Army ROTC Rocket Battalion

main menu

/

Contact Us

Main Campus
Health Education Center

Room 2100
419.530.4696/4695

arotc@utoledo.edu

Department overview

Mission
The Rocket Battalion partners with the University to recruit, educate, develop, and inspire ROTC Cadets in order to become future Second Lieutenants who are ready to meet the needs of the United States Army.  The Rocket Battalion also partners with high schools to conduct JROTC in order to develop citizens of character for a lifetime, showcasing the U.S. Army in a positive light.

Department Summary:
The Department of Military Science and Leadership is home to the UT Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Rocket Battalion. Dr. Phillip C. Nash, then President of the University, made a formal application to the War Department for an Infantry ROTC unit in January 1947 and the ROTC was established on May 28, 1947. Over 2,000 lieutenants have been commissioned through the program since 1947.

Faculty by the Numbers:
8 (four active duty, three government service, and one UT). The 8 faculty members have a combined 200 years of service to our nation and almost half possess a Masters degree. Faculty members are nominated for their positions in the ROTC by the Army and assignments are from two to four years.

Cadets by the Numbers:
The UToledo Army ROTC is comprised of student cadets from all fields of study from across all campuses. Currently, 90 undergraduate; 35% STEM, 30% are female, 25% are minority; the average cadet maintains a 3.0 GPA and is enrolled in 17 credit hours per semester. The average Cadet enters their freshman year with a 3.8 high school GPA, 26 ACT, and is a two-sport athlete. Cadets who return for their sophomore year graduate at a rate of 96%.

Commanders Endstate:
The Rocket Battalion is an aggressive, disciplined, physically and mentally hardened organization that is run by the Cadet Chain of Command. The Rocket Battalion graduates and commissions quality officers for service to our nation. The battalion is seen as a positive influence on both on- and off-campus as the face of the U.S. Army.

Service/Career: Many of the Commissioned Lieutenants become career Army. Others choose to serve their eight years (in active duty, National Guard or Army Reserve) and then go on to the careers for which they trained while earning their degree. These careers span all disciplines—engineering, nursing, and law enforcement for example.

History:
Several years prior to 1947, civic groups in Toledo encouraged the university administration to consider the establishment of an Army ROTC unit at The University of Toledo. World War II interrupted these plans, but on 29 January 1947, Dr. Philip C. Nash, then President of the university, made a formal application to the War Department for an Infantry ROTC unit.

In response to this application and following an inspection of the university’s facilities, the ROTC unit was established on 28 May 1947. An Engineer unit was established 1 April 1951. In September 1951, the ROTC department at The University of Toledo was selected as one of the units to enact the general Military Science curriculum.

Initially, the Corps of Cadets consisted of 110 students, 40 of whom were veterans of World War II. From this group came many of the policies concerning the ROTC department on this campus, including such matters as academic credit for pursuit of Military Science courses.

The Army ROTC Battalion at The University of Toledo is a group of outstanding men and women committed to excellence. Over 2000 lieutenants have been commissioned through the program since 1947.

leadership training

Any enrolled college student can participate in the first two years of Army ROTC leadership courses without committing to join the Army. This is a unique opportunity to learn valuable skills and explore the program before deciding if this is a career path for you.

  • MSL 1010 - Introduction to the Army (3 Credit Hours)
    Introduces the Army and the Profession of Arms. Students will examine the Army Profession and what it means to be a professional in the U.S. Army. The overall focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of the Army Leadership Requirements Model while gaining a big picture understanding of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Cadets also learn how resiliency and fitness supports their development as an Army leader. Leadership lab required.
  • MSL1020 - Foundations of Agile and Adaptive Leadership (3 Credit Hours)
    Introduces the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, time management, goal setting, and communication. Cadets learn the basics of the communications process and the importance for leader’s to develop the essential skills to effectively communicate in the Army. Cadets will begin learning the basics of squad level tactics that will be reinforced during a weekly lab.
  • MSL2010 - Leadership and Decision Making (3 Credit Hours)
    This course adds depth to the understanding of the Adaptability Army Learning Area. The outcomes are demonstrated through Critical and Creative Thinking and the ability to apply Troop Leading Procedures (TLP) to apply Innovative Solutions to Problems. The Army Profession is also stressed through leadership forums and a leadership self-assessment. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during weekly lab.
  • MSL2020 - Army Doctrine and Team Development (3 Credit Hours)
    Focuses on Army doctrine and team development. The course begins the journey to understand and demonstrate competencies as they relate to Army doctrine. Army Values, Teamwork, and Warrior Ethos and their relationship to the Law of Land Warfare and philosophy of military service are also stressed. The ability to lead and follow is also covered through Team Building exercises at squad level. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during a weekly lab.

Advanced Courses

As juniors and seniors you will learn advanced military tactics and gain experience in team organization, planning, and decision making.

  • MSL 3010 - Training Management and the Warfighting Functions (3 Credit Hours)
    Focuses on training management and the warfighting functions. It is an academically challenging course were you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Training Management and how the Army operates through the Warfighting functions. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, preparing, and executing training for a squad conducting small unit tactics. Includes a lab per week using peer facilitation.

  • MSL 3020 - Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations (3 Credit Hours)
    Focuses on applied leadership in small unit operations. It is an academically challenging course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of direct level leadership and small unit tactics at the platoon level. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a platoon in the execution of a mission. Includes a weekly lab using peer facilitation.
  • MSL 3850 – Advance Camp (3 Credit Hours)
    This is a defining Leader Development experience driven by mission type orders for cadets who have made the commitment to serve as officers in the U.S. Army after graduation. The challenging conditions force Cadets to think critically and lead under a stressful operational environment representative of what platoon leaders of 2025 will encounter. This course only occurs in the summer and is a commissioning requirement. Prerequisite: Permission of department.
  • MSL 4010 - The Army Officer (3 Credit Hours)
    Focuses on development of the Army Officer. It is an academically challenging course were you will develop knowledge, skills, and abilities to plan, resource, and assess training at the small unit level. You will also learn about Army programs that support counseling subordinates and evaluating performance, values and ethics, career planning, and legal responsibilities. At the conclusion of this course, you will be familiar with how to plan, prepare, execute, and continuously assess the conduct of training at the company or field grade officer level. Includes a lab per week.
  • MSL 4020 - Company Grade Leadership (3 Credit Hours)
    An academically challenging course were you will develop knowledge, skills, and abilities required of junior officers pertaining to the Army in Unified Land Operations and Company Grade Officer roles and responsibilities. Successful completion of this course will assist in preparing you for your BOLC B course and is a mandatory requirement for commissioning. Includes a lab per week.
  • MSL 4800 - US Military History (3 Credit Hours)
    This course provides you with a historical perspective to decisions made by American military leaders. In this course, you will cover major military engagements from the colonial period through the current operating environment. 
  • MSL 4990 - Independent Studies in US Military History (3 Credit Hours)
    During this course students will examine the origin and development of the profession of arms as it applies to U.S. Army officers. Using ROTC Blackboard students will conduct battle animations and read course materials to gain a base of knowledge of U.S. Military History from the Colonial Period to Operation Iraqi Freedom, and its leaders and how it is continuously evolving to meet the needs of current political situations.

Leadership Lab

All Cadets participate in weekly Leadership Lab as part of their 3 credit hour class. Leadership Lab provides the opportunity for “hands-on” training and skill development. All leadership labs are led by upper-class Cadets as part of their leadership development experience. Leadership labs are usually held on Thursday between 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

  • Physical Fitness Training MSL 1030, MSL 1040, MSL 2030, MSL 2040, MSL 3030, MSL 3040, MSL 4030, MSL 4040 (1 Credit Hour)
    Physical fitness training sessions are conducted from 6:15 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. Physical training is conducted in small groups under the supervision of a group leader and are mandatory three times per week for contracted Cadets.

At the conclusion of the Military Science and Leadership Program you will be prepared to commission as an Army Officer with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to plan, resource, and assess training at the small unit level. You will also learn about Army programs that support counseling subordinates and evaluating performance, values and ethics, career planning, and legal responsibilities. You will be familiar with how to plan, prepare, execute, and continuously assess missions and the conduct of training at the company or field grade officer level.

army rotc special training

Learn more about the Army ROTC special training, which includes Airborne school, Air Assault school, and Northern Warfare school.

minor in military science and leadership

Cadets who complete 27 credit hours of core military science and leadership requirements may apply for the minor.

 

 

Last Updated: 5/10/19