Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Religious Days Calendar

Religious Days Calendar

Our students and employees have many faith traditions. To promote greater understanding of those traditions, we have collaborated with campus  to create a collection of many of the religious holidays.

This is a living document. Expect descriptions and dates to change. If you have suggestions for changes or additions, contact the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion via email:
diversity@utoledo.edu.

Upcoming Religious Days

 Spring 2022 Summer 2022

SPRING 2022

January 1: Oshogatsu (Shinto)
Celebration of New Year, commemorated by going to a shrine, thanking the kami (spirits), asking for good fortune and letting resolutions be known in presence of kami. It is the most important holiday in Japan and most businesses are closed from January 1st to the 3rd. Years are traditionally viewed as completely separate, with each new year providing a fresh start. Consequently, all duties are supposed to be completed by the end of the year, while bonenkai parties ("year forgetting parties") are held with the purpose of leaving the old year's worries and troubles behind.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

January 6: Epiphany (Christian) or Three Kings Day for Catholics
Feast day that celebrates the revelation of God the Son as a human being in Jesus Christ. Most Christians mark the day on the Sunday closest to Jan. 6 and it is usually limited to that day's church service and sermon. But it opens the church's "season of Epiphany," a time when sermons and lessons focus on the miracles of Jesus; the season ends on the Sunday before Ash Wednesday, the start of the Lenten season.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Cru, Catholic Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

January 7: Christmas (Orthodox Christian)
Celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ in Orthodox Churches. Orthodox Christmas is widely celebrated in Eastern European countries such as Russia, Ukraine, and Serbia. Orthodox Christmas focuses on religious rituals and traditions, it is a time to find peace and unity and heal the soul. As such, they do not observe commercialized traditions such as the exchange of presents or decorating the tree. Many people observe a fast before Orthodox Christmas day and give up things such as meat and dairy.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

January 9: Birth of Guru Gobind Singh (Sikh)
Birthday of tenth and last Guru. Guru Gobind Singh Ji's teaching and warrior spirit holds great importance to Sikhs. On this day, Sikhs around the world go to Gurudwaras where prayer meetings are organized in honor of Guru Gobind Singh Ji. Many families participate in processions organized by the Gurudwaras, hold kirtans and do seva, which is a significant part of the Sikh religion. Food is also distributed among the needy and poor on this day.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

January 14: Makara Sankranthi (Hindu)
Celebration of the Sun god. In Maharashtra, there is a custom of exchanging sweets made of jaggery, as the first sugarcane crop for the year is harvested during the period. Flying kites is one of the popular Makar Sankranti traditions of Maharashtra. Colorful kites, made of different shapes and sizes, are also flown in Gujarat, as a part of the celebrations of Makar Sankranti. Charity forms a significant part of the traditions of Makar Sankranti. In the state of Uttar Pradesh, one can witness people donating Khichdi (rice cooked with lentils) to the poor and needy. People in Andhra Pradesh also indulge themselves in charity of clothes.

Student insight and recommendation: This is very widely celebrated by our students on UToledo's campus.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Indian Student Cultural Organization, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

January 17*: Tu B'shevat (Jewish)
New Year of the Trees. Fruit trees were awarded special status in the Torah because of their importance in sustaining life and as a symbol of God's divine favor. In modern times, Tu Bishvat has become a symbol of both Zionist attachment to the land of Israel as well as an example of Jewish sensitivity to the environment. Early Zionist settlers to Israel began planting new trees not only to restore the ecology of ancient Israel, but as a symbol of renewed growth of the Jewish people returning to their ancestral homeland.

Student insight and recommendation: If professors want to show support they can bring a plant to their classroom, or maybe eat an apple in class!

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Jewish Federation, Hillel, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

February 2: Springtide (Pagan)
Also called Imbolc, Imbolg, Oimelc, Disablot, Saint Brigid's Day, Candlemas. Marks the beginning of Spring. A midpoint holiday as it is about halfway between winter solstice and spring equinox that is typically celebrated around the 1st of February. It marks the beginning of spring. It is a cycle of renewal and creativity. Some see this as a new cycle, a time of purification, and celebrate with spring cleaning in anticipation for the year's new life. Some use this celebration for initiations, re-dedications, and naming ceremonies.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, A Circle Of Pagans, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

February 5: Vasant Panchami (Hindu)
Holy day dedicated to Goddess Saraswati, patron Goddess of knowledge, music, arts, science and technology. People dress in yellow and they offer yellow flowers to others and to the gods and goddesses. The color yellow holds a special meaning for this celebration as it signifies the brilliance of nature and the vibrancy of life. India's crop fields are filled with the color yellow, as the yellow mustard flowers bloom at this time of the year. Pens, notebooks, and pencils are placed near the goddess Devi's feet to be blessed before they are used by students.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Indian Student Cultural Organization, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

February 15: Buddha's Passing/Nehan (Buddhist)
Mahayana festival commemorating the death of the Buddha at the age of 80 and his attainment of parinirvana. In the Buddhist Temple of Toledo community, they mark the occasion with a formal liturgy and a special talk. A banner depicting the Buddha's passing is displayed at the altar and cookies are prepared as an offering that can be shared by community after service.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Buddhist Temple of Toledo, Zen Buddhist Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

February 16: Sangha Day (Buddhist)
Celebration in honor of the Buddhist community, especially regarding monastics.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Buddhist Temple of Toledo, Zen Buddhist Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

February 25-28*: Ayyám-i-Há (Bahá'í)
Days of preparation for the Fast, marked by hospitality and charity to the poor and sick. Like Muslims during Ramadan, Baha'is refrain from food and drink from sunrise to sunset, obligatory for all who are healthy and not traveling, with exemptions for pregnant and nursing mothers and those who are over 70. Fasting is a form of self-discipline and the fast is a time of prayer and meditation, during which Baha'is detach themselves from the things of this world and draw closer to God. Fasting reminds Baha'is of those who are poor and lack food, in order to be more compassionate and encourage charity.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

February 28: Maha Shivaratri (Hindu)
Celebration of the wedding night of Lord Shiva and his Consort Goddess Parvati. Unlike a lot of Hindu festivals, Maha Shivratri is not an overtly joyous festival. This is a night reserved for self-reflection and introspection for the purpose of growing and leaving behind all things that hinder our success. People all over the country celebrate Maha Shivratri according to the customs dictated in the region. Some celebrate in the morning, while others organize pujas and jagrans at night. Some devotees also observe a full day fast on Maha Shivratri, eating only on the next day after bathing. The fast is observed not only to attain Lord Shiva's blessings but also as a test of one's own determination.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Indian Student Cultural Organization, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

March 1*: Lailat al Miraj (Islam)
Commemorates Prophet Muhammad's nighttime journey from Mecca to Jerusalem where he ascended to heaven, was purified, and given the instruction for Muslims to pray 5 times daily. The story of Muhammad's nighttime journey is often read at mosques or at home to celebrate this day.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Muslim Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

March 1-19*: Nineteen Day Fast (Bahá'í)
Sunrise to sunset fast also marked with prayer to reinvigorate soul and bring closer to God (fasting). Shoghi Effendi, the Guardian of the Bahá'í faith, explains that "It is essentially a period of meditation and prayer, of spiritual recuperation, during which the believer must strive to make the necessary readjustments in his inner life, and to refresh and reinvigorate the spiritual forces latent in his soul. Its significance and purpose are, therefore, fundamentally spiritual in character. Fasting is symbolic, and a reminder of abstinence from selfish and carnal desires.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

March 2: Ash Wednesday (Christian)
Day of fasting that commemorates first day of Lent. During Mass (for Catholics) or worship service (for Protestants), the priest or pastor will usually share a sermon that is repentant and reflective in nature. The mood is solemn - many services will have long periods of silence and worshipers will often leave the service in silence. Usually, there is a responsive passage of Scripture, usually centered around confession, read aloud about the leader and congregation. Attendees will experience communal confession, as well as moments where they are prompted to silently confess sins and pray. The ashes of this holiday symbolize two main things: death and repentance.

Student insight and recommendation: some students might be fasting for Lent.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Cru, Catholic Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

March 17*: Purim (Jewish)
Commemorates the story of Esther. Purim is the quintessential community holiday. Nonetheless, there are a number of activities that are centered in the home. One of the favorite activities in preparation for the holiday is the baking of hamantaschen, the triangular filled pastries that are the traditional food at Purim time. In addition, following the commandment to give gifts to friends and the poor, the preparation of so-called mishloah manot baskets is a fun activity to engage in, as is their distribution on the holiday. The centerpiece of Purim's home celebration is the seudah, a festive meal accompanied by alcoholic beverages.

Student Insight and recommendation: This is kind of like Halloween! Get to dress up in costumes and share stories. There can be Purim carnivals depending on the area you live in and it is a joyous time.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Jewish Federation, Hillel, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

March 17-18: Holi (Hindu)
Holiday associated with exuberant flinging of colored powders, celebrates the advent of spring and the enduring message that good will always be victorious over evil; light will always overcome darkness. The University of Toledo's Indian Student Cultural Organization, the International Students Association, and the UToledo Multifaith Council collaborate every year to put on Holi Toledo. This event is to celebrate Holi and all religious diversity on campus. Everyone is welcome to participate!

Student insight and recommendation: Some people will have great bonfires prior to throwing colorful powder to celebrate. Sweets are exchanged after, called Mithai.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Indian Student Cultural Organization, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

March 20*: Nowruz (Bahá'í, Zoroastrian)
Marks the first day of spring. Celebrating Nowruz means the affirmation of life in harmony with nature, awareness of the inseparable link between constructive labor and natural cycles of renewal and a solicitous and respectful attitude towards natural sources of life. Nowruz plays a significant role in strengthening the ties among peoples based on mutual respect and the ideals of peace and good neighborliness. Its traditions and rituals reflect the cultural and ancient customs of the civilizations of the East and West, which influenced those civilizations through the interchange of human values.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

March 21*: Midspring- Spring Equinox (Pagan)
Also called Ostara, Vernal Equinox, Alban Eilir, Liberalia, Hilaria. A solar holiday that typically occurs between the 20th and 23rd of March. It is a time when the day and night are equal. It marks the balance of the light and dark (shadow) sides of the year. It is a cycle of planting and birth. Some celebrate by planting seeds, both physically and spiritually (planting the seeds of intention for what you want to grow throughout the year). It is a time of fertility and new growth.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, A Circle of Pagans, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 3-May 2*: Ramadan (Islam)
Month of fasting to commemorate first revelation of the Qur'an to Muhammad. During Ramadan, Muslims fast from dawn to dusk each day. They are supposed to avoid eating, drinking, smoking and sexual activity, as well as unkind or impure thoughts and words and immoral behavior. Ramadan is a time to practice self-restraint and self-reflection. All Muslims who have reached puberty and are in good health are required to fast. The sick and elderly, along with travelers, pregnant women and those who are nursing are exempt.

Student insight and recommendation: To accommodate fasting some student's sleep schedules may be off (getting up early to eat, staying up late to eat). Students will overall be trying to preserve their energy throughout the day and ask for patience and communication from faculty.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Muslim Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 10: Palm Sunday (Christian)
Feast commemorates Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Palm Sunday, or Passion Sunday as it is referred to in some Christian churches, is the sixth Sunday of Lent and the final Sunday before Easter. On this day, Christians also remember Christ's sacrificial death on the cross, praise God for the gift of salvation, and look expectantly to the Lord's second coming.

Student insight and recommendation: a scripture to check out is Mark 11:8-9. Some students from Palm Sunday to Easter will be going to church every night. To show support, faculty can bring a palm leaf into the classroom the Friday before Palm Sunday.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Cru, Catholic Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 10: Rama Navami (Hindu)
Celebration of birth of Prince Rama, avatar of the Hindu God Vishnu, to King Dasharatha and Queen Kausalya in Ayodhya. Hindus across the country and in different parts of the world chant stories about Shri Ram. Many recite and sing folklores to celebrate the festival. Worshippers also wash Lord Ram's idols and decorate them with dresses and make the statue sit in a miniature cradle. Other devotees even organize community meals for the neighborhood, especially to be distributed among the poor. Other people also observe a vrat (fast) at this festival. People offer sweets to one another to mark this special occasion.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Indian Cultural Student Organization, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 14: Holy Thursday (Christian)
Commemorates the Maundy (washing the feet of the poor) and Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the Apostles. Washing of feet is a traditional component. Many things happened on this holy day including the first communion, announcement that Judas would betray Jesus, announced that Peter would deny him, and many more.

Student insight and recommendation: Check out Matthew 26:26-29.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Cru, Catholic Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 14: Vaisakhi (Sikh)
Marks the establishment of the Khalsa (religious community of Sikhs) by Guru Gobind Singh. To celebrate Vaisakhi, Sikhs will visit places of worship called Gurdwaras. These will also be especially decorated for the occasion. Many people enjoy parades and special processions through the streets called nagar kirtans. Celebrations traditionally include singing and music, as well as reading scriptures out loud and chanting hymns.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 14: Mahavir Jayanthi (Jain)
Celebrates birth of Mahavira, the founder of Jainism. It is the most auspicious day for Jains. The day is celebrated across the world by the Jain community in memory of the last spiritual teacher of Jainism. Mahavira's teachings are the main pillars for Jainism and are also known as "Jain Agamas".

  • Nonviolence (Ahimsa) causing no harm to the living beings
  • Truthfulness (Satya) to speak the truth
  • Non-stealing (Asteya) not to possess things that do not belong to you
  • Chastity (Bramacharya) not to indulge in sensual pleasures
  • Non-attachment (Aparigraha) not to get attached to material things.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 15: Good Friday (Christian)
Commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death at Calvary. For Christians, Good Friday is a crucial day of the year because it celebrates what Christians believe to be the most momentous weekend in the history of the world. It is a time of sorrow for the crucifixion of Jesus.

Student insight and recommendation: Check out Mark 15:33-39. Some students might be attending church services on this day.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Cru, Catholic Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 16: Holy Saturday (Catholic)
Also called Easter Vigil. This observance ends the Lenten season falling one day before Easter Sunday.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Catholic Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 16-23*: Passover (Jewish)
Commemorates liberation of Israelites by God from slavery in Egypt and their freedom as a nation under leadership of Moses (work is prohibited on first and last two days_. The central ritual of Passover is the seder, a carefully choreographed ritual meal that typically takes place in the home. A number of symbolic foods are laid out on the table, of which the most important is the matzah, the unleavened "bread of affliction." The seder follows a script laid out in the Haggadah, a book that tells the story of the redemption from Egypt.

Student insight and recommendation: During the entire 7 days Jewish people are prohibited from using anything that rises such as bread and yeast.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Jewish Federation, Hillel, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 16: Hanuman Jayantï (Hindu)
Celebration of birthday of Hanuman, foremost devotee of Sri Rama and Sita. Lord Hanuman is worshipped as a deity with the ability to attain victory against evil and provide protection. On this auspicious day, devotees of Lord Hanuman celebrate him and seek his protection and blessings. They travel to temples to worship him and present religious offerings.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Indian Student Cultural Organization, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 17: Easter (Christian)
Celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. In the New Testament of the Bible, the event is said to have occurred three days after Jesus was crucified by the Romans and died in roughly 30 A.D. The holiday concludes the "Passion of Christ," a series of events and holidays that begins with Lent—a 40-day period of fasting, prayer and sacrifice—and ends with Holy Week.

Student insight and recommendation: Check out Matthew 28:5-7. This is a joyous time of celebration and gratitude to be shared with family. Please give students ample notice of assignments or exams due on this day.

April 20-May 1*: Ridván (Bahá'í)
Twelve-day festival when founder Bahá'u'lláh declared his mission. The festival of Ridvan is the most joyous of Baha'i holy days. In villages, towns, and cities around the world, Baha'i communities celebrate these special days with gatherings open to all. In thousands of localities around the globe on the first day of Ridvan, Baha'is also vote for their local governing councils. And throughout the 12-day festival of Ridvan, national conventions are held in some 180 countries and territories, during which delegates gather to vote for their National Spiritual Assembly, a nine-member council responsible for guiding, coordinating, and stimulating the activities of the Baha'is in its jurisdiction. Baha'i elections are distinct for their lack of nomination and campaigning.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 24: Pascha (Orthodox Christianity)
Celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. People confess, "It is the Day of Resurrection, let us be glorious, let us embrace one another and speak to those that hate us; let us forgive all things and so let us cry, Christ has arisen from the dead". By this hymn they admit that love of one's fellowman is the solid foundation of the faith in the Resurrection of Christ. It is a joyous celebration and a time of peace.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

April 27: Yom Ha'shoah (Jewish)
Holocaust Memorial Day. The full name of the day commemorating the victims of the Holocaust is "Yom Hashoah Ve-Hagevurah"– literally the "Day of (Remembrance of) the Holocaust and the Heroism." It is marked on the 27th day in the month of Nisan — a week after the seventh day of Passover. Since the early 1960s, the sound of a siren on Yom Hashoah stops traffic and pedestrians throughout the State of Israel for two minutes of silent devotion. The siren blows at sundown as the holiday begins and once again at 11 a.m. the following morning. All radio and television programs during this day are connected in one way or another with the Jewish destiny in World War II, including personal interviews with survivors.

Student insight and recommendation: Some students at 11am might want to take a moment of silence. This is a very sad day and students might be somewhat "out of it", please be patient and respectful.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Jewish Federation, Hillel, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

May 1: Summertide (Pagan)
Also called Bealtaine, Beltane, May Day, May Eve, Walpurgis Night, Floralia. A midpoint holiday as it is about halfway between spring equinox and summer solstice that is typically celebrated around the 1st of May. It marks the beginning of summer. It is a cycle of creation and life. It is considered by some to be one of the fire festivals and is one in which there were purification rites and blessings of fertility. Some use this celebration for unions/handfastings or renewing intentions to one another.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, A Circle of Pagans, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

May 3*: Eid al-Fitr (Islam)
Marks the end of Ramadan, holy month of fasting. During Eid al-Fitr, Muslims take part in special morning prayers, greet each other with formal embraces and offer each other greetings of "Eid Mubarak," or "Have a blessed Eid." They gather with family and friends, give games and gifts to children and prepare and eat special meals, including sweet dishes like baklava or Turkish delight in Turkey, date-filled pastries and cookies in Saudi Arabia and Iraq and bint al sahn (honey cake) in Yemen.

Student insight and recommendation: This is one of the most important holidays for Muslims and asks faculty to give students ample notice of assignments/exams scheduled for this day.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Muslim Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

May 8: Buddha's Birthday (Buddhist)
Holiday that commemorates the birth of the Buddha To celebrate this event there is a special service which includes a ceremony in which several Buddha images are placed in small wash tubs. The Sangha is invited to pour water over the Buddha, marking the birth of he who would come to awakening and teach others how to do the same.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Buddhist Temple of Toledo, Zen Buddhist Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.


SUMMER 2022

May 19*: Lag B'Omer (Jewish)
Celebrates anniversary of the passing of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, author of the Zohar (text of Jewish mysticism). Lag Ba'omer is a minor holiday that occurs on the 33rd day of the Omer, the 49-day period between Passover and Shavuot. A break from the semi-mourning of the Omer, key aspects of Lag Ba'omer include holding Jewish weddings (it's the one day during the Omer when Jewish law permits them), lighting bonfires and getting haircuts.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Jewish Federation, Hillel, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

May 24: Declaration of the Báb (Bahá'í)
Commemorates declaration of the Báb, the forerunner of Bahá'u'lláh the founder of the Bahá'í Faith. Baha'is view the Bab as a Messenger of God, who had a role that can be likened to John the Baptist (who told of the coming of Christ) in heralding the coming of the latest Manifestation of God: Baha'u'llah. The events surrounding the Declaration of the Bab have been told in many ways, but perhaps the most widely read is the account in The Dawn-Breakers: Nabil's Narrative of the Early Days of the Baha'i Revelation. This book was written by Nabil and chronicles the early days of the Revelations of the Bab and Baha'u'llah.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

May 26: Ascension Day (Christianity)
Feast of Ascension Day for Catholics – Celebrates the departure of Christ from Earth into the presence of God. It always falls on the fortieth day from Easter and, since Easter always falls on a Sunday, Ascension Day always falls on a Thursday; it is frequently called "Holy Thursday." Having accomplished redemption through his suffering on the cross, the risen and exalted Christ now applies the salvation he has won, by granting the gifts of repentance and forgiveness of sins.

Student insight and recommendation: Check out Luke 24:50-53.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Cru, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

May 29: Ascension of Bahá'u'lláh (Bahá'í)
Anniversary of death of founder. This important holy day is celebrated on the 29th May, at 3am. This solemn anniversary is a day of rest, and is often observed by reading or chanting from the scriptures.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

June 5-6*: Shavuot (Jewish)
Festival commemorating giving of the Torah at Mt. Sinai (work restrictions). Much of the observance of the holiday centers on the synagogue and its rituals. The special readings for the holiday include medieval poems (piyyutim) and the Book of Ruth. Another tradition is to participate in a Tikkun Leil Shavuot, an all-night study session marking the holiday.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Jewish Federation, Hillel, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

June 5: Pentecost (Christian)
Celebrates the descent of the Holy Spirit on the disciples of Jesus after his Ascension. Pentecost isn't associated with feasts or elaborate traditions. Generally, it is a holiday marked in liturgical churches. Because the holiday's liturgical color is red, to symbolize the apostles ''tongues of fire" and also the blood of martyrs, sometimes Christians will dress in red or decorate churches with red.

Student insight and recommendation: Check out Acts 2:1-4

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Cru, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

July 7*: Tisha B'Av (Jewish)
Day of mourning to commemorate many tragedies that have befallen Jewish people, many occurring on the ninth of Av (fasting and work restrictions). In addition to not eating or drinking, we are not allowed to wash, anoint oneself or wear leather shoes. In a prohibition more stringent than on Yom Kippur, Jews are only allowed to study certain portions of the Torah and Talmud on Tisha B'Av. The observance of Tisha B'Av begins with the Seudah HaMafseket, the last meal before the fast commences.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, the Jewish Federation, Hillel, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

July 10*: Eid al-Adha (Islam)
Commemorates Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice of his son to God. There are two key Eid's (Celebration Festivals) in Islam: Eid-ul-Fitr, which signifies the completion of the Holy Month of Ramadan; and Eid-ul-Adha, the greater Eid, which follows the completion of the annual Hajj pilgrimage, at the time of Qurbani (sacrifice). Depending on the country, the celebrations of Eid-ul-Adha can last anywhere between two and four days. The act of Qurbani (sacrifice) is carried out following the Eid Salaah (Eid Prayers), which are performed in congregation at the nearest Mosque on the morning of Eid.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council, Yale's Chaplain's Office, Muslim Student Association, and UToledo Multifaith Council.

July 10: Martyrdom of the Báb (Bahá'í)
Date the Báb was executed. This holiday commemorates the 1850 execution of the co-founder of the Baha'i faith, the Báb, in Persia. It is one of nine holy days during which work and school is suspended.

From the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion student intern Isabella Weik in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Multifaith Council.

Last Updated: 2/23/22