14

Autoroll Printers (Screen printers)

14

2

Bewdly Will

2

15

B.G.S.U (1971-1973) general papers

2

16

Blueprint for General Assembly of Cast Iron Delivery Equipment (Glass Fibers Inc.)

2

17

Blueprint- No Label with Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete, drawn by Labino

2

18

Corning Glass Works Annual Reports and Product News

2

19

Crescent Glass Company Notes on materials and prices

2

20

Engelhard (Catalogues and Charts)

4

7

Financial Information

2

21

Findlay Refractory Catalogue

3

36

Glass City Classic Program

2

22

Industrial Research Newsletters

2

23

Jeanette Glass Company Annual Report (1969)

2

24

Korbel Champagne Glass (1977)

2

25

Libby Glass 150 Year Anniversary

2

26

L.O.F. Annual Reports

2

27

Miscellaneous Glass Information

2

28

National Spectrographic Laboratories (Analysis reports)

2

29

Nature (American West Publishing Company)

2

30

Owens Corning Annual Report (1971)

2

31

Owens-Illinois (outlook newsletters, advertisements, annual seminar)

2

32

Owens Technical College Glass Technology Major Pamphlet

2

33

Papermaking (workshop information)

2

34

Patents (Correspondence and documents regarding pending patents, and other info.)

2

35

Phosphate Glasses of the #340 Type (Laboratory report from L.O.F.)

2

36

Prices of Raw Materials

2

37

Shop Operation Sheets from “Machinery” (1907)

4

12

Space Exploration Articles

2

38

Starret Tools Catalogue (1900)

2

39

The Toledo Club Members (1984)

2

40

Virginia Electric and Power Company Annual Report

2

41

Water Control (examination report, various information)

2

42

Woodworkers Tools Catalogue (1896)

 

 

 

 

 

S6: Research Files

2

43

Research Articles - Misc. Topics

2

44

Ancient Glass

2

45

Atomic Arrangement in Glass

2

46

Ceramics ( Folder 1 of 2)

2

47

Ceramics (Folder 2 of 2)

2

48

Chemical Properties of Boric Oxide Glasses (Research paper with blueprint)

2

49

Chemical Shortages

2

50

Clay

2

51

Color in Glass

2

52

Equipment Maintenance

2

53

Fiberglas

2

54

Furnaces

2

55

Gas

3

1

Glass (Folder 1 of 2)

3

2

Glass (Folder 2 of 2)

3

3

Glass Blowing

3

4

Glass Containers

3

5

Electronics

3

6

Glass Fibers

3

7

Glass-Fiber Reinforced Plastics

3

8

Glass History

3

9

Glass Markets

3

10

Glass Laser Material

3

11

Glass in New England

3

12

Glass Technology

3

13

History of Glassmaking at Jamestown

3

14

Laboratories and Workplaces

3

15

Lithium Oxide Glass (Research Report)

3

16

Materials

3

17

Mechanization of the Glass Industry

3

18

Metals

3

19

Micro-Quartz Felt Fibers

3

20

Optical Glass

3

21

Paper

3

22

Photochromics (Folder 1of 2)

3

23

Physics of Glass

3

24

Pollution

3

25

Silicates

3

26

Space and NASA

3

27

Spodumene

3

28

Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete

3

29

Glass Surfaces

 

 

 

 

 

S7: Technical Library: Various Issues and Volumes of Scientific magazines, journals, pamphlets, and other publications

 

 

 

5

1

“Advanced Ceramic Materials”  (April 1968)

5

2

“Advanced Materials Technology (1965)

3

31

Advance Papers of an International Symposium on High Temperature Technology

5

3

“Alumina Properties” (1960)

5

4

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin” (1958)

5

5

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin” (1966)

5

6

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1967)

5

7

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1969)

5

8

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1970)

5

9

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1971: Jan-June)

5

10

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1971: July-Dec.)

5

11

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1978)

5

12

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1979)

5

13

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1980)

5

14

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1981)

5

15

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1983)

5

16

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1984)

5

17

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1985)

5

18

“American Ceramic Society Bulletin”  (1986)

5

19

“American Forests”  (1965)

5

20

“Annual Bulletin of the Paperweight Collectors’ Association” (1977)

5

21

“The Antique Bottle Collector”  (1963, 1964)

5

22

“Business Management” (1970: Aug.)

5

23

“American Scientist” (1965)

5

24

“Analyza” (1989)

5

25

“The Antiques Journal”  (1975)

5

26

“Archaeology”  (1969, 1970)

5

27

“Ceramic Age”  (1963)

5

28

“Ceramic Age” (1964)

5

29

“Ceramic Age” (1968)

13

14

“Ceramics for Advanced Technologies” (1965)

13

15

“Ceramic Glazes”

6

1

“The Ceramic Industry” (1949: Jan-June)

6

2

“The Ceramic Industry” (1949: July –Dec.)

6

3

“The Ceramic Industry” (1950: Jan-June)

6

4

“The Ceramic Industry” (1950: July-Dec.)

6

5

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1951: Jan.-June)

6

6

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1951: July –Dec.)

6

7

“The Ceramic Industry” (1952)

6

8

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1953)

6

9

“The Ceramic Industry” (1954)

6

10

“The Ceramic Industry” (1955)

6

11

“The Ceramic Industry” (1956)

6

12

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1959)

6

13

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1964)

6

14

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1968)

6

15

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1969)

6

16

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1972)

6

17

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1975)

6

18

“The Ceramic Industry” (1976)

7

1

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1980)

7

2

“The Ceramic Industry”  (1981)

7

3

“The Ceramic Industry” (1983)

7

4

“The Ceramic Industry” (1984)

7

5

“The Ceramic Industry” (1985)

7

6

“The Ceramic Industry” (1986)

7

7

“The Ceramic Industry” (1998)

13

16

“Ceramic Industry” Misc. Articles

7

8

“Ceramics Monthly”  (1973)

7

9

“Chemical Engineering”  (1966)

7

10

“Chemical Engineering” (1969)

7

11

“Chemical Engineering”  (1970: April-July)

7

12

“Chemical Engineering” (1970: Aug.- Oct.)

7

13

“Chemical Engineering” (1971)

7

14

“Chemical Engineering” (1972)

7

15

“The Chemical Performance of Glass Containers”

7

16

“Chemtech” (1971)

7

17

“The Chronicle of the Early American Industries”

3

32

“Colonial Williamsburg Archeological Series, vol. 3”

7

18

“Conditions of Glass Formation Among Simple Compounds”

13

17

“Contact of Hot Glass with Metal” Symposium(1964)

7

19

“Corning Research” (1969)

7

20

“Corning Research” (1971)

7

21

“Corning Research” (1972)

7

22

“Corning Research” (1973)

7

23

“Corning Research” (1974))

3

 

“Cubist Prints” from the Collection of Dr. and Mrs Abraham Melamed (1972)

7

24

“Design Quarterly” #74

7

25

“The Eitel Institute for Silicate Research Symposium Proceedings”

13

18

“Electronic Ceramics” (1964)

3

35

“Enameling” Research Paper

7

26

Engelhard Industries, Inc. Technical Bulletins (1960-1962)

7

27

Engelhard Industries, Inc. Technical Bulletins (1963-1965)

3

40

“Engineering with Glass” Corning Booklet based on film, n.d.

8

1

“Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology”

8

2

“European Scientific Notes” from Office of Naval Research, London

8

3

“Flat Glass Manufacturing Processes”

8

4

“Foote Prints”

8

5

“From Sand-Core Automation: a history of glass containers”

8

6

“Glass Containers” (1958-1963)

8

7

“Glass Containers” (1964-1970)

8

8

“Glass in Colonial Williamsburg” Archeology Series

8

9

“Glass in Science and Industry”

8

10

 “Glass Industry” (1950 and Later)

8

11

“Glass Industry” –Various dates

8

12

“Glass Technology” (1960)

8

13

“Glass Technology” (1961: No. 1-3)

8

14

“Glass Technology” (1961: No. 4-6)

8

15

“Glass Technology” (1962: No. 1-3)

8

16

“Glass Technology” (1963: No. 4-6)

8

17

“Glass Technology” (1963: No. 1-3)

8

18

“Glass Technology” (1963, No. 4-6)

8

19

“Glass Technology” (1964: No. 1-3)

8

20

“Glass Technology” (1964: No. 4-6)

8

21

“Glass Technology” (1965: No. 1-3)

8

22

“Glass Technology” (1965: No. 4-6)

9

1

“Glass Technology” (1966: No. 1-3)

9

2

“Glass Technology” (1966: No. 4-6 )

9

3

“Glass Technology” (1967: No. 1-3)

9

4

“Glass Technology” (1967: No. 4-6)

9

5

“Glass Technology” (1968: No. 1-3)

9

6

“Glass Technology” (1968: No. 4-6)

9

7

“Glass Technology” (1969: No. 1-3)

9

8

“Glass Technology” (1969: No. 4-6)

9

9

“Glass Technology” (1975: No. 5)

13

19

“Glass Technology II” Lecture Notes (1948-1949)

9

10

“The Glass Workshop: Journal of Stained Glass and Allied Arts”

9

11

“Glossary of Terms Used in The Glass Industry”

9

12

“The Herald” –Various Dates

9

13

“High Technology” (June 1983)

9

14

“Hollow and Specialty Glass: Background and Challenge”

9

15

“Industrial Gas”

9

16

“Instruments and Control Systems” (1968)

9

17

“Instruments and Control Systems” (1969)

9

18

“Instruments and Control Systems” (1970)

9

19

“Instruments and Control Systems” (1971)

9

20

“Instruments and Control Systems” (1972)

9

21

“Instruments and Control Systems” (1974)

10

1

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1963)

10

2

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1966)

10

3

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1970)

10

4

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1971)

10

5

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1972)

10

6

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1976)

10

7

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1978)

10

8

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1979)

10

9

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1980)

10

10

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1981)

10

11

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1982)

10

12

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1983)

10

13

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society” (1985)

10

14

“Journal of the American Ceramic Society”  (1986)

13

20

“The Journal of British Ceramic Society” (1966)

10

15

“Journal of the Society of Glass Technology”  (1947)

3

37

“Keramic Kilns” (1946)

3

38

“Lectures on Glass Science and Technology” (1966)

4

11

“Life” (1969) featuring Space Exploration

13

21

“Low Solubility Glazes” (1951)

3

33

“Manufacture and Design of Commercial Glassware,” Corning Glass Works, n.d.

10

16

“Materials Engineering” (1968)

10

17

“Materials Engineering” (1969)

10

18

“Materials Engineering” (1970)

10

19

“Materials Engineering” (1971)

11

1

“Modern Commercial Glasses”

11

2

“Museum News” Toledo Museum of Art

11

3

“Modern Plastics” Various Dates

11

4

“National Aeronautic and  Space Administration” Pamphlet

11

5

“National Bureau of Standards Technical Note”

13

22

“Nonmetallic Materials”  National Academy of Sciences (1969)

11

6

“Northwest Ohio Quarterly”

11

7

“Ordnance”

11

8

“Paper Trade Journal” (1964 & 1965)

11

9

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1960)

11

10

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1961)

11

11

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses”  (1962)

11

12

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1963)

11

13

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1964)

11

14

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1965)

11

15

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1966)

11

16

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1967)

11

17

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1968)

11

18

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1969)

11

19

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1970)

12

1

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1971)

12

2

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1972)

12

3

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1973)

12

4

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1974)

12

5

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1975)

12

6

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1976)

12

7

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1977)

12

8

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1978)

12

9

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1979)

12

10

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1980)

12

11

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1981)

12

12

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1982)

12

13

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1983)

12

14

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses” (1984)

12

15

“Physics and Chemistry of Glasses”  (1985)

3

39

“Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods” vol. II, part B. (1965)

12

16

“Plutonium” U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (1964)

12

17

“The Power Specialist” (1961)

13

23

“Properties of Glasses at Elevated Temperatures”

12

18

“Properties of Glasses at Elevated Temperatures” Technical Report (1965)

13

1

“Research Development” (1964)

13

2

“Sand and Imagination”

13

3

“Scientific American” (1969)

13

24

“Selenium Tellurium Cobalt and Nickel in Glass Making” (1956)

13

4

Society of Glass Decorators 12th Annual Seminar (1975)

13

5

Society of Glass Technology: List of Members, Rules and Regulations

13

25

“Specifications of Glass Containers for Pharmaceutical Use” (1970)

13

6

“Stained Glass Primer”

13

26

“The Story of Handmade Glass”

13

27

“Surface Properties of Silicate Glasses”

13

7

“Techne” (1969)

13

28

“Technology of New Devitrified Ceramics” (1964)

13

8

“Textile World” (1961, 1962)

13

29

“Thermal Properties of Ceramics” (1958)

13

9

Toledo Museum of Art Publications:
“American Glass”
“Ancient and Near Eastern Glass”
“Early American Pressed Glass”
“European Glass”
“Greek Vases”
“Libbey Glass: a Tradition of 150 years”
“New England Glass Company”
“The Museum Collects: Treasures by Sculptors and Craftsmen”

13

10

“Toledo Technical Topics” Various Dates

13

30

“A Tryal of Glasse: The Story of Glass Making at Jamestown”

13

11

“Vitreous Enamels”

13

12

Williamsburg Craft Series:
“The Cabinetmaker in Eighteenth-Century Williamsburg”
“The Blacksmith in Eighteenth-Century Williamsburg”

13

13

“The Wonderful World of Ohio”

 

 

 

 

 

S8: Photographs, Slides, and Negatives

 

 

 

 

 

Photographs

14

3

Dominic Labino

14

4

Grand Rapids High School Pirates (1967)

3

30

Photographs: Dominic Labino in his workshop and the Glass Workshop at The Henry Ford Museum

3

41

Toledo Museum of Art Photographs

 

 

 

 

 

Slides

13

32

Batchroom Chemicals

13

33

Blown Glass and Sculpture (1969)

13

34

Contemporary Blown Glass- Various Artists

13

35

Dichroic (1980)

13

36

Dominic Labino

13

37

First Award-Toledo Exhibit (Paperweight Technique) (1969)

13

38

Flint Museum of Art (1968)

13

39

Glass (1967)

13

40

Glass (1980)

13

41

Labeled Pieces by Labino

13

42

Labino Pieces- Not Labeled

13

43

Milwaukee Public Museum “Giants of American Art Glass” (Summer 1981)

13

44

Motors and Equipment

13

45

Neville Exhibit

13

46

Outdoor Shots of Labino Pieces (1974)

13

47

Panels and Sculptures by Labino

13

48

Pilkington Brochure

13

49

Presentation (not completed)

13

50

Riverside Hospital Lobby (1974)

13

51

Schuler Riefstahl- Toledo Museum of Art (1964)

13

52

Unknown- Not Labeled

 

 

 

 

 

Negatives

13

31

Negatives of Labino Pieces

 

 

 

 

 

S9: Artifacts

15

 

Bag of glass fibers, Fiberfax, Johns-Manville Fiberglas wooden sign, 3-ply Laminate of 1.5/ Ft Chopped Yarn Mat, Unknown piece of black material

16

 

Headphones

17

 

Glass Block

18

 

Glass Block

19

 

American Flag

 

Last Updated: 1/3/12