Department of Economics

Tutoring Hours and Current Course Offerings

Economics Tutoring Hours and Locations (University Hall, 4th Floor) for Spring 2015: 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

 

11:00 – 1:00

Mr. Yasin

UH 4110J

 

10:00 – 11:00

Mr. Corsi

UH 4110M

 

11:00 – 1:00

Mr. Yasin

UH 4110J

 

1:00 – 2:00

Mr. Prachanukul

UH 4110M

 

1:00 – 2:00

Mr. Corsi

UH 4110M

 

11:00 – 2:00

Mr. Prachanukul

UH 4110M

 

12:00 – 2:00

Mr. Corsi

UH 4110M

 

1:00 – 4:00

Mr. Orta

UH 4110J

 

2:00 – 4:00

Mr. Etnier

UH 4110M

 

1:00 – 3:00

Mr. Conley

UH 4110L

 

4:30 – 6:30

Mr. Conley

UH 4110L

 

5:30 – 7:00

Mr. Blazsik

UH 4110L

 

3:30 – 5:30

Ms. Bloom

UH 4110J

 

2:00 – 4:30

Ms. Bloom

UH 4110J

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3:30 – 4:30

Mr. Etnier

UH 4110M

 

 

 

 

 

 

5:30 – 7:00

Mr. Blazsik

UH 4110L

 

 

 

Fall 2014 Economics Courses: Current upper-level economics courses:

  • ECON 2810 (Introduction to Econometrics, 3 cr. hrs.) MW 2:00-3:15 PM. Prerequisites: MATH 2630. Included is the study of hypothesis testing, single and multiple regression, correlation analysis, time series and index numbers, and non-parametric statistics. [Professor Kristen Keith]
  • ECON 3080 (Economics of Crime, 3 cr. hrs.) TR 5:45-7:00 PM.
  • Prerequisites: ECON 1150, or 1200, or consent of the instructor. Study of crime as an economic activity; costs of crime to the community; economic approach to crime reduction. [Professor Larry Cook]
  • ECON 3200 (Intermediate Microeconomic Theory, 3 cr. hrs.) TR 12:30-1:45 PM.
  • Prerequisites: ECON 1200. Consumer Theory, utility and indifference curve analysis, theory of the firm, industry pricing in perfect and imperfect competition and distribution theory. [Professor Larry Cook]
  • ECON 3300 (Benefit-cost Analysis, 3 cr. hrs.) MW 9:30-10:45 AM. Prerequisites: ECON 1150, or 1200, or 3240, or consent of the instructor. The study of the evaluation of competing public policy alternatives and projects to more efficiently allocate society’s resources. Applications include transportation, public health, criminal justice, education, and the environment.. [Professor Kevin Egan]
  • ECON 4300/5300 (Math Economics, 3 cr. hrs.) TR 9:30-10:45 AM.
  • Prerequisites: ECON 1150, or 1200, or consent of instructor. Development and applications of the mathematical tools used by economists. Differential and integral calculus, linear algebra, transcendental functions and series. [Professor Gene Chang]
  • ECON 4810/5810 (Econometrics I, 3 cr. hrs.) TR 2:00-3:15 PM.
  • Prerequisites: ECON 1150, 1200, and MATH 2630; or ECON 2810. An introduction to econometric methods and their use in quantitative analysis of economic theories. Diagnostics for problems typically encountered are detailed along with techniques for correcting these problems. [Professor Sasha Amialchuk]
  • For the complete list of economics courses please visit the registrar's website: http://www.utoledo.edu/offices/registrar/sch_classes.html

 Spring 2015 Economics Courses: Please take note of the following upper-level economics courses scheduled to be offered in the Spring of 2015:

  • ECON 3150 (Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory, 3 cr. hrs.) MW 12:30-1:45 PM. Prerequisites: ECON 1150. National income accounting; theory of income determination; causal relationships; analysis of consumption, investment, government and foreign demand functions; integration of theories of income, output, money and interest. [Professor David Black]
  • ECON 3270 (Natural Resource Economics, 3 cr. hrs.) M 5:45-8:15 PM. Prerequisites: ECON 1150 or ECON 1200 or consent of instructor. Economic analysis of natural resource conservation and use, considering the objectives of efficiency and sustainability. Topics include energy, minerals, marine resources, land and agriculture, outdoor recreation, biodiversity and wildlife management. [Professor Kevin Egan]
  • ECON 3810 (Applied Econometrics, 3 cr. hrs.) TR 9:30-10:45 AM. Prerequisites: ECON 2810, or consent of instructor. Topics emphasize applications of a wide range of statistical apporaches to time-series, cross-sectional, panel, and other types of data. Included are micro-econometric topics such as panel data models, qualitative choice models, hazard models, and others. The time-series macro-econometric topics include model stationarity, cointegration, error correction mechanisms, ARCH and GARCH mdoels, economic forecasting, and others. [Professor Kristen Keith]
  • ECON 4130/5130 (Monetary & Fiscal Policy, 3 cr. hrs.) MW 9:30-10:45 AM. Prerequisites: ECON 3150, or 4120 or consent of instructor. Changes
    in the quantity of money and alternative government spending, taxation and debt policies, interrelations of fiscal and monetary policies in stabilization
    programs.
    [Professor David Black]
  • ECON 4250/5250 (Labor Economics, 3 cr. hrs.) TR 2:00-3:15 PM. Prerequisites: ECON 1200 or consent of the instructor. Labor force characteristics, wage determination, hours and condition of work, unemployment, labor union structure and growth, collective bargaining and modern labor legislation. [Professor Kristen Keith]
  • ECON 4510/5510 (International Economics I, 3 cr. hrs.) MW 2:00-3:15 PM. Prerequisites: ECON 1150 or 1200. Theory of international trade; commercial policy; cost and benefits, economic integration; trade and economic growth and balance of payments problems. [Professor Gene Chang]
  • ECON 4820/5820 (Econometrics II, 3 cr. hrs.) TR 11:00-12:15 PM.Prerequisite: Econ 4810 or consent of instructor. An introduction to forecasting methods for economic time-series including Bayesian methods. Both theory and application of forecasting models and methods are covered. [Professor Oleg Smirnov]

For the complete list of economics courses please visit the registrar's website: http://www.utoledo.edu/offices/registrar/sch_classes.html

Last Updated: 3/22/15