Canaday Center

Events and Announcements

The Ward M. Canaday Center has extended the current exhibition to
September 30, 2014

Letters of Luminaries: Notable Correspondence in the
Collections of the Ward M. Canaday Center: An Exhibition


 

THE WARD M. CANADAY CENTER FOR SPECIAL COLLECTIONS,
THE UNIVERSITY OF TOLEDO LIBRARIES
 
Invites you to a lecture and book signing by
National Book Critics Circle Award Winner
 
 James TobinThe Man He Became: How FDR Defied Polio to Win the Presidency
James Tobin

Author of The Man He Became:
How FDR Defied Polio to Win the Presidency

Wednesday, April 2, 3 p.m.

Ward M. Canaday Center, 5th Floor
William S. Carlson Library, The University of Toledo
Parking available in Lot 13 and the West Parking Ramp
 
For more information, contact
the Canaday Center at 419.530.4480

  Canaday Center exhibition features correspondence of luminaries

Letters of Luminaries: Notable Correspondence in the
Collections of the Ward M. Canaday Center: An Exhibition

“Letters and documents are the most direct link we have to the heroes and heroines, villains, and ordinary people of the past. They show these men Letters of Luminaries poster imageand women as human beings, dealing with matters on a scale that all of us can relate. We begin to appreciate that their lives may not be all that different from our own—that people of the past confronted the same feelings and fears that we all do, and that they persevered to achieve the goals—both great and small—of their lives.”

Kenneth W. Rendell, History Comes to Life: Collecting Historical Letters and Documents

The staff of the Canaday Center spent the past year culling though its 6000 feet of manuscript collections to locate letters signed by important persons. They located letters from political leaders, business leaders, intellectuals, celebrities, sports figures, authors, foreign dignitaries, and famous Toledoans.

Also on display: “Celebrity Sightings,” an exhibit of signed photographs and memorabilia from movie stars, political leaders, and musical performers

In addition the “Letters of Luminaries,” the Canaday Center has also organized a smaller exhibit on the fifth floor of Carlson Library adjacent to the Center titled “Celebrity Sightings.” It features enlargements of signed photographs of famous people from the Canaday Center’s holdings, including photographs of Orson Wells, Katherine Hepburn, H.G. Wells, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Of note is an enlargement of a photograph taken in Toledo on September 22, 1967, of Martin Luther King, Jr. that was signed by King and given to then-UT President William S. Carlson. The only appearance by King in Toledo, he spoke that day at a rally at Scott High School. The photograph was taken at a reception after the speech.

Also included in this exhibit are copies of pages from scrapbooks maintained by the UT Office of Special Events from 1976 to the early 1990s that document concerts performed in Centennial (now Savage) Hall. These scrapbook pages include signatures and sentiments from Bob Dylan, Cher, Steve Martin, and Bill Cosby, among others.

            Both exhibits are free and open to the public. They are on display Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., through July 31, 2014. Special and group showings can be arranged by called 419-530-4480.


 

Medicine on the Maumee:  A History of Health Care in Northwest Ohio

Speakers’ Series

 All events held in the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections, Fifth Floor, William S. Carlson Library

 

September 26, 3 p.m.:  “The History of Hospital-Based Nurse Education in 20th Century Toledo,” by Joanna Russ, archivist, ProMedica.

October 3, 3 p.m.:  “The History of HIV Infection in Northwest Ohio,” a panel discussion led by Dr. Joan Duggan, director of the Toledo Ryan White HIV Center.

October 10, 3 p.m.:  “A Man, His Work, and His Legacy—Conrad Jobst,” by Dr. Anthony Comerota, director of the Jobst Vascular Institute at ProMedica Toledo Hospital.

October 17, 3 p.m.:  “Posing for Eternity: The Art and Science of Plastination,” by Dr. Carlos Baptista, president of the International Society for Plastination.

October 24, 3:30 p.m.:  “From M*A*S*H to the Great Black Swamp: The Life of John Howard M.D.,” by Dr. S. Amjad Hussain, UT professor emeritus.

November 7, 3 p.m.:  “The Magician with a Meningioma,” by Dr. James Ravin, Toledo ophthalmologist and medical historian.

 

All Events Free and Open to the Public

Reception to Follow Each Talk


New Exhibit: Medicine on the Maumee

February 23rd, 2012

The faculty and staff of the Ward M. Canaday Center are pleased to present a new exhibit. Medicine on the Maumee: A History of Health Care in Northwest Ohio, opens on Thursday, March 1, 2012.  The exhibit will explore the history of medicine in the local area from the time of its settlement to the present day.  A variety of institutions have contributed artifacts to the exhibit, which features rare books, first-hand accounts, and other fascinating objects.

The exhibit opening will be held in the Center at 3 p.m. on March 1st and will feature John Jaeger recreating his great-grandfather Dr. Frederick Jaeger as “The Black Swamp Doctor.’  Dr. Jaeger’s patient logbooks are included in the exhibit.  The opening is free and open to the public, with a reception to follow.

The exhibit will remain through December 2012, and is open Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.  Group tours may be arranged.  Call the Canaday Center at 419-530-4480 for more information.

Exhibition Website: http://libraryexhibits.utad.utoledo.edu/MEDX/index.html


The 5th floor of Carlson Library will re-open on Monday, August 22, as a quiet study area after being closed for the summer for renovations. Some work continues on the floor, which may be disruptive. Some collections of the Ward M. Canaday Center may continue to be inaccessible. Patrons wishing to use Canaday Center materials are advised to request these in advance to allow staff time to locate the materials.

University Archives remains unable to accept transfers of university records from campus offices until further notice.

August 19, 2011


Effective 6/6/2011 and until further notice, the fifth floor of Carlson Library is closed to patrons due to renovation work. The Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections is open to researchers by appointment only. Because collections may be inaccessible during this time, telephone and email reference assistance may also not be possible.

Visitors wishing to view the exhibit "Wholly Toledo: The Business and Industry that Shaped the City" should call 419-530-4480 to arrange access.

At this time, University Archives is unable to accept the transfer of any records from university offices. Please call the university archivist at 419-530-2170 to schedule a future date for record transfers.

We apologize for the inconvenience.

June 3, 2011


In conjunction with the current exhibition "Wholly Toledo:
The Business and Industry that Shaped the City"

Toledo Business History Speaker Series

March 16, 3 p.m.: Jack Paquette will talk about the early history of Owens-Illinois and will sign copies of his books;

March 23, 3 p.m.:
Charles Hartlage will talk about the history of the Dana Corporation;

March 30, 3 p.m.:
Robert Terry will talk about the history of Toledo Scale and will sign copies of his book;

April 6, 3 p.m.:
Bill Hamilton will talk about the history of Owens Corning;

April 13, 3 p.m.:
Marjorie Waterfield will talk about the history of the DeVilbiss Corporation.

All lectures will take place in the

Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections
5th floor, William S. Carlson Library
The University of Toledo
Free and open to the public

For more information, contact the
Ward M. Canaday Center at 419-530-4480.

March 2, 2011


Toledo's economic history detailed in exhibit

The city of Toledo was built by glass. And auto parts, Jeeps, scales and more.

Georges LaChance painting

This gold Toledo Scale from around 1929 is seen in Georges LaChance's painting titled "O.N. Teall — Final Inspection." Both are part of the "Wholly Toledo" exhibit; the painting belongs to the Canaday Center, and the scale is on loan from the Maumee Valley Historical Society.

Check out "Wholly Toledo: The Business and Industry That Shaped the City." The exhibition will open Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 2 p.m. in the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections in Carlson Library.

"We have been collecting records of Toledo businesses for many years," said Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center and university archivist. "We preserve the historical records of the three largest glass companies: Libbey-Owens-Ford, Owens-Illinois and Owens Corning. We have the records of Toledo Scale and The Andersons, too, among many others, so it seemed like we should do an exhibit that looks at the economic history of the city overall, showcasing some of the companies that had a huge impact on the city."

This 1940 photo of Willys-Overland Jeep test vehicle

This 1940 photo in the exhibit shows the Willys-Overland Jeep test vehicle being driven up the steps of a building in Washington, D.C., to show off its versatility. The company produced 1,500 models for the government in 75 days to help the war effort.

Highlights of the exhibit include:

• "Future Great City of the World," a pamphlet from 1868 by Jesup W. Scott, Toledo real estate developer and newspaper editor, who founded the Toledo University of Arts and Trades, which later became The University of Toledo;

• Libbey Glass Co.'s doll and men's ties made from spun glass, the precursor to fiberglass, that were displayed at the 1892 World's Columbian Exposition;

• A signed copy of a book on die-casting written by Herman Doehler, who invented the die-casting process and in 1907 started Doehler Die-Casting (later Doehler-Jarvis), which was the first major manufacturer of vehicle hood ornaments, several of which are display;

• A catalog from the 1912 inaugural exhibit at the Toledo Museum of Art, which is still free today thanks to glass pioneer and founder Edward Drummond Libbey;

• Two watercolor paintings by James M. Sessions for the "Jeep at War" advertising series, which promoted the vehicle's versatility;

• A scale weighing more than 200 pounds from Toledo Scale and a series of paintings by Georges LaChance from 1928 to 1930 that pay tribute to the company's workers; and

• "M*A*S*H" scripts from Toledo native Jamie Farr, whose character Maxwell Klinger mentioned Tony Packo's during several episodes and helped the local restaurant become a national brand.

The exhibit also features a case dedicated to alternative energy.

"We actually discovered Libbey-Owens-Ford was one of the first companies to really tout solar energy, especially in housing. They developed the Thermopane window that turned windows from sources of heat loss into sources of energy," Floyd said. "Owens-Illinois also did some development of solar collector tubes."

UT's world-renowned research in photovoltaics and thin-film solar panels also is noted.

Leslie

Leslie

"While alternative energy is a bright spot for the city in the 21st century, since the late 19th century, Toledo has gone from a manufacturing economy to a service economy, from a period of growth to one of steady decline, from large to somewhat smaller, from union to non-union, from local ownership of its major businesses to outside investor control," Floyd said. "But if we look at our city today, we see important marks left by the great industrial and commercial leaders that continue to make for a good quality of life in spite of these trends."

Some of those marks will be discussed by Dr. Stuart W. Leslie, professor of the history of science and technology at Johns Hopkins University, at the exhibit opening. His talk is titled "Heart of Glass: The Architectural Legacy of Toledo's Signature Industry."

"The talk looks at five buildings that have defined the Toledo skyline — the Libbey-Owens-Ford Building, Fiberglas Tower, Owens-Illinois' One Seagate Center, the Owens Corning world headquarters and the Toledo Museum of Art's Glass Pavilion," he said. "These buildings said, in steel, glass and fiberglass, this is who we are; this is what we do; this is how we do it. They are a revealing corporate and civic memoir of Toledo."

The exhibit will be introduced by a short documentary, "Wholly Toledo," which was created by Ashley Bouknight, a recent University of South Carolina graduate, who interned at the Canaday Center over the summer.

"I think there's something to be learned on how we move into the future by knowing where we came from the past. For example, I think you can see the connections between the glass industry and the solar industry," Floyd said. "A lot of young people today probably don't realize how many industries were in Toledo and how important the city was to the country. This is an opportunity to remind everyone."

"Wholly Toledo: The Business and Industry That Shaped the City" will be on display in the Canaday Center through Friday, Aug. 12. Viewing hours are Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The program is made possible in part through the support of the Ohio Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

For more information on the free, public exhibition, call 419.530.4480.

By Vicki Kroll, November 10, 2010

Exhibition opening: Wholly Toledo

You are invited to the opening of the exhibition
"Wholly Toledo: The Business and Industry that Shaped the City"Wednesday, November 17, 2010, 4 p.m.Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections
Fifth floor, William S. Carlson Library, The University of Toledo
Opening lecture by Stuart W. Leslie
Professor of the History of Science and Technology
Johns Hopkins University

Reception immediately following

Please respond by November 10, 2010
419-530-2200
Or
Specialevents@utoledo.edu
Parking available in Lot 13 and West Parking Ramp

Program made possible in part through the support of
The Ohio Humanities Council,A state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities

November 5, 2010


Noted novelist shares lifetime of revelations

Author and UT alumnus Craig Holden looks through recently donated his papers

The University extended sanctuary to some shady characters — Jazz Age bootleggers, sexual obsessives and high-rolling grifters among them — when acclaimed writer Craig Holden donated his personal papers to the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections in Carlson Library.

Holden, who grew up in Toledo and took his UT bachelor's degree in psychology, biology and philosophy in 1983, is the author of faced-paced novels that include The River Sorrow (1993), Four Corners of Night (1999), The Jazz Bird (2001), The Narcissist's Daughter (2004) and Matala (2007).

Holden's papers provide a remarkably complete look at his development as a writer, according to Barbara Floyd, director of the Canaday Center. "The collection includes everything from early writing from his days as a student at Rogers High School in Toledo, through his undergraduate years at UT, and from his time in graduate studies in creative writing at the University of Montana at Missoula," she said. "The collection also includes multiple drafts of his novels, which document how his creative processes work."

Floyd first asked about the papers some years ago when Holden was teaching writing classes at UT, said the author, who's now on the English faculty at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. The process of moving from Michigan to New Mexico proved to be the impetus for the transfer, he explained from his new home: "I cleaned everything out that was stored in a loft over the garage, and in my office. My mom had boxes of stuff as well. I wasn't going to move it all down here, so I talked to Barbara again and the bulk of it went down to UT last summer."

Holden admitted that the career-spanning contents had gotten away from him: "I wasn't in a place in my life where I could sit down and organize everything, but Barbara said they would, which is wonderful. To have it all in one place appealed to me. When I took more things down this summer, I had a look at what they had organized and filed."

The collection should prove interesting to UT students seeking their own careers as authors, Floyd noted. "To see how someone takes a plot idea and develops it through draft after draft is fascinating," she said. "This collection allows a researcher to get into the mind of the creator in a way that is rarely possible."

For Holden, now deeply into the process of creating his next novel — a multi-generation family saga set partly in Europe and partly in the Michigan he knows so well — being part of a historical record is a new sensation.

"Yeah, it's a strange thing — I'm archived," he said, then laughed. "In a way it's weird, but it makes me happy to think about the records sitting in a nice temperature-controlled placed where they're not going to get lost.

"I don't have to worry about them anymore and I can visit whenever I want."

July 29, 2010


Ward M. Canaday Center acquires historical records of Dana Holding Corp.Bicycle fitted with a three-speed Dana transmission circa 1970.

The University of Toledo's Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections recently added approximately 180 linear feet of records documenting the history of the Dana Holding Corp. to its holdings.

The collection joins those of other major Toledo corporations preserved in the Canaday Center, which keeps the records of Libbey-Owens-Ford, Owens-Illinois Inc., Owens-Corning and Toledo Scale, according to Barbara Floyd, director of the center.

"This is a wonderful addition to our collections documenting Toledo business and industry. The collection should prove valuable to researchers interested not only in Toledo's history, but the history of the automobile industry nationally and internationally," Floyd said.

The Dana collection documents the company from its founding in 1904 by Clarence Spicer to recent years. The materials were previously stored at a facility in Virginia, but Dana decided recently to relocate them to the local area where the company has been headquartered since 1929. "It is wonderful that our community's history is back in Toledo," Floyd added.

The collection includes administrative materials, company publications, advertising and sales materials, public relations files, photographs and a few artifacts. Of particular interest is the original patent for Spicer's universal joint from 1903 that was the basis for the company's founding.

Prior to Spicer's development of the universal joint, automobiles transmitted engine power to the wheels through two sprockets connected by a chain. The system was loud and unreliable, and frequently broke down because it was difficult to lubricate. Spicer, who was attending engineering school at Cornell University at the time, developed a system that employed a universal joint at each end of a tubular shaft. The joints were encased in a housing to retain lubrication and shield it from road debris.

While the universal joint has existed since the 1500s, Spicer's improvements were immediately recognized by the fledging automotive industry as important to improving sales of their products. Many contacted Spicer seeking permission to manufacture the system, but Spicer decided to open his own plant in Plainfield, N.J. Soon manufacturers began to redesign their autos to accommodate Spicer's ever-improving designs.

During his life, Spicer was issued 27 U.S. patents and five French patents.

But for Spicer, the success of his products meant difficulties in keeping up with demand. He needed to expand, but lacked the capital to do so. In 1913, Charles Dana, a prosecuting attorney from New York who was the grandson of the man who founded the New York Sun newspaper, lent the company $15,000. Within two years, Dana owned nearly half the company and became president.

By1929, three automobile manufacturers were dominating the American car market — Ford, Chrysler and General Motors, all of them located in Detroit. To be closer to its main markets, Dana moved that year from New Jersey to a new complex on Bennett Road in Toledo. While the Depression dampened demand, the outbreak of World War II led to the need for military vehicles. Most importantly, Spicer Manufacturing produced the transfer cases, universal joints, propeller shafts, and front and rear axles for Willys-Overland's General Purpose, or Jeep, war vehicle.

Barbara Floyd showed off a bicycle fitted with a three-speed Dana transmission circa 1970. The bike is among the Dana Holding Corp. items now housed in the Canaday Center for Special Collections.

Atthe end of the war, the company changed its name in recognition of the person who served as president for 32 years, Charles Dana.

The company continued to expand and diversify. Between 1966 and 1979, Dana's sales grew from $450 million to more than $3 billion annually. In the 1970s, the company became known for its innovation and unique leadership style under president Rene McPherson. It was under McPherson that the company's corporate headquarters moved out to Dorr Street across from the Inverness Country Club.

Inthe past 10 years, the downturn in the North American automobile industry has clearly impacted the company. In March 2006, Dana's U.S. operations filed for Chapter 11 reorganization. Dana successfully emerged from Chapter 11 in February 2008 with a new board of directors, a new chairman, and a renewed focus on returning the company to a leadership position in the global vehicular supply industry.

Last year, Dana sold its headquarters building on Dorr Street to another Toledo-based company and relocated its corporate staff to its technical center in Maumee.

Because of the company's recent changes, Floyd said it was even more important to preserve its history. "When companies undergo major transitions, many fail to see the importance of their history and just discard their historical materials as irrelevant. We are pleased that Dana has recognized how important the company has been to our community and has chosen instead to preserve its history."

When the collection is eventually organized, it will be made available to researchers in the Canaday Center.

March 8, 2010


2010 University Authors and Artists Exhibition

The Ward M. Canaday Center is pleased to announce the 2010 University of Toledo Authors and Artists Exhibit at the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections on the fifth floor of Carlson Library from March 29 to April 30. Faculty with works in the exhibit will be honored at a reception to mark its opening on Monday, March 29, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.

University Authors Solicitation Form

December 16, 2009

Arjun Sabharwal, Digital Initiatives Librarian


Knowledgestream presentation: "From Institutions to Independendence"

The Knowledgestream presentation on disability history is brought to you by WGTE Public Media. More on Knowledgestream here.

June 12, 2009.

Arjun Sabharwal, Digital Initiatives Librarian

Medicine on the Maumee:  A History of Health Care in Northwest Ohio

Speakers’ Series

 

All events held in the Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections

Fifth Floor, William S. Carlson Library

 

September 26, 3 p.m.:  “The History of Hospital-Based Nurse Education in 20th Century Toledo,” by Joanna Russ, archivist, ProMedica.

 

October 3, 3 p.m.:  “The History of HIV Infection in Northwest Ohio,” a panel discussion led by Dr. Joan Duggan, director of the Toledo Ryan White HIV Center.

 

October 10, 3 p.m.:  “A Man, His Work, and His Legacy—Conrad Jobst,” by Dr. Anthony Comerota, director of the Jobst Vascular Institute at ProMedica Toledo Hospital.

 

October 17, 3 p.m.:  “Posing for Eternity: The Art and Science of Plastination,” by Dr. Carlos Baptista, president of the International Society for Plastination.

 

October 24, 3:30 p.m.:  “From M*A*S*H to the Great Black Swamp: The Life of John Howard M.D.,” by Dr. S. Amjad Hussain, UT professor emeritus.

 

November 7, 3 p.m.:  “The Magician with a Meningioma,” by Dr. James Ravin, Toledo ophthalmologist and medical historian.

 

All Events Free and Open to the Public

Reception to Follow Each Talk

Last Updated: 4/10/15