College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

CPPS Undergraduate Research Opportunities

Department of Pharmacology

Lab Information

Dr. F. Scott Hall
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 282D
E-mail: frank.hall@utoledo.edu
Phone: 419-383-1504 (Office)

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • Behavioral genetics of addiction
    • Neurodevelopmental models of psychiatric disorders
    • Genetic models of psychiatric disorders
    • Epigenetic mechanisms in psychiatric disorders
    • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
    • Dopamine transporter knockout mice
    • The behavioral and neural consequences of social isolation
    • The role of cell adhesion molecules in addiction

Lab Information

Dr. Ming-Cheh Liu
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 294C
E-mail: ming.liu@utoledo.edu
Phone: 419-383-1918 (Office)

The research in our lab is focused on drug-metabolizing enzymes, particularly the Phase II enzymes. We have a long-standing interest on the role of the cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) in the metabolism and disposal of drugs and other xenobiotics. A major area we are particularly interested in is the role of the SULTs in protection against the adverse effects of obstetric/pediatric drugs during feta/neonatal/child development.

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of human and zebrafish drug-sulfating SULTs.
    • Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of human and zebrafish Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes.
    • Investigation of the developmental toxicity of selected obstetric and pediatric drugs during zebrafish development.

Lab Information

Dr. Youssef Sari
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 282G
E-mail:youssef.sari@utoledo.edu
Phone: 419-383-1507 (Office)

Two research projects are ongoing in my Neuroprotection and Drug Abuse Research Lab: The first project is dealing with the investigation of the role of a neurotransmitter system such as glutamate transporter in alcohol-drinking behavior in rat models using behavioral, molecular and pharmacological manipulations. The second project is dealing with the use derived neurotrophic peptides and other neuroprotective compounds in the treatment of Huntington’s disease, using behavioral, molecular and pharmacological techniques.

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • Role of glutamate transporter 1 in alcohol dependence using animal models.
    • Role of neurotrophic peptides and neuroprotective compounds in the treatment of Huntington’s disease.

Lab Information

Dr. Frederick Williams
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 284D
419-383-1991
fwillia2@utnet.utoledo.edu

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

Our main interest is developmental and behavioral toxicology. The laboratory has three main projects that are ongoing where undergraduates could participate. It has been the practice of the laboratory to give undergraduates a project that gives them success and challenges them as well. Some have taken a project from beginning (1) to end (3).

    • Chemical exposure of developing eggs – the main chemicals of interest here are alcohols, heavy metals, Lanthionine ketimine, and some pharmaceuticals/ preservatives.
    • Biochemical and/or immunological testing for oxidative stress and other problems that may impede development.
    • Behavioral characterization of animals that are produced through chemical exposure 

Lab Information

Dr. William Messer
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 274C

Our research is focused on the development of new treatments for neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and drug abuse.  Research includes the synthesis of novel compounds, characterization of pharmacological properties at neurotransmitter receptors and testing in relevant paradigms for activity in the central nervous system.

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • The synthesis of small molecules as M5 muscarinic antagonists for the treatment of drug abuse.
    • Pharmacological characterization of compounds at muscarinic receptor subtypes.

Department of Pharmacy Practice

Pharmaceutical Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR) Laboratory Information

Dr. Sharrel Pinto
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 115C
E-mail:
sharrel.pinto@utoledo.edu
Phone: 419-383-1906 (Office)

PCOR is one of the only known research facilities in the nation that is dedicated to assisting practitioners in developing, implementing, and evaluating Medication Therapy Management programs and services. Research done within this lab is nationally and internationally recognized. The focus of the research conducted within PCOR primarily involves assessing outcomes of patients. Most research projects are conducted in collaboration with various pharmacy sites. Additionally, several projects provide students with an opportunity to shadow or work in a pharmacy when completing their research. This type of research is often referred to as Practice-Based Research and utilizes a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis while providing a great deal of professional fulfillment for students looking to apply their practice and research knowledge.

Research in PCOR is rich and hands-on. Typically, students have longitudinal experiences that provide a well-rounded experience as opposed to a short-segmented one. Students are exposed to a variety of different research skills ranging from data collection and entry to analysis and report writing. Every student is able to present and/or publish work at regional, national or international venues.

Candidates most likely to be considered will be highly motivated, proactive, have good problem solving, critical thinking, and writing skills, should be good at multi-tasking, and should posses the ability to become an independent learner.

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects (not exhaustive)

  • Assessing the impact of MTM programs on patient outcomes
  • Medication Adherence: How can pharmacists and other HC providers make a difference?
  • Studying the impact of the pharmacists within the Patient
  • Centered Medical Home Model
  • Outcomes Research within Health Care

Please e-mail Dr. Pinto with the following information and a current CV.

  • First and Last Name:
  • Enrollment Status: Please state the name of the program in which you are currently enrolled and the year
  • Current GPA
  • A listing of statistics and writing courses you may have taken in high school or college
  • A one-page essay of the area of research that you are interested in and why

Lab Information

Sai HS. Boddu, Ph.D.
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 114
419-383-1959
Email: sboddu@utnet.utoledo.edu 

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

Design and characterization of a microemulsion based drug delivery system for the treatment of posterior segment ocular diseases such as diabetic macular edema.

Spring, Summer or Fall

 

Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry

Research Courses offered by the Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry by arrangement with the instructor:

MBC 4780            Practicum in Medicinal Chemistry
MBC 4900            Honors Seminar
MBC 4910            Problems in Biomedicinal Chemistry (usually taken for independent study or literature study outside of laboratory work)
MBC 4960            Honors Thesis
MBC 4950            Research in Medicinal Chemistry 

For students who intend to pursue the 5 year BSPS/MS in Medicinal Chemistry:

Coordinate your undergraduate research experiences with the intended master’s research to gain efficiency and to increase productivity in MS thesis research. Select a practicum, Honors Seminar/Research and/or Research in Medicinal Chemistry from the professor with whom you propose to write your master’s thesis. This experience will enable you to enter MS program and to get results in MS thesis research faster.

 


Lab Information

Dr. Isaac T. Schiefer
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 284C
Phone: 419-383-1935 (Office)
E-mail: isaac.schiefer@utoledo.edu

The research in our lab is focused on developing new therapies for brain disorders, particularly neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury). We are interested in developing therapies that enhance levels of an important growth factor, known as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).  We carry out a wide-range of preclinical research activities, including: organic synthesis, bioanalytical characterization of in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetics/metabolism (using HPLC and LC-MS), and in vivo behavioral efficacy studies using murine models of cognition deficit.

We are seeking hard working highly motivated students who will go “above and beyond” to advance our research. Most of our projects require a solid foundation (or at least a high degree of interest) in organic medicinal chemistry.

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry- Drug Design and Synthesis: Synthesis, purification, and characterization of novel small molecules. This includes structure activity relationship (SAR) development, hit-to-lead optimization, and improving our synthetic route for scale-up processes.
    • Bioanalytical Chemistry- Examine neuromodulatory activity: Analysis of drug pharmacokinetics via tissue extraction and HPLC-MS/MS analysis. This includes using cell biology techniques to examine levels of certain proteins from brain homogenates.  
    • Chemical Biology- Photoaffinity labeling: Synthesize probe molecules and carry out target identification using modern techniques in chemical biology. Includes a mixture of synthetic chemistry, cell biology, and bioanalytical techniques. This project requires a solid foundation in organic chemistry and an ability to understand concepts across a wide range of biochemical disciplines.

Lab Information

Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich
Main Campus, Wolfe Hall 2219
Phone: 419-530-1940 or -1937
Email:  abryant9@utnet.utoledo.edu

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • The work focuses on the use of synthetic organic chemistry to determine mechanisms relevant to disease etiology. We have a special focus on oxidative damage to nucleic acids and their role in the initiation and propagation of processes related to cancer and other age related disorders. We have developed expertise in the synthesis of modified nucleosides and nucleotides and nucleic acid analysis.
    • Spring, summer and fall

Lab Information

Dr. Paul Erhardt
Main Campus, Wolfe Hall 2206B
419-530-2167

Email: paul.erhardt@utoledo.edu

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • Synthetic medicinal chemistry and cell culture assays of drug candidates, both along the theme of potentially new small molecule chemotherapeutic agents to treat cancer.
    • Spring, summer and fall

Lab Information

Dr. Hermann von Grafenstein
Main Campus, Wolfe Hall 2257A
419-530-1920
Email: hermann.grafenstein@utoledo.edu

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • Solution structure studies of MHC-bound immunogenic peptides that play a role in host defense and autoimmunity. The project involves molecular biology techniques (protein expression in bacteria, reconstitution of peptide-MHC complexes and biochemical purification), analytical techniques (mass-spectrometry, NMR), and computational techniques.
    • Structure-function studies of an anti-inflammatory therapeutic peptide. The project involves molecular biology and biochemical techniques (plasmid construction, expression of a fusion protein and purification) and analytical techniques (mass-spectrometry, NMR, fluorescence anisotropy and others). The project is collaborative with Dr. Abraham Nader and others.
    • Semesters: spring, summer, fall

Lab Information

Dr. Marcia McInerney
Main Campus, BO 2830
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 284A
419-530-1981 (phone)
419-530-7946 (FAX)
email: marcia.mcinerney@utoledo.edu

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

    • Transgenic mice that express the insulin receptor on T cells which allows movement into the pancreas. This project would involve staining tissue sections to show that T cells have entered the pancreas and staining for insulin to show that they are in the islet.
    • Generation of a plasmid for a new transgenic mouse involving molecular biology techniques
    • Work on Type 2 Diabetes examining the inflammation in the adipose tissue. this will require staining of the adipose tissue and multiphoton imaging analysis
    • Literature research on inflammation in adipose tissue to help write the introduction for a paper
    • Spring, summer and fall

Lab Information

Dr. Zahoor Shah
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 294A
419-383-1587
zahoor.shah@utoledo.edu

We study neuroprotective properties of various agents including natural remedies using neuron based ischemic models.

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

Spring, summer and fall


 Lab Information

Dr. James Slama
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 274E
419-383-1925
james.slama@utoledo.edu

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

We use an interdisciplinary approach combining chemical synthesis and biological methods to investigate cellular signaling. We are currently focused on the role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) in cell regulation. We synthesize novel compounds and apply them biologically.

Spring, Summer or Fall


Lab Information

Dr. L.M.V. Tillekeratne
Main Campus, Wolfe Hall 2023
419-530-1983
liyanaaratchige.tillekeratne@utoledo.edu

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

Synthesis of anti-cancer agents based on the natural products epothilone and largazole. Steroselective reactions applied to the synthesis of natural products.

Spring, Summer or Fall


 Lab Information

Dr. Katherine Wall
Health Science Campus, Wolfe Center 294B
419-383-1943
Email: katherine.wall@utoledo.edu

Possible Undergraduate Research Projects

  • Development of carbohydrate based cancer vaccines. Calcium release and signaling in lymphocytes. Research into the mechanism and therapy of autoimmune disease.
  • Prefers students who have already taken a course in immunology.
  • Spring, Summer or Fall
Last Updated: 3/23/15